tax bill

Brady Says Ways and Means Will Work With Trump on 10 Percent Middle-Class Tax Cut
Tax writing chairman’s statement comes after Trump already suggested Brady was working on it

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, says his panel will work with President Donald Trump and his administration to craft the mysterious 10 percent middle-class tax cut bill the president has been talking about lately. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump must’ve spent some time offstage Monday night in Houston talking up his new middle-class tax cut idea to Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, because the House chief’s tax writer has agreed to take on the project. 

In recent days Trump has started talking about working with Congress on new tax cut legislation focused on providing further relief to the middle-class. He initially said a measure would be unveiled before November 1, revised that to after the election and then reversed the time back to next week.

Senate Tax Positions Prevail in Conference, House GOP Doesn’t Care
Concerns muted amid political imperative to achieve a legislative victory

Senate Finance Chairman Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, left, and House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, led negotiations on the GOP tax overhaul conference committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The tax overhaul conference report looks a lot like the Senate bill. Senate negotiators prevailed on most of the major issues — and House Republicans say they’re fine with that.

House Republicans interviewed for this story said they will support the final product despite it being very different from the one they voted on in November, with reasons ranging from specific provisions they championed to the overall benefits of the sweeping package.

David Hawkings’ Whiteboard: How Two Bills Become One Law
 

Ready or Not, House Republicans Set Vote on Tax Overhaul
But floor delay remains a possibility as GOP leaders wrangle votes

Speaker Paul D. Ryan said the health care debate taught him not to set an “artificial deadline” for passing legislation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The scenario is all too familiar: House Republican leaders schedule a floor vote on a major legislative priority and exude confidence the bill will pass despite a chorus of rank-and-file concern. 

GOP leaders insist the tax overhaul they plan to vote on this week is different from the health care bill they had to pull from the floor this spring. But the reality is they are still wrangling the 218 votes needed to pass their tax measure. A possible repeat scenario of the health care debacle looms.