Tony Cardenas

It was a good hare day for Rep. Tony Cárdenas
California Democrat is co-sponsor of the Humane Cosmetics Act

Sara Amundson, president of the Humane Society Legislative Fund, holds Paxton, a 4-year-old rescue rabbit, during an event at the Rayburn Building on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

What has two ears, continuously eats and can barely stay still? No, not me (but not a bad guess).

I’m referring to the rabbits that took over Capitol Hill on Tuesday morning. The Humane Society Legislative Fund, along with other animal advocacy groups, hosted around a dozen “House” bunnies in the Rayburn foyer.

Rep. Tony Cárdenas spent $148,000 fighting dropped civil lawsuit
California Democrat still has over $20,000 left that will likely go to outstanding balances

California Rep. Tony Cárdenas has spent well over $100,000 on legal expenses for a lawsuit that was dismissed. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Politicians can pay a heavy price when they’re accused of sexual misconduct — even when the case is dismissed. Just ask California Democratic Rep. Tony Cárdenas.

He racked up almost $150,000 in legal expenses defending himself against a lawsuit that alleged he sexually assaulted a minor. In July, the alleged victim agreed to have the case dismissed with prejudice, meaning that she can’t file it again. But that doesn’t wipe out those expenses, even when the case is dropped.

Woman drops sexual abuse case against Rep. Tony Cárdenas
Cárdenas says ‘the truth prevailed’; plaintiff says she wishes she would have chosen a better lawyer

Rep. Tony Cardenas, D-Calif., hailed the resolution of the sexual abuse case against him, saying “the truth prevailed.” It's unclear if he will face a House ethics investigation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The sexual abuse case against Democratic Rep. Tony Cárdenas reached a resolution, but the reason remains unknown to the public.

The woman who accused Cárdenas of molesting her as a 16-year-old dropped her civil case against the congressman on Wednesday. A Los Angeles Superior Court judge granted her request that it be dismissed with prejudice, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Nationalization question hangs over White House’s 5G announcement
FCC chair reiterates his agency’s stance that a free-market approach is the key to beating China in ‘the race to 5G.’

From left, chairman Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., shakes hands with Ajit Pai, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, before the start of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on Aug. 16, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Announcing the latest phase of his plan to implement a fifth-generation broadband network throughout the United States, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai on Friday reiterated his agency’s stance that a free-market approach to implementation is the key to beating China in “the race to 5G.” 

Nationalizing 5G and selling spectrum access wholesale, as some have proposed — including President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign manager — is “the wrong answer for American consumers at the end of the day,” Pai told reporters on a conference call.

Rep. Paul Gosar wants to redesignate Cesar Chavez Day as ‘National Border Control Day’
The resolution reflects a priority of the Center for Immigration Studies

Rep. Paul Gosar is fighting a lawsuit from constituents he once blocked on Facebook. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Cal file photol)

Arizona Republican Rep. Paul Gosar introduced a resolution last week to designate the birthday of Cesar Chavez, March 31st, as “National Border Control Day.”

Many celebrate the birthday of Chavez, the iconic co-founder of the United Farm Workers union born to a Mexican American family, as a day to reflect on the dignity of agricultural workers and the contribution of Latinx immigrants to the United States.

House voice vote to end government shutdown sows confusion, anger and eventually reconciliation

Rep. G. K. Butterfield, D-N.C., right, and House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., right, was presiding over the chamber when the back and forth over the voice vote on ending the shutdown went down.  (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It seemed simple: The House on Thursday passed a continuing resolution that would reopen nine Cabinet departments through Feb. 28 on a voice vote, a result that devolved into partisan sparring on the floor as Republicans sought to vacate the vote and Democrats said, in effect, too bad. By the end, both sides hugged it out, vacated the initial vote, voted by voice again, and postponed a roll call vote until Wednesday. 

It all started with passage, via voice vote on the resolution. Then the gavel came down, ending the vote. 

Woman suing Rep. Tony Cárdenas for sexual abuse makes her name public, inspired by Christine Blasey Ford
Trial will begin in August in Angela Villela Chavez’s suit against Cárdenas

A woman accusing Rep. Tony Cárdenas, D-Calif., of sexual abuse has made her name public for the first time. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The woman suing Rep. Tony Cárdenas, alleging that the California Democrat sexually abused her when she was a teenager, has made her name public for the first time. And she was inspired to do so by the Senate testimony of Christine Blasey Ford against now-Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh last year, according to a new report.

A trial will begin in August in 28-year-old Angela Villela Chavez’s civil suit against Cárdenas in Los Angeles County.

Bipartisan Group Wants Labs to Disclose Where Research Animals End Up
Federal agencies asked for info on adoptions and retirements for dogs, cats and primates that survive experiments

Rep. Erik Paulsen, R-Minn., led a bipartisan group of lawmakers in sending a letter to federal agencies about testing on dogs, cats and primates. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Update 10:12 a.m. | A bipartisan group of lawmakers urged federal agencies and research labs to release information on what it does with cats, dogs and primates that survive experiments.

The letter first obtained by Roll Call was sent to the Department of Interior, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration, the Smithsonian Institution, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Defense.

Cárdenas Faces Calls to Resign Ahead of Primary
Judge allows civil suit from minor who says congressman touched her in 2007 to proceed

Protesters called on Rep. Tony Cardenas, D-Calif., to resign amid allegations of sexually abusing a teenage girl in 2007. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic Rep. Tony Cárdenas faced calls to resign ahead of California’s primary next month amid  after a judge allowed a civil suit accusing him of sexually abusing a teenage girl in 2007 to move forward.

Around 20 protesters descended on Cárdenas’ office in Van Nuys on Monday, saying they believe his accuser, the Los Angeles Daily News reported.

Hoyer Fine With Cárdenas Remaining in Leadership While Abuse Allegations Investigated
Democratic whip says his view would be different if Cárdenas were in a role where he spoke for the party

House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., are not calling on Rep. Tony Cardenas to step down from his leadership position amid child sex abuse allegations raised against him that he denies. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer does not believe that Tony Cárdenas needs to step down from his leadership role over allegations that he sexually abused a 16-year-old girl in 2007 when he was serving on the Los Angeles City Council.

Cárdenas, who has denied the allegations raised against him in a lawsuit filed last month, serves in an elected leadership position House Democrats created in 2016 for a member serving for five terms or less to have a seat at the leadership table. The California Democrat is the highest-ranking lawmaker to be accused of sexual misconduct to date.