Thom Tillis

Gallagher Steals Fastest Lawmaker Title From Cotton
Blumenauer staffer first overall finisher

Texas Sen. John Cornyn runs in the ACLI Capital Challenge, a three-mile team race in Anacostia Park in Washington, D.C. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Freshman Rep. Mike Gallagher is the fastest lawmaker in Washington, beating Sen. Tom Cotton, who held the title for four years.

The 33-year-old Wisconsin Republican was the first member of Congress to finish the 36th annual ACLI Capital Challenge in Anacostia Park on Wednesday morning.

ACLI Capital Challenge in Photos: Gallagher is First-Place Member, Cotton Close Behind
The annual three-mile run in Anacostia raises money for the Fidelco Guide Dog Foundation

Rep. Mike Gallagher, R-Wis., prepares for the ACLI Capital Challenge 3 Mile Team Race in Anacostia Park on Wednesday. He was the first member to finish the overall race. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The 36th annual ACLI Capital Challenge is officially in the books for 2017. The 3-mile run at Anacostia Park raises money for the Fidelco Guide Dog Foundation, which pairs guide dogs with people with disabilities, often war veterans. Members of Congress, staffers and press join teams to raise money for the cause.

Tillis OK After Collapse During Capital Challenge Race
Republican senator says he'll be back to work in the Senate

Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., in black shirt, and Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., in yellow shirt, run in the ACLI Capital Challenge 3 Mile Team Race in Anacostia Park on Wednesday. Tillis reportedly collapsed later. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated as of 10:12 a.m. on May 17

Sen. Thom Tillis said he was doing fine after he collapsed during Wednesday morning’s ACLI Capital Challenge road race.

Duckworth Leads Capital Challenge Wheelchair Team to Keep Promise to Herself
Illinois Democrat pledged to do more after losing legs in Iraq

Illinois Sen. Tammy Duckworth competed in her first marathon four years after losing her legs in Iraq. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Serving as captain of the wheelchair team in the 36th annual ACLI Capital Challenge on Wednesday is part of a pledge that Sen. Tammy Duckworth made to herself after losing her legs while serving in Iraq.

“When I was in the hospital, I made a promise to do more than I could before I was wounded,” the Illinois Democrat said. “My recovery goal wasn’t just to get by — it was to go beyond what I thought I could ever do.”

Word on the Hill: Semi-Recess Week
Your social calendar for the week

A television monitor at the TV stakeout shows proceedings on the floor as the House votes to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House staffers get a bit of a break this week.

While the Senate is in session, the House is on recess following a long and stressful week that culminated with the passage of the Republican health care bill. 

Photos of the Week: Senate Goes Nuclear to Confirm Gorsuch
The week of April 3 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell gives a thumbs-up on Thursday after the Senate invoked the "nuclear option" which will allow for a simple majority vote to confirm a Supreme Court justice nominee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The consideration of Neil Gorsuch to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court was front and center all week on Capitol Hill. The final vote for confirmation took place Friday morning, with Vice President Mike Pence presiding over the Senate, but the lead-up had more fireworks — with Majority Leader Mitch McConnell invoking the “nuclear option” on Thursday to lower the threshold of cloture votes needed, effectively clearing the way for Gorsuch’s approval. 

Senate Moves Closer to Supreme Court Showdown on Gorsuch
Graham: ‘If we have to, we will change the rule and it looks like we’re going to have to.’

Sens. John Kennedy of Louisiana, left, and Thom Tillis of North Carolina listen to Minnesota Sen. Al Franken make a statement during a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting Monday on Judge Neil Gorsuch’s nomination to the Supreme Court. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 6:22 p.m. | Long-held Senate rules that require consensus for Supreme Court nominees appear doomed, after enough Democrats announced they would block Judge Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation and force Republicans to alter filibuster rules if they want to put President Donald Trump’s pick on the high court.

The Republican-controlled Senate Judiciary Committee voted 11-9 along party lines Monday, as expected, to favorably advance Gorsuch’s nomination to the Senate floor, but not before key Democrats said they would oppose the 49-year-old federal appeals court judge from Colorado.

Former Sen. Kay Hagan Being Treated for Encephalitis Caused by Tick
North Carolina Democrat hospitalized in D.C. in December now getting treatment at Atlanta center

Former Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., suffered encephalitis that is caused by a virus spread by ticks to humans. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former North Carolina Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan's encephalitis was caused by a virus spread by ticks to humans, doctors and her family said.

Hagan’s family said it knows the recovery process is long, but they are optimistic about the progress she has made, the News & Observer in Raleigh reported.

Mike Pence Is the Oath-Administrant in Chief
Trump delegates swearing-in of Cabinet members mostly to VP

Vice President Mike Pence, far right, delivers a ceremonious oath of office to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson last week in the Oval Office as Tillerson’s wife Renda St. Clair and President Donald Trump look on. (John T. Bennett/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump stood just to his vice president’s right as Mike Pence delivered a ceremonial oath of office to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. The same scene played out eight days later as Pence officially swore in Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Thursday.

One of Pence’s most regular duties, three weeks into the Trump administration’s tenure, is introducing his boss before public remarks. Almost as often, though, Pence is the oath-administrant in chief.

Word on the Hill: D.C. Rated Fourth Best in Highway Safety Laws
Restaurant opening in the DMV

Despite how you feel about your morning commute, D.C. has good highway safety laws. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy February! Here’s some good news — your commute around Washington, D.C., isn't as bad as you think.

The Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety named their best and worst states when it comes to 15 basic highway safety laws. South Dakota was the worst, followed by Wyoming and Arizona.