Trade

Sessions on the Cusp of Martyrdom or Oblivion
If he’s fired, will former Senate GOP colleagues draw a line against Trump?

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been the target of almost daily taunting from President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When Jeff Sessions was preparing last fall to begin a third decade in the Senate, his future as a rock-ribbed conservative legislative force looked limitless, but just three seasons later, he’s been pushed to the precipice of his career.

The almost daily taunting he’s taking from President Donald Trump points toward one of two probably quick endings to his brief run as attorney general, quitting or getting canned.

The True and Bonkers Story About When Kid Rock Met Mitt Romney
Former deputy campaign manager disputes accounts of policy discussion

Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney greets musician Kid Rock during a campaign rally in Michigan in 2012. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images file photo)

As Detroit singer and rapper Kid Rock continues to tease a run for the Senate, a former Mitt Romney campaign aide told the story about how the man known as the American Bad Ass met with the man who could have been the first Mormon President.

Katie Packer Beeson served as Romney's deputy campaign manager in 2012 and is a native of Michigan, where Romney grew up and Kid Rock calls home.

Health Care, Tax Overhauls Drive Lobbying in Trump Era
“We’re feeling really confident going into the second half of the year”

During the turbulent first six months of the Trump administration, some of the biggest lobbying groups scaled back their spending as his signature initiatives collapsed. But major agenda items, including a tax overhaul, will continue to fuel K Street work.

Other wish-list items in the coming months will include a measure to raise the nation’s debt limit, funding the government for fiscal 2018, and continued negotiations about shoring up the nation’s health care system, even as Republican efforts to dismantle the 2010 health care law have cratered.

Opinion: Meet the New President — All 50 of Them
Governors filling void created by a distracted Trump

The nation’s governors, including Nevada’s Brian Sandoval, left, and Virginia’s Terry McAuliffe, are stepping into a leadership void created by a distracted President Donald Trump, Murphy writes. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images file photo)

There was a time very recently when governors ran the states and the president ran the country. For every ribbon-cutting and fish fry a governor attended in his home state, the president was doing the big stuff — signing on to international accords, negotiating with world leaders, and leaning on Congress, especially the senators of his own party, to push through his policy agenda on Capitol Hill.

But those days are over, at least for now. While President Donald Trump has become engulfed in questions about his campaign’s associations with Russia and more focused on his Twitter feed and widescreen TV than the mundane, sustained work required to move an agenda, the governors of America have stepped into the void.

Word on the Hill: D.C. Job Fair Announced
Veggie dogs and ‘An Inconvenient Sequel’

D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton tells you what you need to bring to the fair. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., announced Tuesday that her annual job fair for residents of the District will be on Aug. 2. The event is free and includes employers from D.C., Maryland, and Virginia.

“Whether you are a D.C. resident looking for a job, or even a new, better job, our Fair is the place for you,” she said in a news release. 

Tiptoes on the Hill Back Into War Debate
A bipartisan push for Trump to seek fresh authority to combat terrorism

Soldiers with the New York Army National Guard patrol in New York City’s Penn Station in June following a terrorist attack in London. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Sixteen years on, Congress seems to be getting genuinely close to forcing itself into a fresh debate on how to prescribe the use of military force against terrorism.

Writing a new war authorization will not happen before the end of the year, meaning those deliberations would be influenced by the dynamics of the midterm election campaign. But proposals to force the issue onto the agenda have the potential to blossom into sleeper hits on this summer’s remarkably blockbuster-deprived roster of consequential legislation.

White House’s ‘Made in America’ Week to Test Trump’s Focus
 

Word on the Hill: The Week Ahead
Your social calendar for the week

Vice President Mike Pence greets tourists as he walks down a back stairway near the meeting room where Senate Republicans unveiled their new version of health care plan last week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Welcome back to another busy full week of Congress.

Health care is the talk of the town and starting today, an assortment of liberal groups are holding “People’s Filibuster” rallies on Capitol Hill to oppose the Senate Republican effort to repeal the 2010 health care law.

Trump Stances Could Affect Cross-Border Energy Trade

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, arrives to chair the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing on near-term outlook for energy and commodity markets on Tuesday, jan. 19, 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When President Donald Trump signed an executive order in April to impose a tariff on Canadian softwood lumber, the administration and its supporters heralded the move as an equalizing measure meant to bolster domestic timber production.

For Trump, the tariff was the latest move meant to build on his “America First” campaign platform. The action his administration took amounted to a tariff in the form of an import tax totaling around 20 percent for softwood lumber imports from Canada. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross estimated the measure could result in $1 billion a year from Canadian lumber imports, which make up about one-third of the U.S. lumber market.

Trump Defends Eldest Son During Chummy Day with Macron
'Most people would have taken that meeting,' U.S. president declares

French President Emmanuel Macron (left) welcomes U.S. President Donald Trump prior to a meeting and joint press conference at the Elysee Presidential Palace on Thursday in Paris. (Photo by Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Thursday uttered his first verbal public defense of his eldest son’s decision to take a meeting with what was described to him as a “Russian government attorney” to discuss dirt on Hillary Clinton.

His comments came during a remarkably chummy day with new French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris. The two slapped backs and exchanged numerous handshakes and laughs in front of journalists, vowing enhanced counterterrorism cooperation during a joint press conference.