Taxes

Taxes, Immigration Bigger Tests for Ryan Speakership Than Fiscal Deal
Conservatives concerned about how speaker will handle DACA

Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s leadership will be tested in upcoming debates over taxes and immigration, potentially determining whether he remains the House’s top Republican. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s leadership capabilities are back in the spotlight after September’s fiscal crises were quickly resolved last week without any wins for conservative policies. But that deal is unlikely to define his speakership the way upcoming legislative battles on taxes and immigration will.

Whether the 10-term Wisconsin Republican remains speaker — either by his or the House GOP’s choosing — may depend on his ability to deliver legislation in those areas that can both appease his largely conservative conference and get through the more moderate Senate to President Donald Trump’s desk.

Podcast: GOP Clashes Could Complicate Tax Deal
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 30

President Donald Trump is making overtures to centrist Democrats like Sens. Jon Tester and Heidi Heitkamp. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican lawmakers are eager to craft a budget resolution that would ease passage of a tax overhaul, but already divisions are emerging. CQ budget reporters Paul Krawzak and Ryan McCrimmon explain the many moving parts.

Show Notes:

Podcast: New Capitol Hill Trifecta
The Week Ahead, Episode 69

CQ's budget editor David Lerman and Roll Call's Senate leadership reporter Niels Lesniewski explain the policy and political impact of the deal struck between President Donald Trump and Democratic leaders to resolve several thorny government spending issues simultaneously.

Harvey Aid Package Adds to Full House Agenda
Debt limits talks have potential to divide Republicans

House GOP leaders plan to begin finishing the appropriations process on the floor and possibly passing a relief package for Hurricane Harvey in September. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the House returns from its summer recess, Republicans are looking to pass the eight remaining appropriations bills soon, which would complete a GOP omnibus they hope will serve as an opening bid for negotiations with the Senate.

The chamber might also take quick action on an initial supplemental appropriations measure to provide money for Hurricane Harvey recovery efforts. An additional package or two will likely be needed as Harvey’s full impact is assessed.

Analysis: Why Recent Tax Overhaul Efforts Failed and This One May, Too
Republicans taking tax message on the road this week without details

House Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp, second from right, and Senate Finance Chairman Max Baucus, third from right, speak with executives at an appliance store in Lawrence, N.J., during a stop on their 2013 tour to promote their tax overhaul effort. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The last time Republican tax writers unveiled legislation for overhauling the tax code, it elicited this telling response from the speaker of the House: “Blah, blah, blah, blah.”

It was Feb. 26, 2014, and the House Ways and Means Committee had just unveiled a tax overhaul discussion draft, with full legislative text and both dynamic and static scores from the Congressional Budget Office.

Tax Overhaul ‘Ain’t Going to Happen’ If Not by Thanksgiving, Meadows Says
Freedom Caucus chairman says it would be difficult to support corporate rate above 20 percent

House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows, R-N.C., says a tax overhaul needs to complete by Thanksgiving or it will not happen. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows endorsed Wednesday the White House’s aggressive timetable for overhauling the tax code, saying the effort will die if a bill doesn’t pass before Thanksgiving.

“If we do not have a bill that we’re actually debating in September [that] hopefully gets a vote in October, it will not get to the president’s desk by Thanksgiving. … If it doesn’t get there by Thanksgiving guys, it ain’t going to happen,” the North Carolina Republican said to a crowd of conservative activists at an Americans for Prosperity rally at the Newseum. 

'Mooch' is Out, General In at White House
 

House Republicans’ August Messaging Plan: Deflect and Pivot
Recess resource kits highlight bills House GOP passed, tax overhaul plans

Speaker Paul D. Ryan and House Republicans plan to spend August touting bills they’ve passed and their plans to overhaul the tax code. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans left Washington largely stumped about how to go home for a monthlong recess and defend to their constituents Congress’ failure to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law. 

The concerns were so great that many members during a GOP conference meeting Friday — just hours after a Senate vote on a scaled-back repeal bill failed — pleaded with leadership to keep the House in session in August.

White House Talks Tax Outreach, but Senators Guarded
Legislative director outlines ambitious timetable

White House legislative affairs director Marc Short, left, here with Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso last week, has hopes for a bipartisan tax overhaul effort. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll)

The White House sees Democrats up for re-election in states President Donald Trump won as possible partners in their effort to overhaul the tax code, but Senate Republicans appear less optimistic about the chances of a bipartisan bill.

White House legislative director Marc Short said Monday the White House is not wed to using the often partisan reconciliation process to advance a tax overhaul, though senators were hesitant to rule out that procedural tool.