Ted Cruz

Senate Republicans Became More Bipartisan in the Last Congress — Democrats, Not So Much
Report places Sen. Bernie Sanders as the least bipartisan senator

Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, talk before a committee hearing. Collins was identified in a report as the most bipartisan senator of the 114th Congress. The report ranked Warren 88th. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats, once happy to rail against what they called obstructionist Republicans in the chamber, flipped positions with their friends across the aisle when it came to partisanship in the 114th Congress.

A new report from the Lugar Center and Georgetown University shows that most senators — almost two-thirds of the chamber — acted more bipartisan when it came to cosponsorships on bills during the most recent Congress, compared to the Congress before.

Jon Ossoff, Karen Handel Advance to Runoff in Georgia Special Election
Democrat Ossoff falls short in bid to win race outright Tuesday

Democrat Jon Ossoff and Republican Karen Handel will meet in the June runoff. (Photos by Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ATLANTA — With Tuesday turning into Wednesday, Democrat Jon Ossoff has fallen short of the majority needed to win outright in the Georgia special election primary and is headed for a June runoff against Republican Karen Handel.

With 88 percent of precincts reporting, Ossoff had 48 percent to Handel’s 20 percent in the 18-candidate field in the 6th District, The Associated Press reported. 

A Republican Favorite, NASA Escapes Trump’s Budget Ax
‘A lot of the NASA facilities are in Republican states and districts’

Space Shuttle Discovery takes its last flight on the back of a 747 over Washington on April 17, 2012. (Douglas Graham/Roll Call file photo)

This story first appeared on CQ.com on April 17, 2017.

Space exploration was left relatively unscathed when President Donald Trump released his first budget request in March — especially when compared with other science and technology programs.

Republican Wins Tough First Special Election of Trump Presidency
Ron Estes wins seat vacated by CIA Director Mike Pompeo

Republican Ron Estes underperformed President Donald Trump in Kansas’ 4th District on Tuesday night. (Courtesy Kansas for Estes Facebook page)

In the first congressional election of Donald Trump’s presidency, Republicans have held on to a deeply red Kansas district after a closer than expected race for the GOP. 

Ron Estes, the state treasurer, defeated Democratic lawyer James Thompson 53 to 46 percent in Kansas’ 4th District, with 100 percent of precincts reporting, The Associated Press reported.

Trump Steps Into Closer-Than-Expected Kansas Special Election
National Republicans have made late investments in heavily GOP district

Kansas Treasurer Ron Estes is the Republican nominee in Tuesday’s 4th District special election. (Courtesy Kansas for Estes Facebook page)

It’s not often that a sitting Republican president, vice president, a former presidential candidate and senator and the speaker of the House make an effort days before a special election to hold what’s supposed to be a safe GOP seat. 

“Today, the eyes of the whole country are on Kansas,” Texas Sen. Ted Cruz said at a Monday rally for state Treasurer Ron Estes, the GOP nominee in the 4th District.

Republicans Attack Each Other in Race for Price’s Seat
Attention on Democrat Jon Ossoff increases as special election nears

Former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel can’t ignore her Republican opponents in Georgia’s 6th District special election. (Screenshot Karen Handel for Congress via YouTube)

Republican candidates are going after each other, with some arguing over who can most sound like President Donald Trump in the week ahead of the special election primary in Georgia’s 6th District.

Karen Handel, widely seen as the GOP front-runner, is the target of a six-figure ad buy by the conservative Club for Growth Action, which backs rival Bob Gray. The ad tags the former Georgia secretary of state as “a big-spending, career politician we can’t trust with our money.” 

Toppling Cruz Will be a Tall Order for O’Rourke
But supporters call him a ‘giant slayer’

Rep. Beto O'Rourke, D-Texas, left, gained national attention when he and Texas Republican Rep. Will Hurd livestreamed their road trip from their home state to Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke on Friday became the first Democratic challenger to Sen. Ted Cruz in what will be an uphill fight between the possibility of a primary to toppling a conservative hero in a deep red state.

In announcing his candidacy in his hometown of El Paso, O’Rourke said the incumbent was putting his own interests ahead of his constituents, saying he would be “a senator who is not using this position of responsibility and power to serve his own interest, to run for president, to shut down the government,” and said the state needed “a senator who is working full-time for Texas.”

Report: O’Rourke to Announce Cruz Challenge on Friday
Would be a long shot against national conservative leader in red state

Rep. Beto O'Rourke, D-Texas, will announce his candidacy for Senate on Friday against Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Texas Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke will reportedly announce his challenge to Sen. Ted Cruz in what will be a long shot race.

O’Rourke sent out an email to supporters on Wednesday saying he will make “a big announcement” on Friday. Sources told the Houston Chronicle that O’Rourke will announce his Senate bid in his hometown of El Paso then.

Senators Working the Ref Already on Health Care Bill
Parliamentarian rulings could make or break GOP legislation

Sen. Bill Cassidy is among the senators looking to make sure any health legislation or amendments will comply with the Senate’s procedural rules. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As House Republicans struggle to cobble together the votes to pass legislation to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, members are already looking to navigate the Senate’s labyrinth of procedural rules that could make or break the measure. 

Senate Democrats are already setting up for the battle with the parliamentarian about which provisions could run up against the Byrd Rule, which requires budget reconciliation bills that can pass with a simple-majority vote to be primarily about spending and revenues, without extraneous matter.

McConnell: ‘We’re Not Slowing Down’ on Obamacare Repeal

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., heads to the Senate floor as he leaves the Senate Republicans' policy lunch on Tuesday, March 21, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

BY ERIN MERSHON and JOE WILLIAMS, CQ Roll Call

This story originally appeared on CQ.com.