trade war

House Republicans Want Trump to Curtail Tariff Plans, Avoid Legislation
Many in GOP want to avoid a ‘direct affront’ to the president, Sanford says

Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady have urged President Donald Trump not to move forward with sweeping tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans want President Donald Trump to scale back his plan to institute sweeping tariffs on steel and aluminum imports — apparently so they can avoid taking legislative action against him.

Speaker Paul D. Ryanis urging the president not to move on the plan he announced Thursday to impose a 25 percent tariff on steel imports and a 10 percent tariff on aluminum imports. 

Paul Ryan ‘Worried About the Consequences of a Trade War’
Spokeswoman says speaker doesn’t want to jeopardize gains of new tax law with tariffs

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., has concerns about President Donald Trump’s plan to impose new tariffs on imported steel and aluminum. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan is urging President Donald Trump to reconsider his plan to institute tariffs on imported steel and aluminum, the highest-ranking Republican to push back on the plan. 

“We are extremely worried about the consequences of a trade war and are urging the White House to not advance with this plan,” Ryan spokeswoman AshLee Strong said. “The new tax reform law has boosted the economy and we certainly don’t want to jeopardize those gains.” As speaker, Ryan is second in line to the presidency, after the vice president, under the Constitution. 

Capitol Ink | Davos 2018

Ep. 48: Why Trump is Slow-Walking His Trade Policy
The Week Ahead

President Donald Trump is taking his time reshaping his trade policies, says CQ Roll Call's trade reporter Ellyn Ferguson. She provides valuable insight on where things stand with the president’s campaign pledges to rip up NAFTA and officially label China as a currency manipulator — neither of which has happened.


Capitol Ink | Economic Fortune Cookie