Senate Republicans

Health Care Backlash With a Side of Charlottesville Outrage at GOP Town Halls
Constituents ask senators to push Trump to fire Bannon, other aides

Sen. Cory Gardner said he wouldn't ask President Donald Trump to fire Steve Bannon. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Coloradans pressed Sen. Cory Gardner on health care during the Republican’s first solo, in-person town hall in more than a year.

Gardner wasn’t the only Republican senator who faced angry constituents this week, as Sen. Johnny Isakson held a contentious town hall in Georgia on Monday. The two Republicans heard a similar tune from their respective crowds, as people voiced concerns over healthcare.

House Republicans Not Ready to Abandon Obamacare Repeal
Hope springs eternal in chamber that Senate GOP can still get something done

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy want the Senate to keep alive the effort to repeal the 2010 health care law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By LINDSEY MCPHERSON and REMA RAHMAN

House Republicans on Friday said they’re not planning to abandon their effort to repeal the 2010 health care law, but their current plan for how to achieve that goal is to simply hope the Senate gets its act together.

GOP Challenger to Warren to Launch Full-Time Campaign
State Rep. Geoff Diehl promises to ‘Put Massachusetts First’

Massachusetts state Rep. Geoff Diehl said he'll start campaigning full-time against Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren on Aug. 1. (Geoff Diehl for Senate via Facebook)

A conservative Massachusetts state representative says he’ll officially launch his challenge to Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren full-time in August.

Rep. Geoff Diehl, who co-chaired President Donald Trump’s campaign in the state, told the Boston Herald Wednesday that he will begin campaigning full-time on Aug. 1.

Capitol Ink | Republican Caduceus

Senate Obamacare Repeal Bill Largely an Entitlement Overhaul
Proposal would maintain key aspects of the 2010 health care law

From left, South Dakota Sen. John Thune, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, and Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso conduct a news conference after the Senate policy luncheons in the Capitol last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A draft of the Senate counterpart legislation to overhaul the U.S. health insurance system unveiled Thursday would make drastic changes to the Medicaid program, but largely retain the existing federal tax credit structure from the 2010 health care law that helps individuals afford insurance, among other provisions. 

The proposal is part of the Republicans’ seven-year effort to gut former President Barack Obama’s signature domestic achievement. Senate GOP leadership, which has crafted the bill largely behind closed doors with virtually no public input, has faced difficulty in bridging the gap between moderate and conservative demands.

Analysis: Why the Border Adjustment Tax Is Dead and an Overhaul Could Be Too
Proponents have failed to address critics’ concerns; lack of alternatives make overhaul difficult

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, right, and Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, left, have pushed the border adjustment tax as a way to raise roughly $1 trillion in revenue to partially offset an ambitious corporate tax rate cut. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders’ controversial border adjustment tax is dead, and as a result, their plans to dramatically overhaul the tax code could soon be too. 

The border adjustment tax, or BAT, is a proposal to tax imports instead of exports, reversing the way the United States currently taxes goods crossing its borders. House GOP leaders, namely Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, have pushed for the tax as a way to discourage U.S. companies from moving operations overseas and to raise roughly $1 trillion in revenue to partially offset an ambitious corporate tax rate cut.

Tax Overhaul Not Immune to GOP Infighting
Border adjustment tax among issues that could cause intraparty stress

House Republicans may experience significant intraparty disagreements over their upcoming tax overhaul effort. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans have said a tax code rewrite will be easier than the health care overhaul that continues to elude them. Whether or not that proves true, a few intraparty battles likely lay ahead on taxes.

The GOP is united around the goal of a tax code overhaul. Republican lawmakers used Tax Day on Tuesday to highlight their shared vision for cutting tax rates, simplifying the code and spurring economic growth.

Funding Deadline Tests GOP Strategy
Republicans hoped for more under Trump, but still need Democrats’ help

From left, Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan meet for a working lunch at the White House on March 1. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

When Republicans kicked the fiscal 2017 spending deadline into April last December, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan said they’d rather negotiate with incoming GOP President Donald Trump than the outgoing Democratic one.

But now, congressional Republicans are talking about largely ignoring requests from the White House as they negotiate with Democrats over a spending bill to take the government off autopilot for the remaining five months of the fiscal year.

Democrats Back #LetLizSpeak Campaign
Warren's colleagues show they can use Twitter, too

Democrats like Schumer have joined in on Twitter’s #LetLizSpeak campaign to protest Republicans’ shutting down Warren’s speech about Sessions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats are taking up the #LetLizSpeak Twitter campaign backing Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren for her floor speech against attorney general nominee Sen. Jeff Sessions that Republicans cut off Tuesday night. 

Warren was reading a letter the late Coretta Scott King wrote to the Senate Judiciary Committee in 1986 opposing Sessions’ confirmation to be a federal district court judge as well as quoting statements from the late Sen. Edward Kennedy from that time. King’s letter said, among other thing, “Sessions has used the awesome powers of his office in a shabby attempt to intimidate and frighten elderly black voters.”

Ep. 38: Trump and GOP: The New Odd Couple
The Big Story

 

Ahead of the GOP retreat, CQ Roll Call's leadership editor Jason Dick and White House correspondent John Bennett provide insight into the awkward relationship developing between President Donald Trump and the Republicans who control Congress.