Special Election

At the Races: Things Might Be Getting Mo Strange in Alabama

The campaign of Alabama Sen. Luther Strange criticized one of his primary opponents, Rep. Mo Brooks, as hypocritical. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Do voters care about floor procedure? Two candidates in a crowded special Senate primary are spending time feuding over the filibuster, so they might find out next month when they, and several others, face off for the GOP nod. 

When Rep. Mo Brooks released the first ad of his Alabama Senate campaign, he made a splash by threatening to filibuster — by reading from the King James Bible — any spending bill that doesn’t fund President Donald Trump’s border wall.

Filibuster Fight Makes Its Way Into Alabama Senate Race
Strange campaign accuses Brooks of ‘flip-flopping’

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks is rejecting charges of flip-flopping from Senate rival Luther Strange’s campaign. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Rep. Mo Brooks released the first ad of his Alabama Senate campaign, he made a splash by threatening to filibuster — by reading from the King James Bible — any spending bill that doesn’t fund President Donald Trump’s border wall. 

On Wednesday, he took to the House floor to blast the Senate’s legislative filibuster, calling it a “murder weapon” that’s “killing” Trump’s agenda. That’s not a new position for Brooks.

Brooks Defends Replica Military Badge He Received
Alabama Senate opponent says veterans complained to him

Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., is facing criticism from a Republican primary opponent and Iraq War veteran for wearing a replica military badge on his jacket lapel. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Mo Brooks responded Wednesday to criticism by a 2018 Republican challenger for wearing what appeared to be a military pin on his jacket lapel even though Brooks has not served in the military.

Brooks told Roll Call Wednesday the badge, which is a replica and not U.S.-issued, was given to him by a constituent, decorated Vietnam War veteran Col. John Reitzell, for aiding two wounded victims of the shooting at the Republican baseball practice in Alexandria in June where House Majority Whip Steve Scalise and four others were shot.

Take Five: Jimmy Gomez
California Democrat reflects on his first week in Congress

California Rep. Jimmy Gomez previously worked on the Hill for Rep. Hilda L. Solis and recalls telling himself he wouldn’t return to Washington until he was a member of Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Freshman Rep. Jimmy Gomez, 42, a California Democrat, talks about the time between his being elected and being sworn in, returning as a former Hill staffer, and his welcome to Washington compared to Montana Rep. Greg Gianforte’s.

Q: What has surprised you about Congress so far?

Opinion: History Lessons — Ted Kennedy, Watergate and the Bravest Senate Vote
And stay tuned for a fake news alert …

Massachusetts Sen. Edward M. Kennedy’s death in 2009 and the subsequent election of Republican Sen. Scott P. Brown in 2010 prevented the Democrats from refining the 2010 health care law, Shapiro writes. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

John McCain’s surgery for a blood clot serves as a reminder that the fate of health care legislation is yet again being shaped by the frailties of the giants of the Senate.

Had Ted Kennedy lived long enough to see the victory of what he called “the cause of my life,” congressional Democrats would have been able to refine the Affordable Care Act. Instead, the victory of Republican Scott Brown in the January 2010 Massachusetts special election to fill the Kennedy seat (effectively a family fiefdom since 1952) deprived Democrats of their filibuster-proof majority.

Was President at Trump Tower When Son Met Russian Lawyer?
Legal expert: Mueller will probe whether Trump knew of meeting in June 2016

Trump Tower was the site of a meeting between a Russian lawyer and President Donald Trump’s eldest son, his son-in-law and his then-campaign chairman in June 2016. (Courtesy Epicgenius/Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 4.0)

Updated at 5:43 p.m. A review of open-source data indicates then-candidate Donald Trump was inside Trump Tower last year when his eldest son and at least two other top aides huddled with a Russian lawyer they believed had Kremlin-supplied information that could hurt presidential rival Hillary Clinton.

White House and Trump campaign officials, along with the president’s private legal team, have not disputed as of publication time that he was at his Manhattan steel-and-glass haven. That means Trump was nearby — though likely on a different floor — when his son and associates believed they were about to receive information from the Kremlin intended to ding another candidate for the country’s highest office.

What’s Tim Ryan Doing in New Hampshire?
Democratic rising star also plans to visit Indiana, Kentucky, West Virginia, and Alabama

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, is heading to New Hampshire and also has plans to visit Midwestern and Southern states. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Meet the Special Election Class of 2017 (So Far)
This year’s elections have brought a new crop of freshmen to Congress

California Rep.-elect Jimmy Gomez hugs his mother, Socorro, as his wife, Mary Hodge, looks on, during his ceremonial House swearing-in Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By CHRIS HALE, BILL CLARK and TOM WILLIAMS

California Democrat Jimmy Gomez became the newest member of the House on Tuesday after being officially sworn in by Speaker Paul D. Ryan

Mapping Out 2018 in the Senate
Democrats are still on the defensive but can’t be dismissed

Alabama Sen. Luther Strange faces a competitive Republican special election primary next month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Eight months into the 2018 election cycle and with 16 months to go, the fundamentals of the Senate map haven’t changed.

One state has been added to the map: Alabama.

GOP Waiting on Rosendale in Montana Senate Race
With top contenders passing on contest, crowded primary emerging

Montana State Auditor Matt Rosendale, seen here in 2013, is expected to run for Senate. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Republican field for Montana’s Senate race keeps growing, but the GOP is hopeful that an imminent announcement from state Auditor Matt Rosendale will give them a top-tier challenger against Sen. Jon Tester, one of 2018’s most vulnerable Democrats. 

“He is 95 percent there,” a Republican close to Rosendale said last week. The first-term auditor is expected to make a decision within the month.