Tim Ryan

Pelosi Suggests Democrats Hold Leadership Elections After Thanksgiving
Move would allow time for incoming freshman ‘to get oriented,’ she says

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., holds her weekly press conference in the Capitol on Thursday, July 12, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi sent a dear colleague letter to House Democrats Friday suggesting the caucus wait until after Thanksgiving to hold its leadership elections for the next Congress. 

The letter may seem strange coming four months in advance of the lame-duck session during which intraparty leadership elections would be held, but according to a Democratic leadership aide members had been inquiring about the timing of the caucus elections, so the letter was meant to clear the matter up.

House Democrats Contemplate Post-Pelosi ‘Bridge’
Tim Ryan considers challenging Pelosi; members discuss idea of bridge speaker

From left, Democratic Caucus Chairman Joseph Crowley, D-N.Y., Assistant Democratic Leader James E. Clyburn, D-S.C., House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., and House Minority Leader Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talk after a news conference in May. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Some House Democrats have begun to talk more openly about the possibility someone other than Nancy Pelosi may be their leader next year — although, for now, she is still the odds-on favorite to continue leading the caucus. 

Leadership jockeying has picked up steam in the wake of House Democratic Caucus Chairman Joseph Crowley’s primary loss last month. The New York Democrat had been seen by many as a potential successor to Pelosi one day.

Ryan, Huizenga Quarrel Over Civility of Immigrant Separation Debate
Republican Huizenga takes offense at Democrat Ryan’s calling separation policy ‘state-sanctioned abuse’

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, had a spat with Rep. Bill Huizenga, D-Mich., over the rhetoric surrounding undocumented immigrant children separated from their families at the border. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Reps. Tim Ryan and Bill Huizenga had a brief spat at a news conference Thursday over the rhetoric surrounding undocumented immigrant children who have been separated from their parents.

Huizenga, a Michigan Republican, joined Ryan and two other Democrats on a visit to Bethany Christian Services in Grand Rapids, an organization providing room and board to some undocumented children.

Embattled Pruitt Out as EPA Chief
Senate now has another Cabinet post to process in an election year

Scott Pruitt testifies during his Senate Environment and Public Works Committee confirmation hearing in January 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is the latest Trump administration Cabinet official to be ousted or abruptly leave, after his resignation was accepted Thursday by President Donald Trump.

“Within the Agency Scott has done an outstanding job, and I will always be thankful to him for this,” the president tweeted. 

Washington Misses Out on Chance for Queens vs. Queens
Joe Crowley’s loss means no New York state of mind for Pennsylvania Avenue

Back in the day: Rep. Gary L. Ackerman, D-N.Y., right, joins Joseph Crowley in 1986 at Crowley’s victory party for winning a seat in the New York State Assembly. (Courtesy Rep. Joseph Crowley’s office/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The spectacle of politics and how it fits, or doesn’t, into the nation’s culture. Subscribe to our newsletter here.

Ah, what could have been: Two boisterous guys from Queens hurling insults at one another. 

Public Sector Union Clout May Suffer After Janus Case
As fee requirement falls, unions’ political influence could follow

Illinois state employee Mark Janus stands outside the Supreme Court after hearing the decision in Janus v. AFSCME. The court ruled in his favor, throwing doubt on the future of public sector unions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Public sector unions, a backbone of organized labor’s political and policy influence, likely will face serious belt-tightening that could ultimately diminish their staffing and clout after one of the most consequential decisions of the Supreme Court’s term held that unions can no longer impose fees on nonmembers.

Representatives for unions and their conservative foes alike say they plan to take up new publicity campaigns in the aftermath of the court’s decision in Janus v. American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. Unions will promote the benefits of union membership while their opponents will highlight to workers that they need not pay the collective-bargaining fees any longer.

Cedric Richmond Isn’t Sure How Much Is Left in the Tank
Democrats’ star hoping another pitcher gets elected in midterms

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond, D-La., is cooled by Rep. Pete Aguilar, D-Calif., after running out a triple, then scoring on an error Thursday night at the Congressional Baseball Game. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Much of the Democrat’s 16-run win Thursday night at the 57th annual Congressional Baseball Game can be attributed to pitcher Cedric L. Richmond. But the game’s most dominant player for the last several years isn’t sure how much longer he can dominate.

When asked if he can keep up his streak year after year, the Louisiana Democrat said, “Absolutely not.”

Congressional Baseball Game Highlights
57th annual Democrats vs. Republicans game for charities at Nationals Park in Washington

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, tags out Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., at third base during the 57th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park on Thursday. The Democrats prevailed 21-5. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic members of Congress beat their Republican counterparts, 21-5, Thursday in the annual Congressional Baseball Game for Charity at Nationals Park in Washington.

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond pitched a complete game for the Democrats, who won 11-2 last year. 

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing on Capitol Hill?
Green is watching; Flake is a grad dad; and new art to hang

From left, Reps. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., and Ed Perlmutter, D-Colo., leave the Capitol after the last votes in the House before the Memorial Day recess on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. Some of the best are ones we come across while reporting the big stories.

There is life beyond legislating and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

Voters Challenge Ohio Congressional Map as Partisan Gerrymander
Supreme Court expected to rule on similar cases before term ends in June

Ohio Rep. Joyce Beatty represents the 3rd District, which the lawsuit says is “shaped like a snowflake.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Civil rights groups and Ohio voters filed a lawsuit Wednesday challenging the state’s congressional districts as unconstitutional, as the Supreme Court readies decisions in similar cases about whether maps can be rejected if they entrench an advantage for one party.

The lawsuit, filed by the American Civil Liberties Union in U.S. District Court in Cincinnati, seeks a new congressional map for Ohio. But it almost certainly comes too late in the 2018 election cycle to affect districts ahead of the November vote. Ohio already held its primary election under the current map on May 8.