Steve Stivers

Chaffetz Won’t Seek Re-Election in 2018
Outspoken Utah Republican won’t rule out run for governor in 2020

Utah Republican Rep. Jason Chaffetz is the outspoken chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Rep. Jason Chaffetz announced Wednesday that he will not run for re-election to his House seat or any other political office in 2018. But he’s not ruling out one in 2020.

The Utah Republican said in a Facebook post that there were “no ulterior motives” behind the move, and he was confident he would still be re-elected by wide margins, had he decided otherwise.

Word on the Hill: Happy Friday
Books, restaurants and trees

This week was taken up with debate over the Republican repeal and replace health care effort. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

After a busy week on the Hill, there’s a lot to do off the Hill this weekend to chill out.

Temperatures are supposed to reach 75 degrees in the District on Saturday, so it will be a great time to check out what’s left of the Cherry Blossoms on the Tidal Basin.

Montana Republicans Pick Gianforte to Run for Zinke’s Seat
Ran for governor in 2016

Greg Gianforte is Montana Republicans' choice to replace former Rep. Ryan Zinke after Zinke's selection as Secretary of Interior. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Montana Republicans have nominated their nominee for governor last year to run for the state’s at-large House seat.

Greg Gianforte received the majority of delegate votes at the party’s nominating convention in Helena. Gianforte will run against Democrat Rob Quist for the seat vacated by Ryan Zinke, who was tapped by President Donald Trump to be secretary of Interior.

Republicans Identify Vulnerable Members for 2018
NRCC announces initial round of Patriot Program

Minnesota freshman Rep. Jason Lewis is part of the NRCC’s initial Patriot Program. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The National Republican Congressional Committee has named 10 members to its Patriot Program for incumbents who are expected to face tough re-election races in 2018.

“Our Patriots are a group of battle-tested members who won hard-fought races in 2016 and are ready to win once again,” Rep. Steve Stivers, the NRCC chairman, said in a statement Wednesday. 

Kansas GOPers Pick Establishment Candidate for Pompeo Seat
State Treasurer Ron Estes chosen over a Trump campaign staffer

Kansas Treasurer Ron Estes is likely the next congressman from the 4th District. (Courtesy Kansas for Estes Facebook page)

Ahead of the first special election of Donald Trump’s presidency, a small group of Kansas Republicans has effectively handpicked an establishment-backed candidate as the next congressman from the Wichita-based 4th District.

At a special nominating convention Thursday night, 126 district committeeman elected state Treasurer Ron Estes to be the GOP nominee for the open seat, which was vacated by Mike Pompeo after his confirmation as CIA director. Estes received 66 votes on the final ballot.

Stivers to Tighten NRCC Budget and Cap Salaries
National Republican Congressional Committee Chair Redirects Resources

NRCC Chairman, Steve Stivers, intends to cap salaries and tighten other expenses. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Steve Stivers announced during a House GOP conference meeting Tuesday morning that he plans to implement a 10 percent across the board cut to operating costs and a staff salary cap at the NRCC, a source close to him told Roll Call.

The cut is designed to ensure as many of the NRCC’s resources go to members and races where they’re needed, the source said.

GOP Hits Streets of Philadelphia
Issues retreat takes on new meaning with control of White House

House and Senate Republicans gather in Philadelphia starting Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Democrats gathered in Philadelphia for their 2016 convention, they likely couldn’t conceive that Republicans would be meeting in the same city six months later with President Donald Trump and firm control of the House and Senate.

But the annual issues conference, a joint retreat for the House and Senate GOP that starts Wednesday, will take on new significance now that Republicans have control of both sides of Capitol Hill and the White House. 

NRCC Names First Female Head of Recruitment
New York Rep. Elise Stefanik will help find 2018 candidates

New York Rep. Elise Stefanik will be the NRCC’s vice chairwoman for recruitment. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Steve Stivers has named New York Rep. Elise Stefanik the committee’s vice chairwoman for recruitment for the 2018 election cycle. 

Stefanik is the first woman to lead recruitment efforts for the party, a significant appointment given that the GOP trails Democrats in the number of women in Congress. Democrats have 62 female members in the House, while Republicans have just 21.

House Republicans Entrust Majority to Rogers at NRCC
New York native begins fourth cycle at committee, but first as executive director

John Rogers was part of the National Republican Congressional Committee team that limited the party’s losses in the House to a net of just six seats in last year’s election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Midterm elections are supposed to be trouble for the president’s party, but House Republicans are confident that if they have a problem, John Rogers can solve it.

Rogers was born in Amsterdam, New York, a small-town about a half-hour west of Albany, but Republican friends know him best for once identifying an unlikely takeover opportunity three hours south in New York City.

Is There Space for a Republican EMILY’s List?
Litmus tests might not work the same way on the right

Alabama’s Martha Roby is one of only 26 Republican women in Congress. Some party members wonder if they need their own version of EMILY’s List to increase that number. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As recently as the second Reagan administration, Republicans had more women in Congress than Democrats. Then EMILY’s List took hold.

The political action committee, founded in 1984, dedicated itself to electing Democratic women who support abortion rights, becoming an influential force in primaries even when it clashed with the wishes of party leaders. Now, of the 104 women in the 115th Congress, 75 percent are Democrats.