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Leahy tears up committee rulebook after Graham pushes immigration vote
‘Tear them up,’ the Vermont Democrat says

Sen. Patrick Leahy tears up a copy of the Senate Judiciary Committee's rules of procedure as ranking member Dianne Feinstein and Chairman Lindsey Graham look on during a markup of the Secure and Protect Act of 2019 on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham pushed forward a committee vote Thursday on an immigration bill, despite protests from the panel’s Democrats that he was breaking the rules.

Getting handsy: Why are senators waving their hands about on the Senate floor?

CQ Roll Call's Leadership Editor, Jason Dick, imitates the Mutombo Menendez as he explains the nuance behind floor votes in the Senate. Nathan Ouellette/CQ Roll Call

Senators can get a little animated with their hands at times when voting on the Senate floor and sometimes it becomes difficult to determine which way they're trying to vote.

Angus King gives Susan Collins a rose after her 7,000th Senate vote

Sen. Angus King offers a rose to his Maine colleague, Sen. Susan Collins, after her 7,000th Senate vote.

Republican Sen. Susan Collins cast her 7,000th vote on the Senate floor Tuesday, having never missed a roll call vote since joining the Senate in 1997.

Capitol Ink | EZ Ballot

Ryan Downplays Broken Immigration Promise As a Delay
Promised July vote on agriculture guest worker program would've failed

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., says a promised July vote on an agriculture guest worker bill did not happen because it would've failed and that members will spend August continuing to build support for the measure. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Downplaying his failure to deliver on a promised July vote on a bill to expand an agriculture guest worker program, Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Wednesday it would’ve failed. 

House Republicans plan to spend their August recess working on getting the votes to pass the bill, the Wisconsin Republican said on “Fox & Friends.“ 

GOP Messaging Vote on Democrats’ ‘Abolish ICE’ Bill Set to Backfire
Democrats prepared to vote ‘no’ and make debate about family separations

From left, Reps. Luis V. Gutiérrez, D-Ill., Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., John Lewis, D-Ga., Judy Chu, D-Calif., Al Green, D-Texas, Adriano Espaillat, D-N.Y., and others march in Washington on June 13 to protest the Trump administration’s family separation policy at the southern border. Rep. Joseph Crowley, D-N.Y., appears in the back at center. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders are planning a vote this month on a progressive bill to terminate the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, but their plan to put Democrats on record on an issue that divides the minority party looks like it will backfire. 

Democrats say they’ll make the debate about families that have been separated at the border — an issue that needs a permanent legislative fix that Republicans do not yet have a solution for that can pass the House.

How House Members Voted on the Omnibus Versus the Budget Deal
More Democrats, including Pelosi, switch to ‘yes’ on omnibus from ‘no’ on budget deal

House Democratic leadership team was split on the omnibus. While Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi supported the bill, Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer, right, voted against it.. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

More Democrats and fewer Republicans voted for the fiscal 2018 omnibus Thursday than voted for the budget deal that set the spending levels for it.

The House passed the $1.3 trillion omnibus spending bill, 256-167, with 145 Republicans and 111 Democrats voting “yes.” The “no” votes came from 90 Republicans and 77 Democrats.

Power Brokers: Hoyer on Clinton’s Emails, Gun Control
 

Rock the Vote — Where 'Kimye' and Politics Collide

Keeping up with the latest Kardashian gossip and knowing the difference between the names on your ballot aren’t mutually exclusive.

At least not for Ashley Spillane, the president of Rock the Vote, a national nonprofit that has organized get-out-the-vote efforts for more than two decades, including a national voter registration day on Tuesday.