Roll Call on the Road -- WV

West Virginia Newcomer Battles Carpetbagger Label

Mooney walks in the July Fourth parade. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

RIPLEY, W.Va. —  At the local Fourth of July parade, Alex Mooney proudly showed off his West Virginia concealed gun permit. The Republican's campaign colors are blue and gold — echoing the Mountain State’s flagship public college, West Virginia University. In a gold polo shirt, Mooney pointed to his son sporting a WVU baseball cap, standing near the campaign's pickup truck stuffed with gold balloons.  

In a place with a lot of Mountaineer pride, Mooney has outdone them all.  

Shelley Moore Capito Campaigns Amid Father's Complicated Legacy

Shelley Moore Capito at a Fourth of July event. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

RIPLEY, W.Va.— In Rep. Shelley Moore Capito's bid for Senate, Republicans and Democrats frequently cite one major political asset: Her middle name.  

It comes from her father, the beloved  former Gov. Arch A. Moore, Jr., who brought the Mountain State's infrastructure and education system into the modern age during his two separate tenures in the 1970s and 1980s.  

'Nicky Joe' Bets Political Survival on His Local Brand

Rahall, center, before he speaks to the crowd at the West Virginia Freedom Festival. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

LOGAN, W.Va. — The West Virginia Freedom Festival offered choices for Confederate flag accessories: jewelry, belts, pins and oven mitts. A couple blocks away, in the shadow of a “Hillbilly Mobile Zipline” platform, a Tennessee-based vendor called for a treason trial and eventual public execution of President Barack Obama.  

It's hard to find a Mountaineer who would go that far — but most of them blame Obama and his Environmental Protection Agency for the economic hardship plaguing the state’s coal miners. The anger toward Obama is so widespread that it's easy to see how it could taint anyone with even the most tenuous ties to him and his administration.  

Senate Hopefuls Work Parade Route in West Virginia

Miss WV Roadkill waves at fans at the Fourth of July parade. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

RIPLEY, W.Va. — The country's "largest small town Independence Day parade" had all the expected: beauty queens, sun-drenched crowds and political glad-handling.  

The hardest thing to find on this route? A West Virginian who plans to vote the straight party line this fall.