social media

Google under pressure from Congress, activists, shareholders
CQ on Congress, Episode 165

Google is under pressure to change its corporate culture. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images file photo)

In the face of gridlock in Congress, investors, pension funds, and some states are pushing public companies to do more to diversify their boards, combat climate change, stamp out sexual harassment and give workers a voice.

CQ Roll Call's Laura Weiss talks about what happened at Google's annual shareholder meeting where board members were confronted with protests and calls for change. 

Watch: King calls principles ‘timeless’

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, attends a rally with Angel Families on the East Front of the Capitol, to highlight crimes committed by illegal immigrants in the U.S., on September 7, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Father of slain journalist seeks regulation of internet content
Activist says Google not doing enough to police violent footage available on YouTube

Andy Parker, right, seen with Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., at a gun control rally in 2015, says YouTube has not done enough to remove videos related to his daughter's murder from its platform. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Following Saturday’s mass shooting at a mall in El Paso by a suspect who appears to have been steeped in a white supremacist internet subculture, activist Andy Parker on Tuesday accused Google executives of lying about their efforts to remove objectionable content, including footage of shootings, from its YouTube platform.

Parker also called for a new law revising the Communications Decency Act of 1996, which regulates online platforms, so that it would prohibit “targeted harassment, incitement, and murder videos” and open up technology companies to civil and criminal liability.

Rep. Ilhan Omar and ‘squad’ school House Democrats in social competition
The Minnesota Democrat is the first freshman to win ‘Overall MVP’ in the three-week internal contest

Rep. Ilhan Omar won House Democrats’ 2019 Member Online All-Star Competition. The results couldn’t have come as a surprise. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Ilhan Omar stole the social spotlight in House Democrats’ 10th annual Member Online All-Star Competition. The Minnesota Democrat is the first freshman to win the overall popularity contest, cleaning up with nearly 150,000 new followers.

Following oh so closely behind? The rest of Omar’s “squad,” of course: freshman Reps. Ayanna Pressley, Rashida Tlaib and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who rounded out the top five, along with Texas Rep. Joaquin Castro.

Summer Book Review: Angus King's Instagram Photos Are Now in Print
 

Maine Sen. Angus King’s Instagram isn’t run by his staff.  Since New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker “badgered” him into joining the social media app back in 2014, King has posted nearly 600 photos of New England landscapes, senatorial behind-the-scenes access and snowy Maine winters, amassing almost 15,000 followers. Just in time for all of D.C. to hit the beach this summer, King has released a new photo book of the greatest hits of his Insta-photography.

Podcast: How Congress Could Force Facebook to Strengthen Data Privacy
CQ on Congress, Episode 97

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faces a grilling in Congress next week.  Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

 

The Influence Game Shifts to ‘Outside-In’
Social media becomes the central tool to driving change

From left, Melania Trump, President-elect Donald Trump, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell leave McConnell's office in the U.S. Capitol following their meeting on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Clayton Christensen is often credited — and criticized — for inserting the word “disrupted” into our standard business lexicon. In “The Innovator’s Dilemma,” he describes how businesses can lose out to unconventional competitors who are able to change long-standing assumptions about what is valued and how to win.

Our recent election might be viewed as a disruption of accepted models for political campaigns.

DWS Twitter Mixup Creates Headache for California Man
Dave W Smith is getting mean tweets meant for Debbie Wasserman Schultz

Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz isn't having a very good week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Dave W. Smith is taking some of Debbie Wasserman Schultz's tough day off her hands. But not by choice.  

Smith, whose Twitter profile  says he is from Silicon Valley, is receiving mean tweets intended for the outgoing chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee  after the content of some internal committee emails were released by Wikileaks.  

Social Media, Apps, Electronic Whips in Democratic Toolbox
House members embrace social technology

Clark and Wally the bunny on Instagram.

Rep. Katherine Clark found the secret to boosting her online following: posting a picture of a cute animal.  

The picture of the Massachusetts Democrat with the internet-famous Wally the bunny  had a purpose. It was to promote a bill she sponsored to help protect pets of victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.