Texas

A Father Drops Off His Son for Congress’ Freshman Orientation
Andy Levin, who will succeed his father in the House, was one of dozens of new members in Washington to learn the ropes

Members-elect from left, Mikie Sherrill, D-N.J., Colin Allred, D-Texas, and Lauren Underwood, D-Ill., arrive for New Member Orientation at the Courtyard Marriott in Southeast Washington on Nov. 13. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Retiring Rep. Sander M. Levin drove away from the Courtyard Marriott in Southeast Washington, leaving his son on the curb in front of the hotel.

It was a true first day of school moment for Michigan Rep.-elect Andy Levin, who will be succeeding his father. As the Democrat made his way into the lobby around 9 a.m. Tuesday morning, the official orientation for new members of Congress was just getting started.

Thank you, Dan Crenshaw
Injured Navy SEAL an example of humor, forgiveness and leadership

That Dan Crenshaw survived his injuries to eventually run for Congress must feel like a miracle, Patricia Murphy writes. (Courtesy Crenshaw for Congress)

OPINION — As a political columnist, the hardest part isn’t finding something to write about, it’s narrowing your focus to just one topic. For today’s column, I could have written about the election mess in Florida, President Trump’s non-attendance at a Veterans Day parade in France, the fact that Nancy Pelosi could soon be second-in-line to the presidency (it could happen), or my complaint that 2020 speculation is the new Christmas decorating (too much too soon).

But after I saw Dan Crenshaw on Saturday Night Live, everything else seemed small in comparison. If you don’t know his name, you will. If you don’t know the story, here it is.

What’s Going On in the Senate This Week
Chamber to take up Coast Guard reauthorization and Federal Reserve nominee

Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., led negotiations on the Coast Guard bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senators return to Washington on Tuesday with plenty of housekeeping to take care of before the 115th Congress comes to close.

Before getting to leadership elections and greeting incoming Senate colleagues, the current class has some legislating left to do. First up is a long-stalled reauthorization of the Coast Guard.

What Will Happen to All Those Beto Signs?
The election cleanup in Texas could take awhile

Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke went all in on yard signs as he ran for Senate. What’s next for all that plastic and poly-coated paper? (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Campaign signs are like Halloween decorations; what went up must come down. In Texas, where losing Senate candidate Beto O’Rourke blitzed the state with his iconic logo, it might take awhile.

“Just driving around, the signs are still everywhere,” graphic designer Tony Casas said Thursday. “He inspired a lot of people, and a lot of people still feel that way after the election.”

Farm Bill Negotiators Aim to Hash Things Out in Veterans Day Meeting
Republicans lost their bargaining edge with the election, Collin Peterson says

Collin Peterson, D-Minn., who will likely take control of the House Agriculture Committee next year, and Mike Conaway, R-Texas, the current chairman, have locked in their plans for Veterans Day. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The two top House farm bill negotiators plan to meet on a federal holiday Monday to try to find a way forward on a compromise measure that could pass a lame-duck Congress.

Collin C. Peterson, currently the ranking member on the House Agriculture Committee and presumed chairman in the 116th Congress, said he and current Chairman K. Michael Conaway of Texas would meet on Veterans Day to discuss the legislation. A Peterson aide on Friday confirmed the Nov. 12 meeting.

Trump Rule Would Bar Asylum Claims by Migrants at Border
Officials claim system is ‘overwhelmed’

U.S. Border Patrol agents pause after chasing and detaining an undocumented immigrant on November 6 in McAllen, Texas. Border Patrol agents on the ground, assisted by a helicopter unit of U.S. Air and Marine Operations agents, detained a group of immigrants who had crossed the border illegally from Mexico. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

The Trump administration is moving to block undocumented immigrants from seeking asylum in the U.S. unless they present themselves at a port of entry, senior administration officials said.

Under the new policy, migrants apprehended illegally crossing the U.S.-Mexico border between ports of entry will not be eligible to seek asylum, said the officials, who spoke to reporters on background because they were not authorized to speak publicly.

There Will Be More Latinos in Congress Than Ever
42 Hispanic members will serve in the 116th Congress

Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington won a fourth term in the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With Washington Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler’s re-election win made official Wednesday night, Congress is set to see its largest ever class of Latino lawmakers. 

There will be at least 42 Latinos serving, between both chambers, come January.

Did the Politics of Division Work? Yes and No
Though America has always seen progress and pushback, this election threatened to push us back a century or two

When we look back at this election, we’ll remember all the “firsts.” But we’ll also remember that time the president called Andrew Gillum, vying to become Florida’s first African-American governor, “not equipped” and a “stone-cold thief,” Curtis writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — Donald Trump is a celebrity president, more interested in declaring a “great victory” after the 2018 midterms than in vowing to bring the country together. As he sparred with the media Wednesday and bragged about outdoing Barack Obama, Oprah Winfrey and famous folks who stumped for the other side, he did his best Rodney Dangerfield routine, playing the aggrieved president who has all the power but gets no respect.

When asked about the violent episodes that shook America in the weeks before Nov. 6 and whether he should soften his tone, he boasted about the economy, said he was “sad” to see the violence, and then talked about his great relationship with Israel.

In Suburban Strongholds, Blue Wave a Republican Wipeout
Democrats expected to hold over two thirds of suburban House seats next year

Democrat Jennifer Wexton, flanked by her mother, Paula Tosini, and husband, Andrew, delivers her victory speech Tuesday night after defeating GOP Rep. Barbara Comstock in Virginia’s 10th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Tuesday’s midterm elections have done more than surge Democrats into a respectable House majority: It also wiped out a large chunk of Republicans’ support in suburban strongholds, portending a significant shift in the political alignment of white suburbanites in the Trump era.

Almost all of the House Democratic gains came from the suburbs: They are projected to flip over two dozen seats in primarily suburban districts, sweeping out once-comfortable Republican incumbents including Reps. Pete Sessions in Texas, Peter Roskam in Illinois, and Erik Paulsen in Minnesota.

Stivers Not Running Again for NRCC Chairman
Stivers’ decision comes after Republicans lose House control

Rep. Steve Stivers, R-Ohio, is not seeking a second term as NRCC chairman. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Steve Stivers will not seek a second term as head of House Republicans’ campaign arm. Republicans lost control of the House on Tuesday.

“I am extremely proud of the work the Members, candidates, and NRCC team have done over the last two years. It is because of their hard work that we prevented a large Democrat majority,” he said in a statement thanking the NRCC team for their “tireless efforts” this cycle.