Primaries

John Curtis Wins GOP Primary for Chaffetz’s Seat in Utah
Provo mayor had been attacked for his Democratic past

Utah Republican John Curtis won the 3rd District Republican primary on Tuesday. (Courtesy John Curtis Facebook page)

Provo Mayor John Curtis has won the Republican primary to replace former Rep. Jason Chaffetz in Utah’s 3rd District.

With 91 percent of precincts reporting, Curtis had 41 percent of the vote, The Associated Press reported. The other two contenders, former state Rep. Chris Herrod and businessman Tanner Ainge, trailed with 31 percent and 28 percent, respectively. 

Could Trump Shake Up the Alabama Senate Race?
President backs incumbent Luther Strange one week before GOP primary

Alabama Sen. Luther Strange arrives for a candidate forum held by the Shelby County Republican Party in Pelham, Ala., on Aug. 4. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump threw his political weight behind Republican Sen. Luther Strange just days before Alabama voters head to the polls in the special election for the remaining term of former Sen. Jeff Sessions. How other candidates respond could determine whether that endorsement makes a difference.

Polls show Strange, Rep. Mo Brooks and former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore are the top three contenders in the crowded Republican primary field. Strange was appointed to the seat in February after Sessions resigned to become attorney general.

Alabama GOP Candidates Battle Over Who’s Most Conservative
Trump still a factor in Republican Senate primary one week before election

Alabama Sen. Luther Strange, left, speaks with a supporter after a candidate forum in Pelham, Ala., on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

PELHAM, Ala.— One week before the Alabama special election Senate primary, Republican contenders are battling over who is the true conservative and who will be the strongest fighter for President Donald Trump.

That was evident Friday night when eight of the nine candidates showed up at a candidate forum at the civic center here. The Shelby County Republican Party’s event was one of the rare events where the top three contenders — Sen. Luther Strange, former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore and Rep. Mo Brooks — were in the same room.

California GOP Incumbents Will Make Democrats’ Challenge Expensive
Democrats hope to flip nine of 14 Republican-held seats in 2018

Rep. Ed Royce is one of several California GOP incumbents gearing up for expensive re-election fights. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

National Democrats hope disapproval of President Donald Trump will help flip nine of California’s 14 Republican-held congressional seats, but campaign finance reports show Republican incumbents will make it expensive for them.

Six of them raised at least $750,000 during the first half of 2017, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. While Democratic challengers have raised less so far, they’ll get help from the party and outside groups past the primaries.

Brooks Tries to Break Through in Alabama Senate Primary
GOP lawmaker meets with voters to counteract deluge of negative ads

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks, a candidate in the state’s special election GOP Senate primary, takes a break from campaigning at a stop in Jacksonville, Ala., to call in to a radio station for an interview. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

JACKSONVILLE, Ala. — When Rep. Mo Brooks walked into Crow Drug Health Mart here late Thursday morning, he was greeted with a reality check.

“The Luther ads have killed you. Not killed you, but they have made a difference,” said Jay Colvin, a middle-aged pharmacist who owns the store on the perimeter of the town square. 

Wasserman Schultz Defends Keeping Fired IT Worker
‘I believe that I did the right thing, and I would do it again,’ Florida congresswoman says

Florida Democratic Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz said she believes fired IT worker Imran Awan is getting additional scrutiny because he is Muslim. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz defended keeping a fired IT worker on her payroll despite the fact he was banned from the House network and fired by another member of Congress. 

Wasserman Schultz said it would have been easier to fire Imran Awan.

Missouri’s Josh Hawley Forms Exploratory Committee for Senate Bid
GOP donors have been urging the state attorney general to challenge McCaskill

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., greets newly elected Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley (right) prior to speaking to supporters in Springfield, Missouri in November. (Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images)

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley has formed an exploratory committee with the Federal Election Commission for a challenge to Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill.

“Josh’s state campaign committee has ceased expenditures and the soliciting or accepting of donations while he considers becoming a federal candidate,” Hawley spokesman Scott Paradise said in an email, according to the Kansas City Star

At the Races: Royce Challenger Gives Himself $2 Million Head Start
First woman Marine combat pilot challenges Barr in Kentucky; former Obama ambassador running in Colorado

California insurance executive Andy Thorburn kicked off his challenge to Republican Rep. Ed Royce with a $2 million loan to his campaign. (Andy Thorburn for Congress)

A new Democratic challenger to California Republican Rep. Ed Royce is kicking off his candidacy by pumping $2 million into his campaign and an ad with him being sent to jail.

Insurance executive Andy Thorburn released a video Tuesday announcing he would challenge Royce and that he is willing to use his personal wealth to back up his campaign. Thorburn told the Los Angeles Times that he had deferred running for office because of the difficulty of balancing campaigning and running his business, but the election of President Donald Trump changed that.

Opinion: Summertime and the Living Is Easy in Trump’s Washington
But there’s still time for a cornered chief executive to lash out

The danger with President Donald Trump is that when he feels cornered, he lashes out in irrational directions, Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Thursday was the kind of molasses-slow news day in Washington, reminiscent of the summers before air-conditioning when Congress and most of the Executive Branch fled the capital for sea breezes and temperate climes.

For the sake of historians chronicling the torpor of the Trump years, here are some of the things that happened on this forgettable Thursday:

Opinion: Despite Pressure, John McCain Chose Honor
Arizona Republican stood tall on health care vote

Arizona Sen. John McCain, flanked by Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, left, and Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, stands as a champion for millions of Americans who would have been harmed by the Senate GOP health care bill, Allen writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Way back in 2004, when America’s wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were still in their infancy, Arizona Sen. John McCain recommended that his Republican colleagues in Washington back away from tax cuts as a sign of national sacrifice for the war efforts.

His words infuriated House Republicans, many of whom saw him as insufficiently patriotic to the GOP cause and some of whom liked to whisper that his ordeal as a prisoner of war in Vietnam wasn’t all that bad.