Robert C Scott

Trump on Course for Least Diverse Judicial Picks Since Reagan
President’s nominees have been overwhelmingly white and male

Greg Katsas was nominated by President Donald Trump for a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. He is seen here during his confirmation hearing last month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s picks for federal judgeships reflect a strikingly different direction when it comes to diversity on the bench — it is the most white and male group of nominees in recent history.

So far, 91 percent of Trump’s 58 judicial nominees for district and appeals courts are white, a pace that would make his appointees the least diverse since the Reagan administration, according to statistics compiled by the liberal advocacy group Alliance for Justice. Only 19 percent of his picks are women, a pace that would make his appointees the most male since the George H.W. Bush administration.

Thwarted by Congress, DeVos Seeks School Choice With Grants
She must also follow a presidential directive to fund STEM programs

devos_BC_008_060617

Congress has blocked school choice proposals from the Trump administration, but Education Secretary Betsy DeVos may have found a way to make choice a priority by awarding grants.

For Bobby Scott, a District Carved in Calm
Virginia Democrat takes business-as-usual approach, absent political rhetoric

Virginia Rep. Robert C. Scott speaks to attendees at a town hall in Norfolk on Monday. (D.A. Banks/CQ Roll Call)

NORFOLK, Va. — At a recent town hall here in Virginia’s second most populous city, Rep. Robert C. Scott patiently took questions from more than two dozen residents waiting in line. The queue stretched to the very back of a high school auditorium with some standing for the entire portion of the two-hour public meeting.

Absent was the rancor that has dominated town halls across the country this year — mostly those held by congressional Republicans facing angry crowds, upset over changes the GOP wants to make to the 2010 health care law and expressing steadfast opposition to Donald Trump’s presidency.

Rep. Scott Checks Out Local Brewery, Boat-Building Workshop Before Town Hall
 

Earlier this week Virginia Rep. Robert C. Scott stopped by the opening of a new brewery in the riverside town of Portsmouth, Va., alongside several other commonwealth leaders including Gov. Terry McAuliffe. The Democratic congressman also visited a wooden boat-building workshop and held a town hall in Norfolk.

This is the second report in an occasional series this recess where Roll Call visits members in their districts and shadows some of their daily activities.

Word on the Hill: Party Time
Burgers in Cannon today

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi speaks with her husband, Paul, center, and Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey at an Atlantic/CBS News pre-party before the 2016 White House Corespondents’ Association Dinner. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner is a day away. But Friday is a big night for parties to start the weekend off.

RealClearPolitics, the Distilled Spirits Council, the National Restaurant Association and the Beer Institute are joining for the first annual Toast to the First Amendment. It is from 7 to 10 p.m. at the National Restaurant Association, 2055 L St. NW.

Manchin: Pushing for a ‘Full Fix’ on Miner Benefits
December standoff brought only a stopgap deal

From left, Sens. Bob Casey and Joe Manchin III, and Reps. Matt Cartwright and Robert C. Scott conduct a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center to introduce miner’s health care legislation the "Black Lung Benefits Improvement Act of 2017" and the "Robert C. Byrd Mine Safety Protection Act of 2017." (Photo by Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The debate over miner health care and pensions that brought the Senate to the precipice of a government shutdown in December might be coming back.

Coal miners from the United Mine Workers have been all over the Capitol meeting with lawmakers in recent weeks.

Poll: Virginia Democrats Prefer Rep. Bobby Scott to Replace Kaine
Hillary Clinton maintains a large lead in the state

Virginia Rep. Robert C. Scott has held his 3rd District House seat since 1993. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Virginia Democrats prefer Rep. Robert C. Scott to take over the Senate seat of Tim Kaine if Democrat Hillary Clinton wins the White House and takes her running mate Kaine with her. 

The Judy Ford Wason Center for Public Policy/Christopher Newport University poll released Tuesday found that 27 percent of Old Dominion Democrats want to see Gov. Terry McAuliffe appoint Scott to the seat until a special election in 2017. 

Kaine Chooses To Play Attack Dog in Convention Speech
Vice presidential candidate makes little direct appeal to progressives

Democratic Nominee for Vice President Tim Kaine takes the stage. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated as of 11:45 p.m. |  Sen. Tim Kaine was not progressive Democrats' first pick for vice president, and he's unlikely to have changed many minds after his convention speech Wednesday.  

In his big introduction speech to the world, Kaine spent more time talking about Republican nominee Donald Trump than himself.  

Virginia's Democratic Governor Would Appoint Kaine Replacement
Number of Senate Democrats would not be impacted immediately if Kaine became VP

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, left, would appoint a senator to fill the vacancy created if Sen. Tim Kaine becomes vice president. Rep. Gerald E. Connolly could be a candidate for that appointment. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

While Sen. Tim Kaine was widely seen as the safest choice for presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's ticket, the Virginia Democrat's selection isn't without potential complications.  

Gov. Terry McAuliffe, a longtime ally of the Clintons, would assuredly appoint a Democrat to fill Kaine's seat if the first-term senator were to become vice president, but the resignation would prompt an unusual off-year Senate campaign in the commonwealth. The special election would align with the 2017 governor's race.  

Supreme Court Ruling Blocks Republican Redistricting Challenge
Justices say lower court ruling on Virginia map can't be challenged

The Supreme Court unanimously turned down Monday an appeal from Republican members of Congress. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday that a group of Republican members of Congress can’t challenge a lower court ruling that found an unconstitutional gerrymander created the lines for Virginia’s majority-black 3rd District held by Democratic Rep. Robert C. Scott .  

​The decision upholds the lower court ruling that ultimately created new districts for the November congressional elections  and quells any lingering uncertainty over the new district boundaries. Virginia's congressional primaries are scheduled for June 14.