religion

Bush Doesn’t See Eye to Eye With Trump on Media, Muslim Ban
‘We need an independent media to hold people like me to account’

Asked if a special prosecutor was necessary to look into ties between President Donald Trump and his associates and Russia, former President George W. Bush replied, “you’re talking to the wrong guy.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President George W. Bush defended the media and expressed differing views from President Donald Trump on the Muslim ban and immigration during an interview Monday.

Despite getting his fair share of grief from the media, Bush told the “Today Show” that journalists and the media are crucial to governing, a stark difference from Trump’s condemnation of some media outlets as enemies of the state.

Guest List: Who Members of Congress Are Taking to Trump’s Address
President to make first speech to joint session of Congress on Tuesday

The guest lists are out for President Donald Trump’s first address to a joint session of Congress. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump will hold his first joint session address to Congress on Tuesday and every member is able to bring a guest to sit in the gallery.

Oftentimes, those invited are a part of what is driving the news of the day.

Trump Embraces Christian Charity? Not So Much
President displays a tolerance for intolerance

Supreme Court Justice John Roberts administers the oath of office to U.S. President Donald Trump as his wife Melania Trump holds the Bible and son Barron Trump looks on, on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Donald Trump was sworn in using two Bibles, the one Lincoln used during his first inauguration and a family copy.

If he’s read either of them, he knows that Jesus separates the sheep from the goats — the people going to heaven from those going to hell — by how they treated their fellow men and women.

Trump White House Lets First Routine Week Slip Away
Administration clashes with reporters over invitation-only Q&A session

Trump walks to the Oval Office after arriving back at the White House after his CPAC speech on Friday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

The Trump White House was close to pulling off its first drama-free week after a month of chaos, but on Friday, the new administration reverted to the norm.

The new president and his team seemed to be settling in over the last seven days. Donald Trump quickly named a new, well-respected national security adviser. They held off on a coming executive order limiting who can enter the country so relevant federal agencies could weigh in. And senior White House officials stayed on message.

Kellyanne Conway Breaks Silence, Advises Less Time on Twitter
Despite Trump’s penchant for tweets, close aide makes pitch to ‘live in real time’

Donald Trump counselor Kellyanne Conway’s CPAC interview was her first public appearance in a week. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Kellyanne Conway, once President Donald Trump’s most visible proponent, broke her week-long silence Thursday by telling a friendly crowd they should spend less time on Twitter.

Notably, her boss did just that before her appearance at the Conservative Political Action Caucus (CPAC), a rare instance when the president held his fire during the morning news shows.

Town Hall Mostly Civil, Emmer Doesn’t Have to Leave
Chief of staff had said congressman would leave if crowd got unruly

Rep. Tom Emmer, R-Minn., had a civil discussion at his town hall after threatening to leave if it got too raucous. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After initially threatening to cancel a town hall if it got too rowdy, Minnesota Republican Rep. Tom Emmer saw a mostly civil back and forth with constituents.

Emmer apologized for holding the event at the Sartell City Hall, which held 150 people and left many of the hundreds of people who were in line outside, the Duluth News Tribune reported.

Washington Governor Inslee’s Profile Rises With Trump-Thumping
Ex-congressman downplays inclusion in 2020 presidential conversation

Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington has gained national exposure after the state's legal wins in a lawsuit against President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration. (Tom Williams/Roll Call file photo)

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee’s national profile is on the rise as an outspoken advocate for the state’s legal battle against President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration.

Inslee, along with state Attorney General Bob Ferguson, has done a few victory laps after the state’s wins earlier this month in a lawsuit to block Trump’s order temporarily halting travel from seven Muslim-majority countries.

White House Not Dropping Travel Ban Court Fight
Justice Department had indicated otherwise, though Trump was murky

Passengers from a Saudi Arabian Airlines flight from Jeddah are greeted by protesters as they arrive at Dulles International Airport in Virginia on Jan. 29. Protests erupted at airports around the country following President Trump’s since-blocked executive order restricting travel from several Islamic countries. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Pool)

The Trump administration says it is keeping up its court fight to revive an executive order banning entry in the United States by people from Syria and six other Muslim-majority countries, despite Justice Department lawyers stating the opposite.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said Tuesday the administration is moving ahead on dual paths: a new executive order that should be issued in a few days, and a continued legal fight over the initial order.

Robbing the Poor to Pay Paul Ryan’s Pals
Speaker may have powerful ally for assault on Medicaid

Speaker Paul D. Ryan Ryan has another shot at Medicaid with longtime ally Tom Price running the Department of Health and Human Services, Jonathan Allen writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan wants you to know that he cares about the poor. He wants you to know that his deeply held Catholic convictions drive him to seek opportunity for those in poverty, particularly people of color.

He speaks in the compassionate tones of someone who means to help not harm, and I believe that these are his real values, even if I often don’t agree with his policy prescriptions.

Rep. Reed Surprises Sit-In Participants
New York Republican has two-hour discussion at district office

Rep. Tom Reed, R-N.Y., surprised constituents who were requesting a town hall. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Tom Reed, R-N.Y., surprised people staging a sit-in at a district office when he dropped by Thursday after a meeting with President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence in Washington.

Six people from Ithaca Catholic Workers began the sit-in on Tuesday to highlight that Reed not holding a town hall since May 2, 2016. Reed arrived around 10:30 p.m. on Thursday.