Science

Attempts to Find Bipartisan Mood Challenged at Start
Despite hope among both parties, partisanship rears ugly head

President Donald J. Trump addresses the crowd after being sworn in as the 45th President of the United States on the West Front of the Capitol, January 20, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s inauguration ushered in hopes from both sides of the aisle for some bipartisan comity. But shortly after Trump departed the Capitol Friday, those feelings ran headfirst into the partisan scars of the previous Congress.

Some Democrats see the GOP reaping the rewards of what they call a strategy of obstruction in the last Congress, and it might be difficult for them to heed calls for bipartisanship, even if it’s something they might believe needs to happen. 

Barack Obama Has Left the Building, Or At Least the Brady Room
Obama's hope fades a bit: 'I think we’re going to be OK'

At his final news conference as president, Obama wished the press, and the country, luck. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

In his final press conference as president, Barack Obama warned that economic and other forces could further divide Americans, and sent messages anew to Donald Trump, particularly that he could re-enter the political arena if “our core values may be at stake.”

Less than 48 hours before he will cede all powers of the presidency to Trump, the 55-year-old Obama, with more salt than pepper atop his head, showed flashes of the optimistic candidate who toppled both Hillary Clinton and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., during the 2008 presidential campaign. But by the end of the session, his concerns about the next four years appear to show through.

Word on the Hill: Inauguration Planning
Wi-Fi and portable potties

Spectators on the National Mall watch an address by President Barack Obama during his second inauguration in 2013. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

What’s your plan for the inauguration? There are plenty of galas and balls to try and get into mainly on Thursday and Friday.

Thanks to Comcast, you can look up something to do at the last minute or contact your friends easily. Through Jan. 26, the internet provider has more than 6,800 Xfinity Wi-Fi hotspots outdoors around Washington for the public to connect for free.

Take Five: Roger Wicker
Mississippi Republican disappointed in members boycotting inauguration

Mississippi Sen. Roger Wicker, left, seen here with Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson, says he’s living his American dream. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Mississippi Republican Sen. Roger Wicker, 65, talks inauguration advice for the new president, members’ boycott of Friday’s event, and what’s on his reading list.

Q: What’s your take on the political climate and boycotting surrounding the inauguration?

Word on the Hill: Inauguration Week
Other events going on this week

More confirmation hearings are scheduled for this week. Last week, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, nominee to be the ambassador to the United Nations got a hug from Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., on the Senate subway. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s the week of Donald Trump’s inauguration, which means parties, crowds and traffic in the nation’s capital.

Check out our list of balls and galas going on this week. If you have more to add, email AlexGangitano@cqrollcall.com.

House Homeland Panels Agree to Coordinate Oversight

House Homeland Security Chairman Michael McCaul, R-Texas, speaks during the House Republican leaders' media availability immediately after the Republican Conference meeting on Tuesday, June 14, 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

All of the House committees with jurisdiction over the Department of Homeland Security have for the first time agreed they will begin coordinating their oversight functions with the aim of producing an annual policy bill that would govern the department’s nearly two dozen agencies.

Chairmen of eight House committees signed a memorandum of understanding pledging to coordinate with the House Homeland Security Committee “to produce a comprehensive authorization bill for the department,” according to a copy of the agreement obtained by CQ. The agreement will be entered into the Congressional Record Thursday.

Young: GPO to Use ‘Hoosiers’ Because No One Says ‘Indianan’
‘Setting the record straight, we hope, for time immemorial’

Sen. Todd Young, R-Ind., reveals his favorite 'Hoosier' theory. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

People from Indiana will soon be referred to as Hoosiers in government documents, in part thanks to the state’s new junior senator, Todd Young

The Government Publishing Office is releasing information declaring the name change on Thursday, Young said.

Chao Drives Toward Quick Confirmation
Transportation designee wins bipartisan praise at Commerce Committee

Transportation Secretary-designee Elaine Chao testifies as her husband, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, looks on during her Senate Commerce Committee confirmation hearing on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

On Wednesday morning, Sen. Mitch McConnell’s most important title in the Senate wasn’t majority leader. It was husband.

“I regret that I have but one wife to give for my country’s infrastructure,” the Kentucky Republican quipped at the confirmation hearing for his spouse, Transportation Secretary nominee Elaine L. Chao. The line was borrowed from former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, whose wife, Elizabeth, once held the same Cabinet post.

Pompeo, DeVos, Ross Confirmation Hearings Delayed
3 Trump nominees still due to testify on Thursday

CIA Director-designee Rep. Mike Pompeo of Kansas is expected to have a smooth path to confirmation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 5:45 p.m. The Senate Intelligence Committee has pushed back the confirmation hearing for CIA Director-designee Mike Pompeo from Wednesday to Thursday — one of a series of delays or postponements affecting the crowded confirmation schedule.

The Intelligence panel did not provide a reason for the change, but the hearing for President-elect Donald Trump’s pick to the lead the CIA was one of five originally scheduled for Wednesday. It will now join two other confirmation hearings planned for Thursday, including another key national security post — Defense secretary.

Fish on a Treadmill and Other Waste, According to Jeff Flake
Arizona Republican plans another push for a permanent earmark ban

The cover of Sen. Jeff Flake’s latest Wastebook. (Courtesy Sen. Flake’s office)

Sen. Jeff Flake highlights 50 examples of questionable, even frivolous federal spending in the latest edition of his government wastebook.

Flake calls the latest volume “Wastebook: PORKémon Go.” All told, the Arizona Republican’s office says it details more than $5 billion in inappropriate spending by federal departments and agencies.