Vermont

Cummings, CBC to Trump: Wrong!
Maryland Democrat has "no idea" why Trump said what he did

Cummings said he is not sure why Trump made up an anecdote about him at a press conference. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, D-Md., says President Donald Trump is making things up when he said he backed out of a meeting with the president.

Trump, answering a question at his Thursday press conference about whether he would include the Congressional Black Caucus in his agenda for inner cities, went off on a tangent about how he was supposed to meet with Cummings but that the Maryland Democrat decided against it because of politics.

Mike Pence Is the Oath-Administrant in Chief
Trump delegates swearing-in of Cabinet members mostly to VP

Vice President Mike Pence, far right, delivers a ceremonious oath of office to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson last week in the Oval Office as Tillerson’s wife Renda St. Clair and President Donald Trump look on. (John T. Bennett/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump stood just to his vice president’s right as Mike Pence delivered a ceremonial oath of office to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. The same scene played out eight days later as Pence officially swore in Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Thursday.

One of Pence’s most regular duties, three weeks into the Trump administration’s tenure, is introducing his boss before public remarks. Almost as often, though, Pence is the oath-administrant in chief.

Word on the Hill: The New City That Never Sleeps?
Twitter trolling

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and his colleagues seem to be working nonstop. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senators seem to never go home these days, and you can find people walking around the Capitol at all hours of the night.

Senate Carryout and the Refectory have opened earlier and remain open later than usual. Capitol Police and workers around the complex have had extended shifts.

Word on the Hill: How Would D.C. Fare in Trade War With Mexico?
A great place to take a nap

D.C. has the least amount of imports from Mexico as a percentage of total imports. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Except for Alaska, the District of Columbia would be least affected by the economic fallout of a trade war with Mexico, a new study shows.

The most affected states would be Texas, Arizona, and Michigan, according to the WalletHub study. D.C. ranked 50th, just ahead of Alaska.

Warren Blocked From Speaking During Sessions Confirmation Debate
Republicans say Massachusetts Democrat impugned AG nominee

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren was directed to not speak for the remainder of the debate on the nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions to be attorney general. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 10:22 p.m. | Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and liberal firebrand Sen. Elizabeth Warren clashed on the chamber floor Tuesday evening, with the Kentucky Republican moving for the Massachusetts Democrat to take her seat.

Senators voted along party lines, 49-43, to uphold a ruling of the chair, blocking Warren from speaking for the remainder of the debate on confirmation of fellow Sen. Jeff Sessions as attorney general.

Trump Advisers’ Infrastructure Plan Has Big Risks
Could reward investors in projects

President Donald Trump's pick for U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross worked on Trump's proposal for infrastructure (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo).

An infrastructure plan put together by two advisers of President Donald Trump could carry potential risks, economists and transportation experts say.

The plan is based on a paper by Trump economic adviser Peter Navarro, who is director of the National Trade Council, and Wilbur Ross, Trump's pick for Commerce Secretary that was set before the election.

Grassley Outlines Timeline for Confirming Trump’s SCOTUS Nominee
Judiciary chairman anticipates a six week process

President Donald Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court Judge Neil Gorsuch, looks on as Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, speaks to reporters following their meeting in the Capitol on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley is laying out his plan to get Judge Neil Gorsuch on the Supreme Court before the Easter recess.

The Republican from Iowa has a roughly six week timeline for getting Gorsuch, the 10th Circuit appellate judge from Colorado who was named Tuesday night by President Donald Trump, as his choice to replace the late Antonin Scalia on the highest court.

Major Trading Alliance Wobbles on Trump Border Wall
Texas Republican: Wall is ‘most expensive and least effective’ solution

Rep. Will Hurd’s district in Texas includes 800 miles along the U.S.-Mexico border. (CQ Roll Call photo)

It soon could fall on congressional Republicans to plead with President Donald Trump to rescind Thursday’s pay up-or-else threat to Mexican leaders.

Trump used a morning tweet to respond to Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s rejection of the new U.S. president’s Wednesday directive to begin “immediate” construction of a wall along the countries’ 2,000-mile border.

Staffer Guide: Stay in Touch
Jonathan Smith tells staffers to do your best with the job you have

Jonathan Smith is chief of staff to Washington Rep. Derek Kilmer. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Jonathan Smith moved up from intern to chief of staff on Capitol Hill by never losing touch with people with whom he has worked.

Now chief of staff to Washington Democratic Rep. Derek Kilmer, Smith started as a college intern, first for then-state Sen. Gary Peters, and later for Sen. Carl Levin, both Michigan Democrats. 

Elizabeth Warren Emerges as GOP Boogeyman
Republicans are eager to tie vulnerable Democrats to Massachusetts liberal

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has been invoked in early GOP attacks so far against vulnerable Democratic senators even though she isn’t likely to face a competitive re-election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A Massachusetts poll making the rounds this week implied that Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren may be in trouble in 2018. But without a declared challenger, it’s hard to see much danger on the horizon for Warren in a blue state. 

The bigger question is not whether Warren is well-liked in her own state, but whether she’s disliked enough in other states to be a liability for Democrats facing re-election in places President Donald Trump won last year.