Richard M Burr

Republicans Announce Charlotte as 2020 Convention Site
Democrats visited the North Carolina city in 2012

The Foo Fighters performed at the 2012 Democratic National Convention, which was also in Charlotte. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Republican National Committee formally announced Friday that its 2020 convention will take place in Charlotte, North Carolina.

“Charlotte has so much to offer, and we are excited to bring delegates to a city that has demonstrated its southern hospitality, showcased its vibrant energy, and proven that possibilities are endless. I am confident the Queen City will be the ideal backdrop as the Republican Party continues its work to Make America Great Again,“ site selection Chairman Ron Kaufman said in a statement.

Photos of the Week: Summer ’18 Continues With Hot Dogs, a Flood and, Of Course, Protests
The week of July 16 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Photographer Leandra Brown shoots photos of ballerina Sabrina Schulbach in midair on the East Plaza of the Capitol on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The summer is in full swing in Washington with the Hill abuzz after the president’s Helsinki meeting earlier this week with Russian President Vladimir Putin. The week saw demonstrators gather in front of the White House to protest President Donald Trump’s overseas summit.

Back at the Capitol, a summer staple — the hot dog lunch giveaway brought free food and former Major League Baseball greats to staffers of all kinds.

Senators Eye New Russia Sanctions as Trump Defends Putin Summit
Corker on GOP unity with Trump: 'It feels like the dam is breaking'

Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker says a few senators are crafting a resolution to call out President Donald Trump’s Helsinki performance, but he acknowledged such measures “don’t do anything.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As some senators discuss slapping new sanctions on Moscow, President Donald Trump is defending his widely panned summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin, tweeting he had a “great” meeting with NATO allies but an “even better” one with the Russian president.

While Trump and his team recover from a turbulent weeklong European swing in which the president attacked longtime American allies and dismissed the consensus findings of the U.S. intelligence community, one Republican senator said he senses GOP lawmakers’ insistence on standing by Trump no matter what could be weakening.

Senate Probe Continues to Back Up Intelligence on Trump-Russia
Latest update affirms ‘sound’ conclusions of the intelligence community

Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard M. Burr and Vice Chairman Mark Warner released their latest findings on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate Intelligence Committee continues to back up the findings of the intelligence community about Russia’s efforts to meddle in the 2016 presidential election, according to a new update.

In a new document on the panel’s progress, the Intelligence Committee also said it would release its review of the U.S. government’s handling of the so-called “Dossier” in a future part of its investigation.

Senate Intel Panel Moves to Improve Election Security
Intelligence authorization includes key changes to convoluted security clearance system.

Senate Intelligence Committee leaders Mark Warner, left, and Richard M. Burr, led their panel to approve a series of election security proposals. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate Intelligence Committee took action Tuesday on its latest effort to bolster election security against threats from Russian and other adversaries, and also to improve the broken security clearance process.

“In the wake of foreign efforts to interfere with the 2016 U.S. elections, which this Committee continues to investigate, I am pleased to see this bill contains comprehensive measures to enhance our election security,” Chairman Richard M. Burr of North Carolina said in a statement. “It is vital that we ensure our voting process remains fair and free from undue influence.”

From a Scream to a Whisper: Rescissions Push Goes Dark
Clock runs out on GOP effort to assuage Trump’s omnibus displeasure

Sen. Richard M. Burr, R-N.C., arrives in the Capitol on May 15. His decisive vote last week effectively drove a final dagger in a rescissions effort the president had sought. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After much sound and fury, President Donald Trump’s push to cut nearly $15 billion in unspent funds sitting in federal coffers ended with a whimper last week.

The House-passed rescissions plan was unceremoniously scuttled in the Senate on Wednesday when Republican Sen. Richard M. Burr of North Carolina cast the decisive vote against a discharge petition to advance the measure. With a 45-day clock expiring Friday — and senators long gone for the weekend — Republicans could no longer take advantage of filibuster protections under the 1974 budget law to advance the measure with a simple majority in the Senate.

Photos of the Week: Immigration Protests and the Congressional Women’s Softball Game
Photos of the week of June 18 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Aruna Miller, who is running for the Democratic nomination in Maryland’s 6th Congressional District, talks with citizens during early voting at the Activity Center at Bohrer Park in Gaithersburg, Md., on Monday. She stands behind the electioneering line which prevents a candidate from being too close to a voting site. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As always, it was a busy week in Washington as the summer heat hits in full force. The issue of families being separated at the border dominated Hill hearings and led to several protests throughout the capital city.

The Congressional Women’s Softball Game took place on Wednesday with the press team defeating the Congress team 5-0 in a five-inning victory that was called due to rain.

Intelligence Committee Staffer Indicted
James Wolfe, former director of staff security, is accused of lying to investigators about contact with reporters

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein passes James Wolfe, Senate Intelligence Committee director of staff security, after a committee hearing in May 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Justice Department indicted and arrested a longtime staffer for the Senate Intelligence Committee for lying to the FBI about his contacts with reporters.

The department announced on Thursday evening that James Wolfe, who served as director of staff security for the Senate Intelligence Committee, was indicted by a federal grand jury on three counts.

Trump Administration Tries to Reassure Key Senators About ZTE Enforcement
Cornyn said administration is making clear national security and trade are in separate buckets

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn said the defense authorization is expected to address ZTE. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Trump administration is trying to reassure Senate Republicans that it won’t go light on sanctions enforcement against Chinese communications equipment firm ZTE.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross huddled with a group of key GOP senators Wednesday evening.

Photos of the Week: Rain, National Police Week and Smokey Robinson
The week of May 14 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

The dome of the U.S. Capitol is seen through rain drops on the skylight of the Capitol Visitor Center on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A rainy week in Washington is coming to a close (though the rain seems intent on sticking around through the weekend). Some of the events this week on Capitol Hill included: a presidential visit to the GOP policy lunch, testimony from singer-songwriter legend Smokey Robinson, the premiere of Sen. John McCain's HBO documentary and oh, more rain.

Here's the entire week in photos: