Steve Daines

Big Spending in Montana Portends a Close Election
Two flawed candidates battle for at-large district Thursday

Republican congressional candidate Greg Gianforte speaks to supporters during a campaign meet and greet Tuesday in Great Falls, Montana.  (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Updated 9:48 p.m. | Ahead of Thursday night’s “body-slamming” incident, most bets were on Republican nominee Greg Gianforte, who’s led by single digits in recent public and private polling, winning Montana’s at-large House seat on Thursday.

But that’d still be a dramatic shift from President Donald Trump’s 20-point victory in the state last fall.

Word on the Hill: Capitol Artwork Wrapped
Former congresswoman joins NYU, and conservative senators get ranked

Paintings have been wrapped on the Senate side of the Capitol during testing of a new smoke control system. (Niels Lesniewski/CQ Roll Call)

You may have noticed that some paintings and busts around the Capitol are covered in a plastic wrapping.

The artwork located in the corridors and grand stairwells of the Capitol are all covered for their protection during the testing of the new smoke control system

Meet the Dogs of the Senate
Canine friends in Fischer, Isakson, Rubio and Daines’ offices

Jabber has been Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson’s office dog since May 2015. (Courtesy Isakson’s office)

President Harry Truman once said, “You want a friend in Washington? Get a dog.” There are a few Senate offices that are full of friends.

A few dogs hang out regularly either as official “office dogs,” or because they belong to staffers who enjoy bringing in their pooches.

Word on the Hill: Staffers’ Chance to Check Out African-American Museum
Ryan adds speaking gig next week

The National Museum of African American History and Culture opened in September. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is having an open house this morning for staffers.

The open house runs from 8 to 10 a.m. The museum, located at 1400 Constitution Ave. NW, opened in September and continues to be an extremely popular attraction for tourists and Washingtonians.

The Snapchat Senators
Daines, Murphy, Booker and McCain talk about the social mobile app

Montana Sen. Steve Daines Snapchats in Statuary Hall before President Donald Trump’s address to a joint session of Congress on Feb. 28. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Snapchat was initially established in 2011 and within the last year or so, a few senators have jumped on the social messaging app popular with millennials.

The lawmakers usually send multimedia messages, or snaps, themselves — as opposed to having their staffers do it — and they get pretty creative with what they send to followers.

McConnell: ‘We’re Not Slowing Down’ on Obamacare Repeal

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., heads to the Senate floor as he leaves the Senate Republicans' policy lunch on Tuesday, March 21, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

BY ERIN MERSHON and JOE WILLIAMS, CQ Roll Call

This story originally appeared on CQ.com.

Heard on the Hill This Week: Steve Daines’ Joint Session Snap Story, Tim Scott’s Press Dinner Jokes
 

Roll Call’s Heard on the Hill reporter Alex Gangitano had a busy week in the district, from President Donald Trump’s first address to a joint session of Congress to the annual Congressional Correspondents Dinner. Check out the video for Sen. Steve Daines’ Snapchat story prior to the president’s address, Sen. Tim Scott’s keynote remarks at the congressional dinner and Olympian Michael Phelps’ testimony before the Energy and Commerce Committee.

Senate Democrats Up for 2018 Re-Election Getting Pressed on Gorsuch
Politicians at home join chorus of Senate Republicans pushing for confirmation

Sens. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, left, and Jon Tester, D-Mont., are facing pressure from Republicans back home to confirm Judge Neil Gorsuch. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats up for re-election in 2018 are being pressed by Republicans to confirm President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

In Wisconsin, Gov. Scott Walker criticized Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin for opposing Judge Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation before meeting with him.

House Poised to Block D.C. Suicide Law but Senate May Not Act
Oversight committee approves resolution overturning the law

Ohio Rep. Brad Wenstrup introduced the resolution to overturn the District of Columbia’s assisted suicide law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Monday approved a resolution to overturn a District of Columbia law that would allow doctors to prescribe life-ending drugs to terminally ill patients who request them. The 22-14 vote was the culmination of an emotional markup that pitted Democratic support for local governance against the Republican majority’s assertion of congressional power over D.C. law.

The D.C. law is similar to those in five other states and requires the physician to assert that the patient is mentally competent, along with other safeguards, before the drugs are administered. Mayor Muriel Bowser signed it into law in December after an 11-2 council vote.