Susan Collins

Heller ‘Will Not Support’ Draft Senate GOP Health Bill
Nevada Republican joins chorus of senators raising concerns over proposal

Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., listens as Secretary of Commerce nominee Wilbur Ross Senate testifies during his confirmation hearing in the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By JOE WILLIAMS and BRIDGET BOWMAN, Roll Call

Sen. Dean Heller came out in opposition Friday to draft legislation released Thursday that would overhaul the U.S. health insurance system, teeing up a major battle for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell

The ‘Wait and See’ Caucus vs. the ‘Not Yet’ Quartet
Republicans show wide range of reaction to health care draft

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul was one of four Republican senators who said he wouldn’t support the current Senate health care bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The divisions among Senate Republicans on their health care bill to change the U.S. health insurance system can be summed up as the interests of the “Wait and See” caucus versus the “Not Yet” quartet.

Four members on Thursday, just hours after the text of the draft was posted online, said they are “not yet ready” to vote for the proposal that would make significant changes to the Medicaid program and alter some aspects of the current health care law.

Word on the Hill: Watergate Anniversary
Harris to be recognized

From left, Connecticut Sen. Lowell P. Weicker Jr., Florida Sen. Edward J. Gurney, Chief minority counsel (and later senator) Fred Thompson, Tennessee Sen. Howard H. Baker Jr., North Carolina Sen. Sam J. Ervin Jr., Chief counsel Samuel Dash, Georgia Sen. Herman E. Talmadge, Hawaii Sen. Daniel K. Inouye, D-Hawaii, and New Mexico Sen. Joseph M. Montoya during the Senate Watergate hearings. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s been 45 years since Watergate and the landmark hotel where it all began wants to talk about how the scandal reverberates today.

Rakel Cohen, co-owner of the hotel, is hosting a “Watergate Chat” Wednesday evening with The Atlantic’s Steve Clemons to discuss the break-in and how it relates to current politics. 5 p.m. at The Watergate Hotel (2650 Virginia Ave. NW)

Podcast: In Comey We Trust?
The Week Ahead, Episode 57

It’s Seersucker Time
National Seersucker Day kicks off summer Thursday tradition in the Capitol

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., celebrates National Seersucker Day during a group photograph in the U.S. Capitol in 2015. Along with McConnell are from left, Sens. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., Bill Cassidy, R-La., Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., Susan Collins, R-Maine, Thad Cochran, R-Miss., Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., and Roger Wicker, R-Miss. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Summer in Washington means Seersucker Thursdays in the Capitol.

The longstanding tradition started as a way to keep cool in the D.C. swamp in the summer but has turned into a time for bipartisanship and camaraderie.

Democrats Wary of GOP Health Care Hedging
Minority party not inclined to let up on criticism

From left, Democratic Sens. Ron Wyden of Oregon, Christopher S. Murphy of Connecticut, Chris Van Hollenof Maryland and Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts kept up their attack on the GOP health care plan Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans are increasingly cautious about handicapping their quest to repeal the 2010 health care law, but their Democratic colleagues have no intention of letting up on criticism of the GOP’s goal of gutting former President Barack Obama’s signature domestic achievement.

Democrats have been holding near-daily press conferences outlining concerns they have with the legislation that narrowly passed the House last month.

The Real 13 Senators to Watch on Health Care
The moderates, conservatives and Democrats who will influence how the Senate bill gets shaped

By JOE WILLIAMS and RYAN KELLY

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s 13-member health care working group has gotten a lot of attention. But in the Senate, where a minority group of members can effectively stall any legislation from advancing, buy-in from the broader Republican Conference will be necessary for the GOP to succeed in overhauling President Barack Obama’s signature domestic policy achievement, the 2010 health care law.

Republicans Return From Recess Under Health Care Time Crunch
Key decisions on Obamacare repeal bill will need to be made in the coming weeks

From left, Sens. Cory Gardner of Colorado, and John Thune of South Dakota, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn conduct a news conference after the Senate policy luncheons in the Capitol on Feb. 28. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican senators return on Monday from a 10-day recess with immediate decisions to make on their quest to overhaul the 2010 health care law.

While Senate leaders have largely avoided putting any artificial timelines on their endeavor, the GOP is under an extreme time crunch to produce and advance their own legislation to match the House bill that narrowly passed the chamber last month.

Cassidy Faces Criticism on Health Care at Town Hall
Constituents ask for a stand on climate change

Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., faced criticism for his proposed health care bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy faced criticism for his proposed replacement for the 2010 health care law at a town hall.

 Cassidy, a physician, read handwritten questions and allowed for follow-ups at the Covington, Louisiana meeting Wednesday night, according to the Associated Press.

Policymakers Face Pressure to Act on Drug Pricing
Some proposals appear likely to gain traction

Indiana Sen. Todd Young leaves a Senate Republican policy lunch in the Capitol in February. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A proposal that would open the door for the import of low-cost prescription drugs from Canada was defeated at a Senate markup Thursday, but the proposal is unlikely to be gone for good. Lawmakers from both parties seem to want to demonstrate concern about drug prices to voters.

The administration also appears interested in addressing the issue, with Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price holding listening sessions with patient groups and think tanks in recent weeks.