Social Security

Trump Budget’s Chilly Reception Will Be Nothing New
Congress routinely rebuffed Obama budgets too

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney, center, and GPO Director Davita Vance-Cooks, right, reviewed production of the fiscal 208 budget proposal at the Government Publishing Office’s plant on North Capitol Street last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s budget request finally gets its full release Tuesday morning, but the stories of its inevitable rejection on Capitol Hill could have been written weeks ago.

There has been ample bipartisan skepticism of the proposed cuts to domestic programs coming out of Trump’s budget office for fiscal 2018, but overall, the reaction and follow through on it will not likely be much different than it ever was under President Barack Obama.

Army Reserve Lawyer to Challenge Peters in California
Omar Qudrat prosecuted terrorist cases

Omar Qudrat has not yet filed, but he has launched a website making his case in his challenge to Rep. Scott Peters of California. (omarqudrat.com)

Army Reserve lawyer Omar Qudrat is expected to announce his candidacy against California Rep. Scott Peters.

On his website, Qudrat, who has yet to officially announced, highlights his work as a civilian attorney in Afghanistan and as a reserve officer in the Army’s Judge Advocate’s General Corps. He advocates clearing the regulatory way for small businesses to add jobs, to fix the country’s “broken education system” and 

Trump Wants $800 Billion, 10-Year Cut in Entitlement Programs
Programs include Medicaid and Social Security Disability Insurance

Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney speaks to the media about President Donald Trump's budget during a May 2 briefing at the White House. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

White House officials are crafting a fiscal 2018 budget proposal for President Donald Trump that aims to wipe out the deficit through a combination of robust economic growth, steep cuts in certain means-tested entitlement programs and other savings.

Trump would aim to balance the federal budget within 10 years. His plan relies on Congress passing a comprehensive tax overhaul and other policies, such as deregulation. The administration believes these approaches will jump-start the economy, causing economic growth to ramp up to 3 percent in the coming decade, people with knowledge of the plan said.

Progressives’ ‘People's Budget’ Becomes ‘Roadmap for the Resistance’
Yearly budget calls for big jobs and infrastructure spending, tax hikes for the rich

From left, Rep. Brenda Lawrence, D-Mich., Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Ariz., Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., and Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., unveil the Progressive Caucus' "budget deal principles" outside the Capitol in 2015. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With the subtitle “A Roadmap for the Resistance,” the Congressional Progressive Caucus’ “People's Budget,” isn't shy about its purpose in the Trump Era.

As Rep. Barbara Lee summarized it: “In stark contrast to President Trump’s cruel poverty budget, our progressive proposal is a plan for resistance and a roadmap to a safer, healthier and more prosperous America for all.”

Five Questions Key to Passage of the GOP’s Tax Overhaul
White House tax plan vies with House and Senate proposals

President Donald Trump’s tax plan released Wednesday offered few details on how it would not increase the deficit. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump put the pressure on congressional Republicans last week to fall in line or advance an alternative on a tax overhaul by releasing a list of his tax principles.

As lawmakers scramble to respond, they will need to find answers to five big questions dealing with issues such as revenue and deductions that could hold the key to completion of major tax legislation that’s long been the goal of Republicans.

Opinion: The S.S. Trump Is Sinking — Find a Lifeboat
An open letter to House Republicans

If they're smart, House Republicans will see that being tied to President Donald Trump is a recipe for defeat next year, Allen writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Dear Republican member of the House:

Run away from Donald Trump. Run hard. Run fast. And don’t look over your shoulder.

Conservatives Ask to Start Over on GOP Health Plan
Leadership-crafted legislation remains short of majority

From left, Rep. Dan Newhouse, R-Wash., looks on as Chairman Pete Sessions, R-Texas, speaks with staff during the House Rules Committee meeting to formulate a rule on the American Health Care Act of 2017 on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By Rema Rahman and Lindsey McPherson, CQ Roll Call

Conservatives are flexing their muscles in Congress as they get closer to securing the “no” votes that would sink the GOP leadership-crafted bill to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.

John Dingell Tweets a First-Person History of Health Care Reform
Disagrees with Trump’s ‘nobody knew health care reform was so complicated’ line

Former Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich., was one of the leading voices on health care reform. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Dingell started his tweetstorm by paraphrasing Trump, who was derided when he told a gathering of governors earlier this month that “nobody knew health care could be so complicated” before telling the story of how his father, former Rep. John Dingell Sr., proposed the first attempt to increase health care coverage for Americans in the 1940s.

Senate Democrats Preview Their Case Against Gorsuch
Supreme Court nominee cast as foe of workers

Gorsuch is Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Democrats are preparing for next week’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing, and previewed their case Wednesday that Judge Neil Gorsuch’s rulings have favored corporations over individuals. 

“Judge Gorsuch may act like a neutral, calm judge,” said Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer. “But his record and his career clearly show he harbors a right wing, pro-corporate, special interest agenda.”

Opinion: Paul Ryan and the Danger of Keeping Unworkable Promises
GOP could pay a political price in 2018 with repeal and replace push

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s rationale for a health care overhaul conflicts with where most Americans stand on the issue, Shapiro writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Paul Ryan quote from “Face the Nation” on Sunday so appealed to the speaker’s press office that it became the headline of a Monday morning press release. Referring to Obamacare, Ryan said, “We made a promise to the people who elected us, we would repeal and replace this law. … And now we are keeping our word.”

Promises made, promises kept. It sounds so inspiring. But for all the political pride in adhering to campaign promises, what usually matters far more to the voters are their personal priorities rather than those of politicians.