Ron Wyden

White House Middle East Victory Lap Draws Skepticism
Aides pushing a win, but headaches await return from region

President Donald Trump delivers a statement with Israeli President Reuven Rivlinon on Monday in Jerusalem. The White House says its first Middle East visit was a big success, but some Democrats are skeptical. (Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images)

The White House is describing President Donald Trump’s first dose of Middle East diplomacy as a “historic” success, but some lawmakers are skeptical that the optimistic rhetoric will become policy, and at least one is looking to block a major announcement from the trip. 

Trump spent all or parts of four days huddling with Muslim and Israeli leaders before heading to Europe on Tuesday afternoon. So confident was the White House that the first leg of Trump’s overseas diplomatic debut had gone well that they did not wait to land in Italy to declare victory.

FCC Flooded With Reaction to Repealing Net Neutrality
Public comments echo 2015 rule making

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai is opposed to the Obama-era open internet rules and his commission is in a position to roll them back. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

More than 1.2 million comments on net neutrality have flooded into the Federal Communications Commission in the two weeks since the agency proposed a rollback of the Obama-era open internet regulations, which requires that all internet traffic be treated the same.

The outpouring of public sentiment, both pro and con, promises to match or exceed the roughly 4 million comments filed over several months prior to the FCC’s 2015 net neutrality rulemaking, which required internet providers to treat customers equally in terms of price and connection speeds.

Word on the Hill: Weekend for Moms
Today is the annual memorial service honoring the four Capitol Police officers

Political moms will be celebrated on Sunday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sunday is Mother’s Day and we talked to some senators about lessons they learned from their mothers.

Sens. Tim Scott, Debbie Stabenow, Lisa Murkowski and Ron Wyden paid tribute to their moms and shared with us some stories.

Senators Have Moms Too: Lessons on Mother’s Day

New Staffer Association Wants to Unite Digital Democrats
Co-founders say now is the time for the party to up its digital game

Jessica Presley, left, and Rebecca Steele, both run digital operations in their offices. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A new congressional staff group is looking for members who feel they have few accessible resources when it comes to digital communications.

House staffer Jessica Presley and Senate staffer Rebecca Steele co-founded the Democratic Digital Communications Staff Association on March 20 and it has nine founding members.

Crucial Health Bills Have a Fraught Path Amid Partisan Blowups
Bickering could delay progress on changes to 2010 health care law

Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee, said the panel will next focus on Medicare policies related to patients with chronic illnesses. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A highly anticipated markup of a must-pass Food and Drug Administration bill was postponed Wednesday because of partisan sparring over the firing of FBI Director James B. Comey. The delay comes after the Senate Finance Committee last week indefinitely postponed a hearing on the Children’s Health Insurance Program because of the toxic politics of the Republican health care bill. The cancellations raise questions about whether a deluge of drama consuming the Capitol could push lower-profile but important health care legislation off the rails.

Both bills — which congressional leaders hoped to pass without major controversies — need to be addressed well before their Sept. 30 deadlines so the FDA employees and children’s health providers who rely on funding affected by the bills can keep working.

Word on the Hill: Capitol Artwork Wrapped
Former congresswoman joins NYU, and conservative senators get ranked

Paintings have been wrapped on the Senate side of the Capitol during testing of a new smoke control system. (Niels Lesniewski/CQ Roll Call)

You may have noticed that some paintings and busts around the Capitol are covered in a plastic wrapping.

The artwork located in the corridors and grand stairwells of the Capitol are all covered for their protection during the testing of the new smoke control system

Photos of the Recess: A Tax Protest, Special Election and 4/20 Event
The weeks of April 10 and April 17 as seen by Roll Call's photographers

A Hill staffer reads a book during the lunch hour on the East Lawn of the Capitol on April 18. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Warm weather punctuated the spring recess in Washington. As congressmen took two weeks back home in their states and districts, some Hill staffers were able to enjoy the sun on lunch breaks and head early to happy hours.

But it wasn't all that quiet on the congressional front. A Tax March on Saturday, April 15 brought protesters to Capitol Hill to demand President Donald Trump release his tax returns. CQ Roll Call hit the road to Atlanta for the special election to fill Tom Price's seat. And back in Washington, the recess neared its end as a 4/20 event resulted in seven arrests for marijuana possession and possession with intent to distribute near the Dirksen Senate Office Building.

Protesters in D.C. Demand Trump Release His Tax Returns
April 15 event on the National Mall coincides with others across U.S.

People gather for the Tax March on the West Lawn of the Capitol to call on President Donald Trump to release his tax returns on Saturday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As Tax Day approaches on Tuesday, April 18, protesters organized a Saturday demonstration in front of the Capitol to demand that President Donald Trump release his tax returns.

He’s the first president in nearly 40 years to not disclose such information. Similar protests were held across the country.

Lawmakers Introduce Bills to Ease Tax Burdens, Criminal Penalties on Pot
Proposal comes amid continued confusion about Trump administration stance

Two of Congress’ biggest proponents of marijuana legalization redoubled their efforts Thursday with a package of bills to “pave the way” for federal regulation of the burgeoning pot industry.