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Ryan: 'We Need to Actually Have Ideas'

Ryan said that Republicans won't be afraid to take up major legislation in the coming election year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s message Thursday was clear: House Republicans are ready for 2016. They will not sit around killing time while the GOP presidential candidates fight it out. They can and will offer bold legislative solutions that will show what a GOP-led Washington could accomplish. 

He previewed the House’s 2016 agenda Thursday during his first major address as speaker, highlighting policy areas where he says Republicans can and should offer legislative solutions. “If we want to save the country, then we need a mandate from the people,” Ryan said. “And if we want a mandate, then we need to offer ideas. And if we want to offer ideas, then we need to actually have ideas. And that’s where House Republicans come in.”

Ryan: 'No Idea' How Long I'll Be Speaker

Ryan addresses the House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, after two weeks on the job, said he has “no idea” how long he may lead the House, committing only to the 14 months left in the current Congress during an interview on CBS’ “60 Minutes.”  

No matter the duration of his tenure, the Wisconsin Republican told Scott Pelley of CBS News he is willing to risk losing the job in pursuit of major policy initiatives including tax and entitlement overhauls. The speaker also said in the interview that aired Sunday he and President Barack Obama could find common ground on select issues.  

Speaker Ryan’s Staff: Where Have They Been?

Ryan speaks with his chief of staff, John David Hoppe, following the Senate GOP's policy luncheon last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 6:02 p.m. | Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s initial staff is a mix of longtime confidants of the Wisconsin Republican, experienced Washington lobbyists and a contingent of former Speaker John A. Boehner’s aides.  

A CQ Roll Call analysis of the work experience of the 22 staffers confirmed as part of the new speaker’s team shows many have spent considerable time in other congressional offices. There’s a cumulative 48 years with former Speaker John A. Boehner during his 24-year tenure on Capitol Hill. The staffers have accumulated 38 years working with Ryan.  

Boehner May Do More Than Golf After Congress

A man walks by Boehner's new Longworth office Monday. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 10:51 a.m. | Former Speaker John A. Boehner may have more than golf on his post-congressional to-do list.  

The Ohio Republican has hired Robert Barnett, a high-powered attorney with Williams & Connolly, who is best known for helping former government officials ink lucrative book deals and private-sector gigs. He helped Hillary Rodham Clinton negotiate publishing agreements such as the $8 million deal for her “Living History" memoir. Dave Schnittger, a former Boehner Hill aide now with the lobbying firm Squire Patton Boggs, confirmed Barnett's role. Schnittger also noted that former Boehner aide John Criscuolo will head up the ex-speaker's political affairs.  

Parsing Ryan: Immigration Stance Open to Interpretation

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Paul D. Ryan has made one thing clear: He’s taking immigration off the table for the remainder of Barack Obama’s presidency.  

Yet members on both sides of the aisle are still finding plenty to read into the new speaker’s statements on the subject as they try to game out what Ryan's plans for immigration mean for them.  

Ryan Leaves Door Open to Policy Riders in Spending Bill

Ryan addresses the crowd after being sworn in on the House floor as the 54th speaker of the House on Oct. 29. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 3:35 p.m. | Speaker Paul D. Ryan won't rule out policy riders in the omnibus appropriations bill the House will consider in the weeks ahead.  

“This is the legislative branch, and the power of the purse rests within the legislative branch," the Wisconsin Republican said Tuesday at his first news conference as speaker, "and we fully expect that we're going to exercise that power."  

Boehner: 'God Had Another Plan' for Ryan

Ryan addresses the House. (Tom Williams, CQ Roll Call)

Paul D. Ryan said he took the job he didn't want, speaker of the House, out of an obligation to help unify a fractured Republican Conference.  

The Wisconsin lawmaker's immediate predecessor, John A. Boehner, said Sunday there was another compelling factor at play: God. "You have no choice, this isn't about what you want to do, this is about what God wants you to do, and God told me he wants you to do this," Boehner said he told Ryan a few weeks ago and recounted in an interview with CNN's Dana Bash that aired on the "State of the Union" program.  

Ryan: Immigration Overhaul Off the Table Under Obama

Boehner, foreground, and Ryan after the Oct. 29 speaker election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Newly elected Speaker Paul D. Ryan wants Republicans to spend the remainder of the 114th Congress offering major policy ideas, except on immigration.  

Ryan said on NBC's "Meet the Press" that President Barack Obama has shown he cannot be trusted on immigration policy because he tried to circumvent Congress and make changes to immigration laws by executive order. "The president's proven himself to be untrustworthy on this issue," Ryan said. "I think if we reach consensus on something like border enforcement, interior security, that's one thing. But I do not believe we should advance comprehensive immigration legislation with a president whose proven himself untrustworthy on this issue."  

10 Anti-Boehner Republicans Who Didn't Vote for Ryan

Ryan before the speaker vote. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 2:24 p.m. | Call them the "Speaker No" crowd.  

Ten Republicans who did not vote for Paul D. Ryan to be the 54th speaker of the House Thursday also didn't vote to support John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, in January. Nine Republicans voted for Rep. Daniel Webster, R-Fla., to be speaker. Webster, the tenth Republican who did not vote for Ryan or Boehner, said he and the Wisconsin Republican had agreed not to vote for themselves.