staffers

Grassley, Feinstein Issue Subpoena for Manafort Testimony
Committee wants Trump campaign chief to appear on Wednesday

Then-GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump (left) and his then-campaign manager Paul Manafort at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland last July. Senators want to hear from Manafort, possibly this week, about Russia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Republican and Democratic leaders of the Senate Judiciary Committee said Tuesday they saw no choice but to use a subpoena to compel Donald Trump’s former campaign manager, Paul Manafort, to testify on Wednesday.

Chairman Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa, and ranking member Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said in a statement they were “willing to accommodate” Manafort’s requests to cooperate with the committee’s investigation without appearing at Wednesday’s hearing, but they “were unable to reach an agreement” for his desire to provide “only a single transcribed interview to Congress, which would not be available to the Judiciary Committee members or staff.”

Trump Sees Power in Twitter — but Not to Sell Health Care Bill
Since House bill passage, under 10 percent of president’s tweets about health care

As Senate Republicans have struggled to put together their health care legislation, some in the GOP have hoped the president would provide some air coverage through his social media accounts. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump unleashed a Twitter barrage in recent days, reflective of a larger trend that is rankling some Republicans: He has fired off notably more tweets about Russia than ones intended to help sell a Senate Republican health care bill.

Trump is quick to defend his Twitter habit as his best tool to directly reach the American people. Yet, since Senate Republicans grabbed the health care baton in early May, the president has devoted less than 10 percent of his tweets to the measure that is unpopular with the public.

App Challenge Brings Congress, Young Coders Closer
162 members now sponsor district winners in annual competition

Melissa Medina, left, and Arkansas Rep. Bruce Westerman listen to a student demo her winning app in the 2016 Congressional App Challenge. (Courtesy Melissa Medina)

The third annual Congressional App Challenge, in which members feature their young constituents’ entrepreneurial work in the technology field, launches Wednesday.

Student coders have until Nov. 1 to submit entries to their participating members of Congress. 

Word on the Hill: Staffer Corrects 200-Year Mistake
Religion, soccer, cats and dogs as sharks

Staffer Ryan Martin and his family check out the Utah flag before it goes up in the Kennedy Center's Hall of States. (Kennedy Center)

House staffer Ryan Martin noticed at The Kennedy Center that the Utah flag in the Hall of States display wasn’t quite right. A manufacturing error on the flag showed 1647 as the year Mormon pioneers settled in the state, 200 years off from the actual year.

Martin informed the center and a new flag was ordered. The new flag, with the correct year, was raised Monday at a ceremony in the Hall of States. 

Shark Week on the Capitol Means Dogs in Costumes
 

Farenthold: It’s ‘Repugnant’ Female Senators Holding Up Health Care Bill
Says if it was a guy from Texas, they would be settling it ’Aaron Burr-style’

Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, leaves the House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol on Wednesday, May 13, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Texas Rep. Blake Farenthold said it was “absolutely repugnant” that “some female senators from the Northeast” have been a roadblock to the GOP passing a health care bill.

“If it was a guy from south Texas, I might ask him to step outside and settle this Aaron Burr-style,” Fahrenthold told Texas radio station KEYS, The Associated Press reported.

Jared Kushner, After Intel Meeting, Denies Russia Impropriety
Trump son-in-law says no collusion with Kremlin during 2016 race

Jared Kushner, son-in-law and senior adviser to President Donald Trump, leaves the Hart Senate Office Building on Monday after his interview with the Senate Intelligence Committee staff. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

UPDATED 5:15 p.m. | Following nearly three hours of testimony before Senate Intelligence Committee staffers on Monday, senior presidential adviser Jared Kushner stood outside the White House and denied colluding with Russian officials during the 2016 campaign, saying all of his actions were both legal and proper.

President Donald Trump’s son-in-law defended himself during rare public remarks just outside the executive mansion’s West Wing, saying: “I did not collude with Russia, nor do I know of anyone else in the campaign who did so.”

Brooks Touts Steady Stance on Guns Despite Being Shot at
Congressman highlights his experience at Republican baseball practice to show he’s unchanged on Scond Amendment

Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., has a new ad highlighting his unchanged stance on guns despite being at the shooting at the Republican baseball practice. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks is not backing down from an ad describing his experience being shot at.

Brooks is running for the Republican nomination for Senate in Alabama against incumbent Sen. Luther Strange, who was appointed after Jeff Sessions became attorney general.

Kushner to Tell Senators ‘I Did Not Collude’ With Russians
Statement downplays contacts, but shows Trump team’s desire for a thaw with Putin

President Donald Trump’s senior adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner is expected to tell the Senate Intelligence Committee that his meetings with Russians were normal and innocent. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated at 9:06 a.m. | Jared Kushner is set to tell the Senate Intelligence Committee he was unaware that Donald Trump Jr. took a meeting with a Russian lawyer expecting to be given Kremlin-provided dirt on Hillary Clinton.

In prepared remarks the president’s son-in-law and senior White House adviser will deliver to the panel behind closed doors later Monday, Kushner will reject the notion that he or other Trump campaign staffers had nefarious ties with Moscow during the 2016 campaign.

Liberal Group Offers Trump White House Staff Free Legal Advice
‘Lifeline’ comes as president boasts of ‘complete’ pardon powers

President Donald Trump, shown here with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, left, in March at the White House, with son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner and daughter and senior adviser Ivanka Trump, tweeted this weekend he can pardon anyone. (Courtesy Shealah Craighead/White House)

A liberal group will offer Donald Trump’s White House staffers free legal advice amid his ongoing Russia scandal — but if the president’s legal analysis is correct, they might choose to decline it.

Tax March is poised to announce an initiative the organization described as a “lifeline” to those who chose to take positions in Trump’s embattled White House. Under the program, lawyers working on a pro bono basis will provide any White House staffer a “free gateway” to legal advice.