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Rep. Meng: Amend Constitution to Lower Voting Age to 16
The last constitutional amendment was passed in 1992

Rep. Grace Meng, D-N.Y., announced Wednesday that she’s interested in lowering the voting age to 16. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York Democratic Rep. Grace Meng introduced an amendment to the Constitution to lower the nationwide voting age to 16 years old.

The 26th Amendment — passed in 1971 — guarantees the right to vote to eligible citizens who are 18 years old or older, which shifted the voting age down from 21. Meng’s legislation would rewrite the amendment to include 16- and 17-year-olds in federal, state and local elections.

Fame and Campaign Fortune Haven’t Saved ‘Iron Stache’ From a Heated Primary
Randy Bryce faces fellow Democrat Cathy Myers in Wisconsin’s 1st District on Tuesday

Democrat Randy Bryce faces Cathy Myers in Tuesday’s primary in Wisconsin’s 1st District. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Randy Bryce came on to the political scene, he became a Democratic fundraising juggernaut. But the Wisconsin Democrat, who is known by his Twitter moniker “Iron Stache,” hasn’t locked down his primary race in the 1st District, despite a national profile and buckets of money being poured into his campaign.

Bryce faces a potentially competitive contest against Janesville school board member Cathy Myers in Tuesday’s primary. 

The Fight for the Democratic Party Heads to Missouri’s 1st District
Rep. William Lacy Clay is facing a spirited primary challenge from Cori Bush

Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-Mo., here at a news conference last year with fellow members of the Congressional Black Caucus, has fended off primary challengers before. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s shocking primary victory in New York over House Democratic Caucus Chairman Joseph Crowley raised the question: Who could be the next incumbent Democrat to go down? Ocasio-Cortez and her allies are hoping it will be Missouri Rep. William Lacy Clay

Four Democrats, including Clay, will be on the primary ballot Tuesday for the St. Louis-based 1st District, but the nine-term congressman’s biggest threat comes from nurse and activist Cori Bush. Ocasio-Cortez traveled to St. Louis to campaign with Bush, who casts herself as part of a new generation of bold progressive leaders. 

Pelosi Urges House Democrats to ‘Own August’ Over Recess
Leadership introduces toolkit to help members draw an economic contrast with GOP

The office of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic Policy and Communications Committee have sent a messaging toolkit to members to use in their districts over the August recess. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic recruits across the country may be running away from party leadership in their campaigns this summer, but House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has some messaging advice for her colleagues about painting a contrast between the parties ahead of November. 

In a “Dear Colleague” letter circulated Monday, marking 100 days from the midterms, Pelosi stressed the importance of contrasting the Democratic and Republican economic messages when lawmakers are in their districts over recess.

How Left Is Too Left? Kansas Democrats Duke It Out in Must-Win District
Kevin Yoder’s seat is a Democratic target this year

Lawyer Brent Welder, center, rallies with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and New York congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in Kansas City on Friday. (Courtesy Brent Welder for Congress)

Kansas’ 3rd District was recently thrust into the national spotlight as the latest battleground for the soul of the Democratic Party. While local Democrats are divided over the best strategy for the general election, they agree on one thing: It’s a district they have to win to take back the House.

“This is a good example of very ripe territory for Democrats,” said one Democratic operative involved in the race. “And if Democrats are not winning here in November, that’s a very bad sign.”

Opinion: The Numbers Tell the Story — Tax Cuts Work
Recent economic data run counter to the media and Democrats‘ narrative

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, here with Republican lawmakers unveiling the GOP tax plan last September, says Americans have gone from asking “Where are the jobs?” to asking “Where are more workers?” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Last October, not long before passage of the Republican tax cuts, Chuck Todd on “Meet the Press” argued over taxes with his guest, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin.

“There has been no study that has been able to somehow reinforce this idea that tax cuts do translate to economic growth,” the NBC host said.

Opinion: The Wall or the Economy? Time for the GOP to Pick
Electoral certainties that once defined immigration debate for Republicans may be changing

Since the Trump administration began even tougher immigration enforcement against undocumented workers, many business owners have struggled to fill low-wage jobs, Murphy writes. (Chris Carlson/AP file photo)

If you were on the outside looking in, last month’s Republican primary for Georgia governor seemed to feature state Sen. Michael Williams, an immigration hard-liner, against everyone else.

Williams made national headlines when he kicked off his “Deportation Bus Tour,” promising to drive around Georgia, “fill this bus with illegals and send them back to where they came from.” But while Williams got a ton of press from his infamous deportation bus, he got almost no Republican votes. In the end, he finished second to last in the primary with 4.9 percent.

Opinion: There Are No Losers When We Invest in Early Child Care
Americans know what’s at stake and are prepared to support bold action

A teacher interacts with pre-K students at a Maryland learning center in 2014. By wide margins, both liberals and conservatives have concerns over the high cost of quality child care, a new survey found. (Larry French/Getty Images file photo)

Sixty percent of Americans say they expect the next generation will be “worse off” than their own.

That profound sense of pessimism was perhaps the most startling finding of a recent national survey on views about early childhood development.

Sanders’ 2016 Campaign Manager Says He’s ‘Considering’ Another Run
Comes after Vermont independent announced he would run for re-election for Senate

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont speaks at the Center for American Progress’ Ideas conference earlier this month. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Bernie Sanders’ former presidential campaign manager said the Vermont independent is considering another presidential run.

“Nationally, he is considering another run for the presidency. When the time comes, I think we’ll have an answer to that. But right now he’s still considering it,” said Jeff Weaver, who managed Sanders’ 2016 campaign.

Trump Nominee Has Blasted Lawmakers, Mormons, Immigrants
Mortensen wrote for ‘nativist hate group,’ Southern Poverty Law Center says

President Trump’s expected nominee for a State Department post has been harshly critical of Arizona’s two GOP senators, John McCain (left) and Jeff Flake. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Civil rights groups are calling on senators to reject President Donald Trump’s intention to put a former foreign service officer who has harshly criticized immigrants — along with U.S. religious leaders and key GOP lawmakers — into a State Department role overseeing refugees and migrants.

The White House announced its intention to nominate Ronald Mortensen to be assistant secretary of state for population, refugees and migration on Friday afternoon, as much of Washington and the country was starting a holiday weekend. But several influential immigration advocacy groups noticed — and quickly urged the Senate to block the nomination.