Tim Ryan

Tim Ryan was once a star quarterback, with Congress as his backup
Ohio Democrat recalls how he got his start on Capitol Hill

Before he was a congressman, Ohio’s Tim Ryan was an intern and a staff assistant for his predecessor, Rep. James A. Traficant Jr. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Tim Ryan “caught the bug” for Congress first as a summer intern in 1994 and then as a staff assistant the following year for a fellow Ohioan, the late and colorful Democratic Rep. James A. Traficant Jr.

He recalls meeting Traficant during his senior year in high school, when Ryan was the star quarterback of his team. The two bonded over their football experiences. Ryan was recruited to play for Youngstown State, but an injury cut short his college football career. 

Gabbard won’t run again for House seat, stays in presidential race
Four-term Hawaii representative has clashed with fellow Democrats over military and foreign policy issues

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, told supporters she would not seek reelection to the House and urged them to support her bid for the presidential nomination (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Tulsi Gabbard, the last House member still in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, said Thursday she would not seek reelection for her Hawaii seat.

“I believe I can best serve the people of Hawaiʻi and our country as your President and Commander-in-Chief,” she said in an announcement posted on Twitter.

Tim Ryan drops presidential bid, will run for reelection in House
Ohio Democrat had struggled to raise money, qualify for debates

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan is dropping his bid for the presidential nomination and will seek another House term. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan on Thursday became the latest Democrat to drop out of the race for the party’s presidential nomination, announcing in a tweet that he would seek a 10th term in the House instead. 

“I got into this race in April to really give voice to the forgotten people in this country,” he said in a video posted online. “I’m proud of this campaign because I believe we’ve done that.”

First it was lawmakers, now Members’ Dining Room has to deal with Yelp
Restaurant has frequently been subject of lawmaker criticism, scrutiny

The House Members’' Dining Room in the Capitol is now open to the public during recess. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House Members’ Dining Room has historically served only lawmakers and their guests in a private annex on the first floor of the Capitol. But over the past year the restaurant has opened its doors, first to Capitol Hill staffers and now to the general public to dine — not like kings, but like members of Congress.

Other restaurants with tough-to-get tables may have Michelin stars or James Beard Award-winning chefs. The House restaurant, despite its privileged pedigree, has tough critics and a troubling track record on profitability.

Path to defeat Trump ‘doesn’t flow through the coast,’ Bullock tells teachers group
Despite sagging poll numbers, Montana governor forges ahead with 2020 presidential pitch

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, center, greets Randi Weingarten, left, president of the American Federation of Teachers, and Darrell Capwell, before a town hall at the AFT on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Montana governor and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Steve Bullock didn’t qualify for the debate stage in September, and he is polling near the bottom of the 20 remaining White House hopefuls.

But at the American Federation of Teachers headquarters in Washington, D.C., Bullock said Thursday he can win back Trump voters from the American heartland while retaining support in traditional liberal strongholds. The self-described populist moderate with executive experience spent time taking questions from the audience focused on education issues. 

HOH presents: the ultimate congressional fantasy football juggernaut
Here are the current and former members of Congress who would dominate

Then-Rep. Jon Runyan, R- N.J. left, blocks for the “Mean Machine” team at the Congressional Football Game for Charity, which pits congressmen against police, in 2011. In the background is then-Rep. Heath Shuler, D-N.C. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Have you ever wondered which current or former members of Congress would make the ideal fantasy football team? Well, we’ve got you covered.

For hardcore football fans, playing fantasy can be an exercise in cognitive dissonance. If you are a Baltimore Ravens fan who has Ben Roethlisberger at quarterback, you have to pray the Steelers QB throws four TDs while the rest of the team plays like garbage. But there is no better feeling than agonizing over setting the perfect lineup and then watching your team light up your enemy, er, opponent. And for perhaps the ultimate in cognitive dissonance, Heard on the Hill presents the All-Congress fantasy football team.

Tim Ryan misses next presidential debate, but has a backup plan
Still running for president, the Ohio Democrat scheduled a fundraiser for his simultaneous congressional campaign

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, has scheduled a fundraiser for his House campaign account while continuing to campaign for president. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After failing to qualify for next month’s televised Democratic presidential debate, Rep. Tim Ryan pledged to keep his White House bid going, but his simultaneous congressional campaign is gearing up for an upcoming fundraiser at a Capitol Hill townhouse.

The Ohio Democrat, who has two separate campaigns for the 2020 elections, is inviting lobbyists and others to a Sept. 25 fundraising reception to benefit his congressional reelection bid, according to a recent invitation obtained by CQ Roll Call. The event is also listed on a rundown of upcoming events distributed by House Democrats’ campaign committee.

Personal experience with guns helps shape how 2020 Democrats talk about them
Presidential candidates are united on background checks, but split on buybacks, licensing

Minnesota senator and Democratic presidential hopeful Amy Klobuchar cites her state’s hunting traditions when speaking about her plans to combat gun violence. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For some Democratic presidential candidates, hunting is a family affair. Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan says he hunts ducks “at least once a year, with our oldest son.” Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, who hunts deer, talks about “creating lifelong memories with our kids.”

Family, tradition and personal hunting experience are integral to the way these candidates speak about guns — and how they pitch gun control measures to voters from areas of the country with a strong history of gun ownership.

Moulton drops out of 2020 Democratic presidential race
Massachusetts congressman says he’ll focus on reelection, supporting party’s presidential nominee

Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., gives a high five to a spectator during the Boulder City Damboree Celebration 4th of July parade in Boulder City, Nev., on July 4. Moulton focused primarily on foreign policy and national security during his presidential run, which ended Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Massachusetts Democrat Seth Moulton, who ran on a centrist, pro-military platform that never ignited the Democratic base, on Friday became the fourth Democratic presidential candidate to drop out of the race.

During his brief bid, Moulton, an Iraq veteran and former Marine infantry officer, focused primarily on foreign policy and national security. He defined himself as one of the more moderate candidates in a field that now numbers 21.

What lawmakers can do about gun violence, and helping black families save ancestral lands
CQ on Congress, Episode 165

A demonstrator holds a sign on the East Front of the Capitol during the student-led March for Our Lives rally on Pennsylvania Avenue to call for action to prevent gun violence in March 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Public pressure on lawmakers is growing across the country to reduce gun violence, but Congress may only be able to pass incremental legislation, explains CQ Roll Call’s legal affairs writer Todd Ruger.

In the second segment of this podcast, we explore how Congress and a South Carolina center are trying to address the loss of land and wealth, particularly among African Americans, in what is commonly referred to as Heirs Property. Josh Walden of the Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation in South Carolina discusses how thousands of acres of land, from the south to Appalachia, may be in dispute because of the lack of legal records.