Senate Conservatives Fund

Senate Conservatives Fund Makes First House Endorsements of 2016

SCF has backed one of Ellmers' primary challengers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Senate Conservatives Fund endorsed its first three House candidates of the cycle on Tuesday.  

The SCF has traditionally backed conservative Senate candidates, but in 2013 the organization started playing in House races with its "House Conservatives Project."  

Conservative Groups Not Sold on John McCain Challenger

McCain speaks to reporters in the Ohio Clock Corridor. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Conservative outside groups have made it crystal clear they want John McCain out of the Senate, but a fog remains over whether any will back the Arizona Republican’s most prominent opponent so far.  

While state Sen. Kelli Ward, a doctor who hails from a predominantly rural district in Lake Havasu City, is the most well-known Republican to enter the race, she has yet to earn the backing of some of the major conservative organizations able to offer significant financial support. When asked if the Senate Conservatives Fund had a candidate in mind to replace McCain, a spokesperson said, "We are looking at this race as it develops, like we are with many other races.” A FreedomWorks spokesman said earlier this year the group would only back a "viable candidate." And Club for Growth spokesman Doug Sachtleben hedged on July 20 when asked if the group would support Ward’s candidacy.  

McConnell, Cornyn Walk Plank on Debt Limit to Ire of Conservatives

Senate Republican leaders Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and John Cornyn of Texas on Wednesday voted to advance legislation that would increase the nation's borrowing capacity — but not before they spent 40 minutes of the open vote trying to get others to do it for them, likely out of fear of the conservative blowback that came almost immediately.  

Earlier this week, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, demanded the 60-vote procedural move, which put McConnell and Cornyn in the uncomfortable position of having to find five Republicans to join Democrats in supporting the debt ceiling measure. By doing so, Cruz gave perfect fodder to tea party groups and candidates, like the Senate Conservatives Fund and McConnell opponent Matt Bevin, against in-cycle Republicans who would need to vote for the bill as opposed to just letting Democrats do it themselves with a simple majority.