Richard M Burr

Michael Flynn Gets Another Chance From Intelligence Committee
Panel seems ready to hold him in contempt of Congress

Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., and Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., want to give Michael Flynn one more chance to cooperate with their probe. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate Intelligence Committee is giving former national security adviser Michael Flynn another chance to produce documents about his interactions with Russian officials, even as the panel’s leaders are sending signals that they are unafraid to hold him in contempt of Congress.

The committee leadership has now sent a letter questioning the claim by Flynn and his lawyers that he can use the Fifth Amendment’s protection against self-incrimination to avoid producing documents subpoenaed by the panel.

Spy Work With Allies Could Chill After Trump Intel Spill
‘If this becomes habit with Trump or routine, then we’ve got a big problem with intelligence partners’

From left, Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, CIA Director Mike Pompeo, and Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats, appear during a Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee hearing in Hart Building titled "World Wide Threats" on May 11, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s decision to share with Russian officials highly classified information provided to the United States by an ally could chill cooperation with partner intelligence services, particularly if it becomes a routine occurrence.

The Washington Post reported Monday that the president divulged sensitive data about an alleged Islamic State plot to the Russian foreign minister and ambassador during a meeting in the Oval Office last week. The material was given to the United States by Israel, according to The New York Times.

Republican Senators Seek Answers After Chaotic Week
Two key panels pressure FBI, White House for documents

Intelligence Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., right, and ranking member Mark Warner, D-Va., conduct a Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee hearing in Hart Building titled “World Wide Threats” on May 11, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans are taking a more aggressive stance against the embattled Trump administration following a series of damning reports that have sent the White House and Congress into a tizzy.

But by and large, Republican leaders say they remain focused on their ambitious legislative agenda.

Photos of the Week: Sally Yates, Town Halls and the Post-Comey Chaos
The week of May 8 as seen by Roll Call's photographers

A Senate staffer attempts to deliver a poster to the hearing room where former acting Attorney General Sally Yates and former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper were set to testify during a hearing on “Russian Interference in the 2016 United States Election” on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sasse: Possibility of Hacks in 2018, 2020 ‘Keeps Me Up at Night’
‘We know what the Russians are trying to do’

Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., is concerned about additional Russian interference. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Ben Sasse is a member of one of the committees investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 election, but he’s more worried about the upcoming congressional midterms and beyond. 

“We need to know a lot more about 2016. But the thing that keeps me up at night is 2018 and 2020” the Nebraska Republican said in an interview with NPR’s Steve Inskeep Friday morning. “We know what the Russians are trying to do. We know that the technology around info-ops is getting better and better.”

Western North Carolina Notices Meadows’ Newfound Notoriety
Supporters and protesters greet Freedom Caucus chairman back home

Rep. Mark Meadows gives advice to middle school students in McDowell County, North Carolina preparing for a cardboard boat competition. (Lindsey McPherson/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Mark Meadows has long been a household name in western North Carolina, but his newfound notoriety outside the 11th District has not gone unnoticed by those back home.

“If you watch TV at all you know that our congressman is very much a mover and shaker in Washington, D.C.,” South Caldwell High School teacher Tony Crump said, as he introduced Meadows at a masonry competition Thursday for three area high schools.

McCabe and Rosenstein, a Photo Chronology
Acting FBI director, deputy attorney general take Capitol Hill

From left, Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, chairman Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., and CIA Director Mike Pompeo greet each other before the start of the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee hearing on “World Wide Threats” on Thursday, May 11, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rosenstein Cameo Adds Drama to Hectic Hill Day
Meeting with Senate Intel leaders catches observers off guard

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, prepares to leave a meeting with Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., and Ranking Member Mark Warner, D-Va., after a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing in the Hart Building titled "World Wide Threats" on May 11, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By TODD RUGER and RYAN LUCAS, CQ Roll Call

For a longtime federal prosecutor who won bipartisan praise from lawmakers for his professional integrity, Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein quickly finds his reputation in the political frying pan.

Trump-Russia Probe — Congress Can Boost Stature or Squander Opportunity
Bipartisan effort could help restore credibility

Reporters question Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard M. Burr in the Senate subway as he makes his way to the Russell Senate Office Building on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

An important window of opportunity has been opened for Congress by the firing of James B. Comey as director of the FBI. 

Post-Comey Senate Forecast Is Turbulent
Procedural roadblocks could set back legislative ambitions

Aides to Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer declined to comment on what steps Democrats planned to take should none of their demands on the Russia probe be met. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

BY JOE WILLIAMS AND NIELS LESNIEWSKI

A partisan standoff in the fallout of the firing of FBI Director James B. Comey could significantly stall the Senate legislative calendar, as Democrats appear ready to utilize procedural rules to coerce Republicans into acting on a number of demands.