spending

Ep. 46: Border Wall Design Begins and Guess Who Is Paying? Not Mexico.
The Week Ahead

Catch-up here on what is happening with President Donald Trump’s illegal immigration crackdown and plan to build a border wall, including its price tag. The project will involve taking private property and at least $15 billion taxpayer dollars, says CQ Roll Call’s national security reporter Gopal Ratnam. The wall was a cornerstone of Trump’s agenda, but some of his campaign promises on immigration have yet to be realized, adds immigration reporter Dean DeChiaro. @cqnow @rollcall

Show Notes:

Ep. 9: Why Trump’s Budget Could Spark Political Paralysis

Despite the Republicans controlling Congress and the White House, there is no GOP consensus, says CQ Roll Call’s Budget tracker editor David Lerman. That was underscored with some Republicans’ visceral objections to President Trump’s budget requests that could set off a crisis in funding the government, adds Lerman.

Louisiana Lawmakers Make Plea to Obama for Flood Aid
Call to make relief funds part of stopgap funding bill now being negotiated

Sen. David Vitter joined his fellow Louisiana lawmakers in calling on President Barack Obama to make a supplemental funding request to Congress for flood relief for their state. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Louisiana lawmakers want federal dollars to aid in the recovery from devastating recent flooding in their state.

The delegation, led by Republican Sens. David Vitter and Bill Cassidy, are making a plea to President Barack Obama for a timely request.

Veto Likely Over GOP Gitmo Limits in Defense Spending Bill

House Republicans turned the screw this week on President Barack Obama's attempts to shutter the Guantanamo Bay prison before he leaves office.

They even went so far as to declare in legislation that not a single prisoner may leave there.

House Set to Debate Gitmo, AUMF in Defense Spending Measure
White House has concerns with the use of war funds

New Jersey Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen characterized the House fiscal 2017 defense spending bill as "highly responsible." (Bill Clark/Roll Call file photo)

The House began debate late Tuesday on the fiscal 2017 defense spending bill, lining up amendment consideration for the $575.8 billion measure on Wednesday under a veto threat from the White House.    

The House Rules Committee made 75 amendments in order for floor consideration of the bill (HR 5293 ), but rejected two dealing with the rights of LGBT people, two days after an LGBT nightclub in Orlando became the setting for the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.  

House GOP Conservatives, Moderates Seek Consensus on Budget
Goal is to pass budget that would show GOP priorities if it controlled Congress and White House

Texas Rep. Bill Flores, left, seen with Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan predicted leadership could reluctantly get behind a lower budget topline if the majority of the conference backed it. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A group of House Republicans representing viewpoints from across the political spectrum met Tuesday to discuss new ideas for advancing a fiscal 2017 budget resolution.

But the lawmakers acknowledged that a solution would not affect the topline on spending measures the House has already begun moving.

Defense Authorization Debate Begins in House
Prescription monitoring for those with PTSD, military support to Taiwan among amendments scheduled for floor debate

Several of the amendments concern the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

The amendments are part of the debate over how the House will prioritize spending in the fiscal 2017 Defense Authorization .  

The rule also contains a provision that, upon adoption, would automatically modify the bill to strike provisions that would require women between the ages of 18 and 26 to register with the draft. Instead, it would require a report on the current and future need for a centralized registration system for military selective service and whether it should include women.  

Metro Cutting Service for Maintenance
Transit system closing early to fast-track recommended emergency repairs

The entire Washington Metro rail system will close at midnight each day beginning June 3, cutting off daily service hours earlier in order to jump-start emergency repairs requested by federal officials.  

Metro General Manager Paul Wiedefeld last week put forward his plan to address outstanding maintenance issues over the next year. The SafeTrack program proposes closing early on weekends first before shaving hours off commuting routes during the week.