religion

Challenger Nicholson’s Parents Max Out Contributions to Baldwin
Nicholson was once head of the College Democrats of America

Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wisc., received maximum donations from Republican challenger Kevin Nicholson’s parents. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Kevin Nicholson’s parents aren’t being very encouraging when it comes to his bid to beat Sen. Tammy Baldwin — both donated the maximum allowed to the Wisconsin Democratic incumbent.

Federal Election Commission documents showed each of Nicholson’s parents donated $2,700 to Baldwin’s campaign.

Analysis: Response to Abuse Charges Dulls Trump’s Religious Message
President urges Americans to be generous to all, but he’s silent on Porter matter

President Donald Trump, seen here at his State of the Union address, told the audience at the National Prayer Breakfast “we praise God for how truly blessed we are to be American.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump on Thursday merged his “America first” governing philosophy with his religious views, saying Americans should feel lucky God placed them here.

But Trump’s religious-based message about being generous to one another and following God’s path to become “heroes to everybody” aligns imperfectly with how he and his staff have handled on-the-record allegations of domestic abuse by one of his closest aides.

Active-Duty Candidates Can Run — But Can They Campaign?
Even Matt Reel’s staff doesn’t know where he’s deployed

Matt Reel is running for Congress. But he’s also on active duty. (Screen Shot/Matt Reel for Congress/YouTube)

Matt Reel is running for Congress. But he can’t campaign until June — two months before Tennessee’s August primary.

Even if his staff knew where he is — which they don’t — and even if he had time while overseas, Reel can’t legally communicate with them about campaign strategy for his 7th District race while he’s on active duty.

Immigration Crackdown Raises Fears of Seeking Health Care
Enforcement under the Trump administration sends the sick into the shadows

An undocumented immigrant from Peru holds her son in June 2017 at their home in Thornton, Colorado. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Many people get nervous any time they need to go to the doctor. But in the past year, some U.S. residents became more concerned than usual.

Immigrants around the country who are on edge about broader enforcement under the Trump administration have been skipping appointments, questioning whether enrolling in government-funded health care coverage could undermine their immigration applications and showing anxiety about visiting unfamiliar physicians, according to nearly two dozen medical providers and lawyers interviewed recently.

Vitter’s Wife Nominated by Trump for Federal Judgeship in Louisiana
Wendy Vitter stayed with her husband amid ‘D.C. Madam’ scandal

Wendy Vitter is seen here in 2005 as her husband, Louisiana Sen. David Vitter, is sworn in to the 109th Congress by Vice President Dick Cheney. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump nominated former Louisiana Sen. David Vitter’s wife for a federal judgeship in Louisiana on Tuesday.

Wendy Vitter, who currently serves as general counsel of the Roman Catholic Church of the Archdiocese of New Orleans, would become a U.S. district court judge for the Eastern District of Louisiana upon confirmation in the Senate.

Arizona’s Double-Barrel Rejection of President Trump’s ‘Fake News’
Flake, McCain offer defenses of the free press ahead of Trump’s awards

Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake gave a speech on the Senate floor Wednesday in defense of the free press. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Arizona’s two Republican senators asserted themselves Wednesday as defenders of the free press.

Jeff Flake took to the Senate floor for a well-publicized defense of the truth, as President Donald Trump was potentially preparing for an Orwellian “fake news” award ceremony.

Opinion: White People in Norway? Who Knew?
Kirstjen Nielsen displays the rhetorical contortions necessary to serve under Trump

Kirstjen Nielsen might want to stay away from categories on Norway or basic geography if she ever appears on “Jeopardy” — especially if the answer is, “What’s a Scandinavian country with lots of white people?” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

At the conclusion of more than four hours of testimony Tuesday before an often hostile Senate Judiciary Committee, Kirstjen Nielsen, the new secretary of Homeland Security, slowly gathered up her papers, shared a few laughing words with Arizona Republican Jeff Flake (the last senator in the room) and confidently exited surrounded by an armada of aides.

Depending on her level of self-awareness and the degree of flattery from her staffers, Nielsen may have nurtured the belief that she aced her Capitol Hill exam. After all, the loyal Cabinet secretary avoided saying almost anything controversial, even when pressed by Democrats over Donald Trump’s doubly confirmed reference to “shithole countries” during last Thursday’s White House immigration meeting that she attended.

Members of Both Parties Criticize Trump’s Vulgar Immigration Remark
After White House initially doesn’t deny accounts, Trump tweets early Friday that he didn’t say it

President Donald Trump early Friday said that he didn’t call Haiti and African countries “shithole countries” despite multiple media reports of accounts from lawmakers who were in a meeting about immigration policy. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images file photo)

Members of both parties roundly criticized President Donald Trump after the Washington Post reported he called Haiti and African countries “shithole countries.”

The White House did not initially deny that Trump made the remarks in a bipartisan meeting about immigration.

Pence Delays Middle East Trip With Tax Vote Looming
Tour rescheduled for January

Vice President Mike Pence waves walking through the Capitol. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Vice President Mike Pence is delaying his trip to the Middle East until mid-January, a move that could allow tensions in the region to cool after President Donald Trump angered Muslim leaders by recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and announcing his intention to move the U.S. embassy there.

Pence aides are describing the delay as, in part, intended to allow the vice president to remain in Washington to preside over the Senate’s vote on a sweeping tax overhaul bill.

Opinion: The Commandments According to Roy Moore Take a Hit
Pride goes before a political trouncing — and the more humble man goes to Washington

A sign outside the Living Ways Ministries church in Opelika, Ala., after the words “Vote Roy Moore” were removed shortly before the Alabama Senate election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

In the Alabama Senate race, both sides went to church — Republican Roy Moore and Democrat Doug Jones took their appeals to their faithful, which, for the most part, worship the same God but came to wildly different electoral conclusions.

On Tuesday, Jones won. The miracle of a Democrat winning a statewide race in deep-red Alabama actually happened. It was not the divine intervention Moore had prayed for, perhaps pointing out the danger when you so shamelessly use the word of the Lord to divide.