Ron DeSantis

Top 10 Trump Nicknames and Why They Stick to His Foes
Derisive monikers often ‘are code words for something else,’ Dem strategist says

President Donald Trump at a business session with governors at the White House earlier this year. He has a way of weakening opponents with nicknames his critics call offensive. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS — President Donald Trump had the friendly crowd at a simmer during a campaign rally Tuesday evening in Tampa, Florida. Then the showman in chief dropped two words that sent them into a raucous boil: “Crooked Hillary.”

Trump had long pivoted away from the man he was ostensibly there to boost in his no-longer-long-shot bid for the Republican nomination for governor, Florida Rep. Ron DeSantis. Trump was touting Trump. Just before employing the derisive moniker that helped him vanquish his 2016 general election foe, Trump was boasting about moving the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem.

11 Memorable Moments as Trump Touts DeSantis, Scott in Florida
President again fixates on crowd size, 2016 election win

President Donald Trump waves as he leaves a rally in Tampa, Fla., on Tuesday. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS — President Donald Trump showed again Tuesday evening why he is as much the disruptor in chief as he is the commander in chief, jetting to Florida to weigh in on the Sunshine State’s Republican gubernatorial primary.

Trump called the candidate he has endorsed, Rep. Ron DeSantis, onstage early at a rally in Tampa, even branding him with a compliment he reserves for a select few — a “tough cookie.” Presidents typically have avoided getting involved in primaries for state and and congressional races. But not Trump, who is eager to put candidates who share his nationalist and conservative bona fides into elected office at all levels.

DeSantis Teaches His Kids the ABCs of Trump in New Ad
Florida Republican tries to show he is the most pro-Trump gubernatorial candidate

Florida Rep. Ron DeSantis tries to show he is the most pro-Trump candidate in the Republican primary for Florida governor. (Screenshot/Ron DeSantis for Governor/YouTube)

It’s common for parents to pass their political beliefs along to their children, but Republican Rep. Ron DeSantis is getting an early start as the latest ad for his Florida gubernatorial bid shows.

The spot features DeSantis’ wife Casey talking about how he was endorsed by President Donald Trump but he’s so much more than just pro-Trump.

Ocasio-Cortez Swipes Back at DeSantis for Dismissive Comment
GOP congressman running for Florida governor calls Democratic upstart ‘socialism wrapped in ignorance’

Rep. Ron DeSantis, R-Fla., criticized Democratic congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

They might never serve together in Congress but Rep. Ron DeSantis and left-wing insurgent Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez engaged in an old-fashioned partisan fracas.

The Florida Republican who is running for governor in Florida was caught on a video referring to Ocasio-Cortez, who upset Rep. Joe Crowley in their primary, as “this girl Ocasio-Cortez or whatever” and said she was “socialism wrapped in ignorance,” the New York Post reported.

Trump Tweets Endorsement for Gaetz From London
Freshman Florida congressman who has been ardent Trump supporter faces primary challenge

Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., was endorsed by President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump tweeted his support of Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz ahead of Florida’s primary.

Trump tweeted that Gaetz is “one of the finest and most talented people in Congress.”

Page’s Attorney Slams House Republicans’ ‘Bullying Tactics’
Judiciary Chairman Goodlatte says former FBI lawyer appears to have ‘something to hide’ in refusing subpoena

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., said it appeared that former FBI lawyer Lisa Page had “something to hide” after she refused to appear before his committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 10:33 a.m. | The attorney for former FBI lawyer Lisa Page, who refused to testify Wednesday before the House Judiciary Committee, said her client plans to testify and that the committee’s “bullying tactics” are unnecessary.

In a statement released Wednesday, Amy Jeffress said Page requires more time.

Rosenstein, Wray in Hot Seat Over Clinton Investigation IG Report
Goodlatte rails against bias while Nadler says there’s no evidence of that

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein arrives in the Capitol for a meeting with a bipartisan group of lawmakers on the FBI Russia’s Russia investigation in May. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday renewed their grilling of Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein and FBI Director Christopher Wray on the Department of Justice inspector general’s report on the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s private email server.

The report released earlier this month found officials at the DOJ committed numerous mistakes and failures over the course of the 2016 investigation.

Trump Backs Roby After Initial Icy Relationship
Roby said Trump should drop out in 2016, faces runoff for House seat

Rep. Martha Roby, R-Ala., received the support of President Donald Trump in a tweet on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump endorsed Alabama Rep. Martha Roby ahead of her primary runoff in the latest twist in their fraught relationship.

Trump tweeted his support for the 2nd District congresswoman on Friday morning, calling her a “consistent and reliable vote for our Make America Great Again agenda.”

DOJ Watchdog Report on Comey Stirs Politics on Hill
Sessions calls report an opportunity to learn from past mistakes

Former FBI Director James Comey testifies during a Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing on Thursday. On Friday, President Trump declared feeling “total and complete vindication.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Even before the results of an internal Justice Department probe were released Thursday, that report into former FBI Director James Comey’s actions during the 2016 presidential campaign had reopened deep political divisions and fueled fresh questions about congressional oversight of the agency’s work.

That’s unlikely to change during the upcoming week of hearings and headlines on Capitol Hill about the watchdog’s report, starting with a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing slated for Monday and another before the House Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform committees set for Tuesday.

Elections, Retirements Could Ransack GOP Baseball Roster
Turnover in the Democratic lineup not expected to be as dramatic

Reps. Rodney Davis of Illinois and Ryan A. Costello of Pennsylvania confer during the 2016 Congressional Baseball Game. Costello is retiring this year while Davis faces a competitive re-election race. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The cold reality of the midterm elections could force Republicans into a completely different roster for next year’s Congressional Baseball Game. Due to retirements and competitive re-election races, over a third of the 36-member GOP team may not be returning in 2019, including more than half of last year’s starting lineup.

Three of the Republicans’ first six batters from 2017 are playing in their last game because they aren’t seeking re-election, including leadoff hitter Ryan A. Costello of Pennsylvania.