Tom Graves

Members Bond Over ‘Miserable’ Workout
Nine members of Congress did Solidcore with HOH

Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema exercise together before work. (Thomas McKinless/ CQ Roll Call)

As lawmakers traded harsh words over the omnibus, some were also trading bipartisan high-fives.

In the middle of last week’s spending clash, nine members took a break for a hard-core workout. HOH joined them for an early morning Solidcore class. 

Congress Could Split Payments to Broadcasters Over Two Years
Thune, Walden explore compensating spectrum moves over longer period of time

Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., says members are exploring spreading out payments to broadcasters for spectrum moves from one year to two. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Chairman John Thune says authorizers and appropriators are exploring whether to compensate broadcasters for giving up spectrum over two years rather than one, a change that could make it a more palatable item in spending bills.

The South Dakota Republican, who is also chairman of the Senate Republican Conference, and House Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden, R-Ore., are trying to secure about $1 billion to compensate broadcasters for giving up one part of the spectrum and move to another. But appropriators are balking at the sum.

2 Guns, Bible Stolen From GOP Rep. Tom Graves’ SUV in Atlanta
Bank information and sensitive ID documents also among items taken

Rep. Tom Graves, R-Ga., reported multiple stolen items, including two guns, from his SUV last weekend in Atlanta. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Two guns, a driver’s license, credit cards, birth certificates, a laptop, and a Bible were among the items stolen last weekend from an SUV that belongs to Rep. Tom Graves of Georgia, Atlanta police said.

The Republican congressman and staffer Travis Loudermilk returned to Graves’ GMC Yukon last Saturday night in downtown Atlanta and drove at least a mile before they discovered the items were missing, according to a police report obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Take Five: Karen Handel
‘One of the greatest moments ever’ was when Donny Osmond called her about Mitt Romney

Rep. Karen Handel, R-Ga., says there’s a Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde syndrome in Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Freshman Rep. Karen Handel, 55, a Georgia Republican, talks about her friendship with Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, her intense race for the House and her love of football. 

Q: What has surprised you so far about Congress?

With Tax Deal in the Works, Questions Turn to Timing
Deal could be announced as early as Tuesday, with votes next week

Capitol Hill was relatively calm Tuesday morning, as Washington braced for the results of the Alabama Senate election and timing on a vote on tax overhaul and spending is in flux. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Capitol Hill was relatively calm Tuesday morning, even as the timing on two big-ticket items — voting on a tax overhaul package and what to do about year-end spending questions — hung in the air unresolved and the nation remained fixated on Alabama’s special Senate election, where voting is underway.

House Republicans meeting as a conference at the Republican National Committee headquarters said there was no specific timeline for voting on the tax package, as the formal conference committee is set to meet, perhaps for the only time, Wednesday.

Freedom Caucus Seeks to Delink Tax and Spending Negotiations
Members threatened to sink motion to go to conference on tax overhaul

Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows says there’s growing consensus for a longer stopgap funding bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Freedom Caucus on Monday threatened to sink a motion to go to conference on the tax overhaul — a procedural move they had been pushing for — in an attempt to negotiate a longer stopgap funding bill to delink upcoming tax and spending deadlines.

But in the end, all but one member of the 36-member hard-line conservative caucus voted for the motion to go to conference after Chairman Mark Meadows had a conversation off the floor with Speaker Paul D. Ryan, and other caucus members huddled on the floor with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy. Michigan Rep. Justin Amash was the only caucus member to vote against the motion, which was agreed to, 222-192.

Photos of the Day: Trump on the Hill Ahead of Tax Bill Passage
Thursday, Nov. 16, in photos

President Donald Trump and Speaker Paul D. Ryan leave a meeting with the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on Thursday to discuss the House GOP tax bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated at 2:10 p.m.| The House voted Thursday on a GOP plan to overhaul the U.S. tax code. The bill passed 227-205, with 13 Republicans voting against their party’s plan (here’s Roll Call’s full coverage of the vote).

Before the vote, President Donald Trump was at the Capitol to meet with the conference and discuss the bill. 

House Republicans Told Tax Details Are Coming
Ryan says outline being prepared

From left, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, Reps. Tom Graves of Georgia and Michael McCaul of Texas, and House Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers conduct a news conference in the Capitol on Wednesday after a conference meeting. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House and Senate tax writers plan to release the week of Sept. 25 an outline detailing their points of consensus with the administration on how to overhaul the tax code, Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Wednesday.

The Wisconsin Republican said House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady announced the intent to release more details of the still-developing tax overhaul plan during Wednesday’s House Republican Conference meeting.

House GOP Disgruntled Over Path on Spending Bill
Divisions over latest plan to break omnibus into chunks

Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., thinks Republicans will end up where they usually do: with a continuing resolution for the appropriations process until they can strike a deal after the start of the fiscal year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Much of the congressional focus lately has been on Senate Republicans’ intraparty divisions on health care, but House Republicans are having struggles of their own on other issues. And the frustration is mounting.

The House GOP Conference faced its latest setback Wednesday after their leadership announced the previous evening that they would move a four-bill, security-related appropriations package on the floor next week instead of a measure combining all 12 appropriations bills.

GOP Leaders Want Vote on National Security Appropriations Bills
Move suggests lack of support to pass full omnibus

Rep. Tom Graves, R-Ga., wanted the House to pass an omnibus spending bill before the August recess, but GOP leaders are pushing for a vote just on a package of national security-related appropriations bills. (Bill Clark/Roll Call)

House GOP leaders on Tuesday announced a plan to have the chamber vote next week on a package of national security-related appropriations bills.

The announcement comes as a blow to several GOP lawmakers who had been pushing for the House to pass a 12-bill omnibus spending bill before the August recess.