Washington

Democratic Lawmakers Feel Boost from Women’s March
Minority party hopes movement will help Congress rein in Trump

Protesters march down Independence Avenue in Washington, holding signs during the women’s march on Saturday, the day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Capitol Dome was more than just a symbolic backdrop for Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington. It was the intended target of hundreds of thousands of voices of frustration with President Donald Trump. 

For all of the anti-Trump placards — both crude and shrewd — many marchers descended on the nation’s capital to send a message to the branch of government that, they hope, will be a check on the new president.

Message from Charlotte: Revolution Starts at Home
Local women’s march a reminder of how past divisions were resolved in ways no one could have imagined

Left to right: Tommy and Debbie George marched at the Women’s March in Charlotte, N.C., with their friend Mary Lou Buck. (Mary C. Curtis/CQ Roll Call)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — In this very blue city, in a state that went red for Donald Trump while sending a Democratic governor to the statehouse, a crowd estimated at more than 10,000 filled the streets at Saturday’s Women’s March. It was one of many across the country, sending a message that the story of Election 2016, far from being over, is just beginning.

The winding route took marchers — more than double in number than expected — past signposts of a region that has seen its share of divisions, but has made steady if shaky progress.

Hundreds of Thousands of Marchers Flood the National Mall
Women’s March participants in Washington, D.C. exceed predictions

Protesters march up 14th Street past the Washington Monument holding signs during the Women's March on Washington on Saturday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A District of Columbia official estimated a crowd size of more than half a million people for the Women's March on Washington on Saturday, according to the Associated Press. The march, organized to protest the inauguration of President Donald Trump that took place Friday at the Capitol, was originally expected to garner a crowd of 100,000 to 200,000, according to media reports.

Images of long lines at Metro stations filled social media for several hours leading up to the original 1 p.m. ET march start time (though formal speakers and events began at 10 a.m.).

Numerous Inauguration Protests: From Nonviolent Chants to Bricks-in-Windows
Inauguration Day protests throughout D.C. take different tones

A shattered window of a Starbucks shop in downtown D.C. on Friday. (Matt Rhodes for CQ Roll Call)

On Inaugural Day in Washington, some twenty-something, left-leaning protesters dressed in black threw bricks into the windows of local storefronts. Elsewhere, sixty-something antiwar activists held up colorful signs and coordinated peaceful chants.

And while police used pepper-spray to break up some demonstrators in downtown D.C., on another street a man wearing a cherry-red Make America Great Again baseball cap calmly chatted in the middle of 7th Street NW with a young man wearing a dark hood that enveloped his face.

Trump’s Inaugural Speech: Pitchfork Populism
But will he ‘preserve, protect and defend?’

President Donald J. Trump hugs his family after being sworn in as the 45th President of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts on the West Front of the Capitol, January 20, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The flamethrower has been passed to a new generation, an older generation, bristling with resentments yet faithful to themes of the 2016 campaign.

Donald J. Trump’s inaugural address was one for the ages. For decades to come — no matter how his presidency is remembered — the bluntness of his words on a grey and rainy Friday afternoon will be recalled as a turning point, a fork in the winding road of American democracy.

Inauguration Day in Photos: Trump Supporters Take to Mall, Protesters Light Up Streets
Jan. 20, 2017 as seen by Roll Call's photographers

People gather on the National Mall on Friday morning. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As thousands gathered on the West Front of the Capitol to witness the swearing-in of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States, protesters attempted to block entrances to the mall and parade route and some caused damage to property in downtown D.C.

President Trump: ‘From This Day Forward ... Only America First’
45th president signals major policy shifts in inaugural address

Donald Trump greets President Barack Obama moments before Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States, on the West Front of the Capitol. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump, very much still in campaign mode, vowed in his inaugural address to use his new powers to turn the country inward and “rebuild” America, telling his countrymen and the world he will govern with a simple principle: “It’s going to be only America first.” 

In a striking scene, the bombastic businessman and former reality television star, spoke from the very spot where American political giants like Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama delivered their first remarks as commander in chief.

Trump Sworn In as 45th President
Chief Justice John Roberts administered the oath of office under gray skies

President-elect Donald Trump arrives on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on January 20, 2017 in Washington, D.C. In today’s inauguration ceremony Trump becomes the 45th president of the United States. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Donald Trump is the 45th president of the United States.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. administered the oath of office under gray skies on the West Front of the Capitol.

Protesters Greet Inauguration Guests, Clash With Police in Streets
People swarm Metro stations, event entrances and damage property in protest against Trump

Firefighters quickly extinguished a fire near 13th and Massachusetts Ave. Friday morning before Donald Trump was sworn in. (Matt Rhodes for CQ Roll Call)

Pockets of protests erupted throughout Washington, DC, Friday, at times threatening to overshadow the pomp of Donald Trump's inauguration and presenting a reminder of the stark divisions facing the 45th president.

Demonstrators arrived early, touting concern for issues including immigration, border control, labor and racism. Some attempted -- unsuccessfully -- to block the crowds that filed into the Capitol grounds before Trump was sworn in. In what appeared to be isolated outbursts of violence, other groups set small fires throughout the city, broke windows and clashed with police in the Franklin Square area.

Highlights of Donald Trump’s Inauguration
Bushes arrive for 45th president’s swearing in

President Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts on the West Front of the Capitol on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The inauguration of President Donald Trump was full of both Trump bombast and the ceremonial pomp and circumstance that comes with the swearing in of a new commander in chief.

On one end, many worked to uphold the democratic traditions while Trump sought to drive home the points of his inauguration.