Senate

Counter Parties in D.C. Surrounding the Inauguration
What to do this week if you’re not fired up about Trump’s election

Capitol staffers cheered from balconies as hundreds of Washington, D.C.,-area high school students march to protest the election of Donald Trump in November. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As workers toil to return the National Mall and its surroundings to its pre-inaugural state, a crowd estimated in the hundreds of thousands is expected to gather on Saturday for the Women’s March on Washington.

And that’s not the only event around Washington this week for venting negative feelings toward the Trump presidency.

Patience and Perspective: Inauguration Memories and Advice
This inauguration will be the first for nearly one quarter of Congress.

Vermont Sen Patrick J. Leahy, right, takes photos of the media camped out in the Rotunda for President Barack Obama’s inauguration ceremony in 2013. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The inauguration festivities that will take over the Capitol on Friday will be a new experience for nearly a quarter of Congress.

Roughly a dozen senators and nearly 120 House members will be attending their first presidential inauguration as a member of Congress when President-elect Donald Trump is sworn in. But luckily, they can defer to more senior members for advice on how to navigate the chaotic day.

Word on the Hill: The Day Before
Details about getting around D.C.

Workers put the finishing touches on the platform at the Capitol on Tuesday for Donald Trump's inauguration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Tomorrow is Donald Trump’s big day and the bulk of state society parties take place tonight.

Check out our list of this evening’s balls and galas and tips for making the most of the next couple of days.

Global Events Drive Inauguration Security
Capitol’s top law enforcement officials consider new threats

Larkin, left, and Irving, right, must weigh security versus access when it comes to the inauguration. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Threats, both domestic and foreign, are driving some of the logistics of the 58th presidential inauguration as the Capitol’s top law enforcement officers prepare to secure the public and members of all three branches of government at the same time in the same place.

Recent events in France and Germany, where terrorists drove trucks into crowds of people, pose a new type of threat to consider when handling planning for the day, Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Frank Larkin said.

History Provides Trump a Guide for His Inaugural Address
Changes in party rule show how presidents both praise and criticize

An aide to President-elect Donald Trump, seen here at a news conference on Jan. 11 at Trump Tower in New York City, says his inaugural address will be “unique to him.” (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Newly sworn-in American presidents taking over for a predecessor of another political party have employed a number of rhetorical approaches from which Donald Trump could choose to borrow on Friday. Trump has met with historians and watched past inaugural addresses, but a top aide said his first speech as president will be “unique to him.”

Given the unprecedented tone of both his campaigning style and brash tenor during the transition period, anything is possible when the new president steps to the podium bearing the seal of the president around noon Friday. It is a safe bet some or most of Trump’s address will sound much different than those delivered in the past. 

Rick Perry Can Help Launch the Next Great Era in American Energy
Trump‘s Energy secretary pick cuts through bureaucracy

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, President-elect Trump's nominee for Energy secretary, meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell during a photo op in the Capitol on Jan. 4. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Texas and energy are synonymous with one another. Most Americans probably think of the Lone Star State as an oil and gas economy with a lot of heft, and for good reason. The industry supports tens of thousands of jobs in the state and helps power one-third of the country.

But what many don’t know is that my state’s energy dominance isn’t confined to oil and gas alone — in recent years, Texas has become a leader in renewables, thanks in large part to former Gov. Rick Perry.  

Pence Will be First to Use Reagan’s Bible for Swearing-in
It's traveling with a former Reagan staffer from Reagan Library in California

Traveling to Washington for Mike Pence’s swearing-in will be Ronald Reagan’s Bible’s first trip outside the Reagan Library. (Courtesy Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute)

Vice President-elect Mike Pence says it’s “humbling” to be sworn into office using President Ronald Reagan’s family Bible. Its caretaker says it took some courage to ask to use it.

“No one’s ever had the courage, I guess, until this point to make an ask for it,” John Heubusch, executive director of the Reagan Library, said Wednesday.

Confirmation Specualtion Swirls in the Senate
Leaders are negotiating whether Cabinet picks can be swiftly confirmed Friday

Defense Secretary nominee James Mattis could be one of the nominees confirmed on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

<strong>By BRIDGET BOWMAN AND NIELS LESNIEWSKI</strong><br> <strong>CQ Roll Call</strong>

Senators’ focus on President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees continued Wednesday afternoon, with some attention turning toward which nominees might be confirmed on Friday.

Barack Obama Has Left the Building, Or At Least the Brady Room
Obama's hope fades a bit: 'I think we’re going to be OK'

At his final news conference as president, Obama wished the press, and the country, luck. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

In his final press conference as president, Barack Obama warned that economic and other forces could further divide Americans, and sent messages anew to Donald Trump, particularly that he could re-enter the political arena if “our core values may be at stake.”

Less than 48 hours before he will cede all powers of the presidency to Trump, the 55-year-old Obama, with more salt than pepper atop his head, showed flashes of the optimistic candidate who toppled both Hillary Clinton and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., during the 2008 presidential campaign. But by the end of the session, his concerns about the next four years appear to show through.

Mulvaney: I Paid $15,583 in Back Taxes for Household Employee

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., participates in the Citizens Against Government Waste press conference to release the 2016 Congressional Pig Book report on pork spending on Wednesday, April 13, 2016, at the Phoenix Park Hotel in Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, the staunch conservative nominated to become President-elect Donald Trump’s budget chief, failed to pay more than $15,000 in federal payroll taxes for a past household employee, he told the Senate Budget Committee in a questionnaire.

“I have come to learn, during the confirmation review process, that I failed to pay FICA and federal and state unemployment taxes on a household employee for the years 2000-2004,” Mulvaney, R-S.C., wrote in a section of the document, obtained by Roll Call on Wednesday. “Upon discovery of that shortfall, I paid the federal taxes.”