Scott Garrett

Steve King Belittles NRCC for Supporting Gay Candidate
Embattled Republican makes joke about Supreme Court justices Kagan and Sotomayor ‘eloping to Cuba’

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, has been under fire for taking positions supporting white nationalists. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Under renewed scrutiny for his incendiary comments about immigration and multiculturalism, embattled Iowa Rep. Steve King leaned on homophobia in his closing statement to voters Monday, according to video captured by Democratic trackers and other reports.

King ratcheted up his feud with the House campaign arm of the Republican Party, belittling the National Republican Congressional Committee for supporting a gay candidate in California.

Trump’s Controversial Pick for Banking Watchdog Clears First Hurdle
All eyes may be on Kavanaugh, but Kathy Kraninger nomination is kicking up dust too

Kathy Kraninger is one step closer to a floor vote on her nomination to lead the CFPB. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

The Senate Banking Committee advanced Thursday the controversial nomination of Kathy Kraninger to be director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The vote split on party lines, 13-12. 

The panel’s chairman, Michael D. Crapo of Idaho, said Kraninger was “well prepared” to lead the bureau, and that it’s no surprise her nomination is contentious because the CFPB was the most disputed aspect of the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act financial overhaul. 

Blue Dog Democrats Vote With GOP More in 2018
Illinois Rep. Brad Schneider had biggest drop in party unity score

Illinois Democratic Rep. Brad Schneider saw his party unity score drop in 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Blue Dog Democrats tend to move to the right in election years, which is understandable given that they typically represent swing districts.

And lately no district has swung more than Illinois’ 10th, in the affluent suburbs north of Chicago. Democratic Rep. Brad Schneider is currently serving his second, nonconsecutive term, having defeated Republican Robert J. Dold in 2016.

A Senate Christmas Present: Several Trump Nominees Confirmed
Senators finish delayed routine business, hard choices put off

UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 7: The U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree stands on the West Lawn of the Capitol on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

At the very end of an acrimonious first year working with President Donald Trump in the Oval Office, the Senate reverted to form, looking very much like the Senate.

Republican Senate Starting to Block Trump Nominees
Former Rep. Scott Garrett latest to get crosswise with GOP Senate

The Senate Banking Committee has rejected former Rep. Scott Garrett, R-N.J., as President Donald Trump's nominee to be president of the Export-Import Bank. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In another example of the increased scrutiny President Donald Trump’s nominees are facing, the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday rejected the nomination of former Rep. Scott Garrett, R-N.J., to lead the Export-Import Bank, with Republicans Tim Scott of South Carolina and Mike Rounds of South Dakota joining Democrats to vote him down.

Garrett was a vocal opponent of the bank when he was in Congress, and his nomination was in trouble from the start. But it follows a pattern of other nominees running into headwinds in the Republican-controlled Senate.

Garrett Does a 180 on Ex-Im Bank
Trump nominee will reverse course on bank, according to prepared remarks

Former New Jersey Rep. Scott Garrett faces a confirmation hearing Wednesday on his nomination to lead the Export-Import Bank. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the Export-Import Bank is preparing to make a full reversal of his past opposition to the agency’s continued operation.

Former Rep. Scott Garrett plans to tell senators that he not only opposes winding down the Ex-Im Bank, but that he wants it fully operational going forward under his potential stewardship.

Steny Hoyer Really Wants to Talk About Scott Garrett
Minority whip asks Banking Committee for chance to testify against former colleague

House Minority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., really doesn’t want former Rep. Scott Garrett, R-N.J., to run the Export-Import Bank. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

There is apparently no love lost between House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., and his former House colleague, Republican Scott Garrett of New Jersey.

On Wednesday, Hoyer told the Senate Banking Committee he wants to testify against Garrett’s nomination to head the Export-Import Bank, saying Garrett is “precisely the wrong pick to lead the” bank, writing in a letter to the panel that Garrett “led efforts to block its reauthorization and played a key role in causing a lapse in its charter.”

Take Five: Scott Taylor
Virginia Republican quoted Cypress Hill during a GOP conference meeting with Ryan

Virginia Rep. Scott Taylor recalls almost being put on the no-fly list while serving in Yemen. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Freshman Rep. Scott Taylor, 37, a Virginia Republican, talks about being a Navy SEAL, getting a strange text in Yemen, and spending time with his son.

Q: What has surprised you about Congress so far?

New Jersey Districts Will Test Democrats’ Suburban Strategy
National Democrats are making fresh targets out of Lance and Frelinghuysen

Protesters gather outside before New Jersey Rep. Leonard Lance’s town hall meeting at the Raritan Valley Community College in Branchburg on Feb. 22. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

LIVINGSTON, N.J. — Mitchell Bross, a lifelong Republican, has some concerns about how GOP Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen voted this year.

But he hasn’t been able to share his concerns with the 12-term New Jersey congressman at a town hall meeting because Frelinghuysen refuses to have one.

House Freshmen to Watch
115th Congress provides a platform for ambitious new members

Kihuen, left, comes to Congress with a record of success in Nevada, and the blessing of former Sen. Harry Reid. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Not all freshmen are created equal.

While there is always a learning curve for new members of the House, some of the newly elected come to the institution with an enhanced profile. This could be because they are former statewide officeholders, or perhaps scored a big one for the team by knocking off a longtime incumbent. Maybe they are natural leaders or their ambitions are such that they are already looking at other federal offices.