Steve Daines

How Senators Spend Their Fourth of July
Sens. Schumer, Daines, Murkowski, and Scott on their favorite traditions

A Capitol Visitor Center tour guide points up in front of John Trumbull's “Declaration of Independence” painting in the Capitol Rotunda on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

HOH reached out to several senators to see how they celebrate Independence Day.

After the anticipated vote on the Senate Republicans’ health care bill was postponed, senators may be eager to have a celebratory weekend.

Rural Areas Brace for Health Care Bill Impact
Senate GOP bill could undermine health insurance coverage

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, is concerned her state's residents could lose out on health insurance safeguards. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Senate historically has paid special attention to the needs of rural areas, but as the chamber readies its health care bill, there are concerns that the bill would undermine coverage in those places more than anywhere else.

While the exact text of the Senate bill is not yet posted publicly, all signs point to somewhat similar language to the House bill (HR 1628), which would reduce funding for Medicaid compared to current law and impose caps on Medicaid funding. Under the House bill, older people also would face higher premiums — and rural areas tend to be home to a large number of older Americans.

Ivanka Trump, Senators Hope to Push Family Tax Credits
Rubio: ‘Paid family leave is a part of it’

Ivanka Trump walks with Florida Sen. Marco Rubio to a meeting at the Capitol with Republican senators on paid family leave on Tuesday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

A group of Senate Republicans met with Ivanka Trump on Tuesday to begin constructing a tax credit package that could include family leave and other child care proposals. 

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who touted paid family leave during his 2016 presidential run, said lawmakers and President Donald Trump’s eldest daughter discussed a variety of tax proposals meant to benefit families, particularly those who are low-income.

Race Rating: 2018 Montana At-Large Race Starts as Leans Republican
Gianforte not in immediate danger of losing re-election

Montana Rep.-elect Greg Gianforte is a favorite for re-election next year. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images file photo)

It’s not good to start your tenure in Congress with a misdemeanor assault charge, but that’s where Republican Greg Gianforte finds himself. It also doesn’t mean he is immediately and automatically vulnerable in 2018.

On May 25, Gianforte won a special election to replace Republican Ryan Zinke (who vacated his seat to become secretary of the Interior) in a race that received some national attention but went viral after an altercation between the candidate and a reporter resulted in assault body-slamming allegations and formal charges. Gianforte pleaded guilty on June 12 and narrowly avoided a few days in jail with 40 hours of community service and 20 hours of anger management counseling.

Republican Senators Unaware of Health Care Details
Several have no knowledge of specific policy leadership is considering

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has kept details of the health care deliberations close to the vest. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Several Republican senators have no knowledge of the specific policy proposals GOP leadership is weighing for inclusion in the pending legislation to overhaul the U.S. health care system.

The lack of widespread knowledge among members about the exact policy under review calls into question whether Republicans will be able to advance a bill before the Fourth of July recess, the timeline that GOP aides say Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is operating under.

Lawmakers Seek to Restore Internet Privacy After Repealing It
Move comes after waves of consumer concerns

Legislation by Tennessee Rep. Marsha Blackburn would restore some of the internet regulations Republicans in Congress just repealed. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House and Senate lawmakers are hoping to push legislation to replace recently repealed Obama-era internet privacy regulations, a move by the Federal Communications Commission that has led to a tide of consumer complaints.

At least two Senate bills are being drafted to address the regulatory void and public outcry created last month when congressional Republicans repealed internet privacy rules issued by the FCC last year, using the Congressional Review Act. With the repeal, internet service providers such as Comcast and Verizon can use and sell their customers’ online internet activity for marketing purposes unless consumers specifically request to opt out.

Big Spending in Montana Portends a Close Election
Two flawed candidates battle for at-large district Thursday

Republican congressional candidate Greg Gianforte speaks to supporters during a campaign meet and greet Tuesday in Great Falls, Montana.  (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Updated 9:48 p.m. | Ahead of Thursday night’s “body-slamming” incident, most bets were on Republican nominee Greg Gianforte, who’s led by single digits in recent public and private polling, winning Montana’s at-large House seat on Thursday.

But that’d still be a dramatic shift from President Donald Trump’s 20-point victory in the state last fall.

Word on the Hill: Capitol Artwork Wrapped
Former congresswoman joins NYU, and conservative senators get ranked

Paintings have been wrapped on the Senate side of the Capitol during testing of a new smoke control system. (Niels Lesniewski/CQ Roll Call)

You may have noticed that some paintings and busts around the Capitol are covered in a plastic wrapping.

The artwork located in the corridors and grand stairwells of the Capitol are all covered for their protection during the testing of the new smoke control system

Meet the Dogs of the Senate
Canine friends in Fischer, Isakson, Rubio and Daines’ offices

Jabber has been Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson’s office dog since May 2015. (Courtesy Isakson’s office)

President Harry Truman once said, “You want a friend in Washington? Get a dog.” There are a few Senate offices that are full of friends.

A few dogs hang out regularly either as official “office dogs,” or because they belong to staffers who enjoy bringing in their pooches.

Word on the Hill: Staffers’ Chance to Check Out African-American Museum
Ryan adds speaking gig next week

The National Museum of African American History and Culture opened in September. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is having an open house this morning for staffers.

The open house runs from 8 to 10 a.m. The museum, located at 1400 Constitution Ave. NW, opened in September and continues to be an extremely popular attraction for tourists and Washingtonians.