Presidential race

Moore Campaign Removes Endorsement From Deceased Conservative Leader
Phyllis Schlafly died a year ago

Phyllis Schlafly greets supporters at last year’s Republican convention in Cleveland. The conservative activist died later in the year. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images File Photo)

Former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore is racking up endorsements from inside the state and around the country for his challenge to Republican Sen. Luther Strange, but one in particular stood out: renowned — and deceased — conservative leader Phyllis Schlafly.

Schlafly died on Sept. 5, 2016, at the age of 92, two months before Donald Trump won the presidential election and four months before Republican Jeff Sessions left his Senate seat in order to become attorney general, yet she was included on the endorsements page of Moore’s campaign website. 

Rohrabacher’s Democratic Opponents Slam Comments About Charlottesville
Rohrabacher called violence during white supremacist rally a ‘total hoax’

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., is under fire for calling racial violence in Charlottesville, Va., “a total hoax.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Two of California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher's Democratic opponents lambasted him for calling racial violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, last month a “total hoax.”

In an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle, Rohrabacher said it was possible that a “former Hillary (Clinton) or Bernie (Sanders) supporter” organized “Civil War re-enactors” to rally around a statue of Robert E. Lee.

Weiner’s Lawyers Say Teen Sexting Partner Wanted to Influence Election
Disgraced former congressman to be sentenced Sept. 25

Former Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner exits federal court in Manhattan after pleading guilty in his sexting case in May. (Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images file photo)

Lawyers for disgraced former Rep. Anthony Weiner claim that the teenage girl to whom he sent explicit messages wanted to influence the 2016 presidential election.

Weiner’s lawyers said that Weiner never sought out teenage girls, The Associated Press reported. But they admitted that Weiner’s acts were “born of deep sickness.”

Second Meeting of Trump Election Commission Brings Fresh Criticism
New Hampshire officials do not roll out welcome mat

From left, former Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner at a meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity on Tuesday in Manchester, N.H. (Holly Ramer/AP)

A host of fresh criticism rained down on President Donald Trump’s commission on voter fraud Tuesday as it held its second meeting since the panel’s creation in May.

Most of the harshness was directed at Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, a Republican who led the meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in his capacity as vice chairman. Vice President Mike Pence, the panel’s chairman, was not present.

Opinion: The Two-Party System on a Sick Bed
It will take more than Trump and infighting to kill the patient

The two-party system is here to stay despite rocky times in the recent past and ahead, Shapiro writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It is as lasting an American literary metaphor as Captain Ahab and the white whale or Hester Prynne and her scarlet “A.”

We are, of course, referring to that branch of science known as cartoon thermodynamics. The first law, as popularized by the late film critic Roger Ebert, is worthy of Isaac Newton: “Any body suspended in space will remain in space until made aware of its situation.”

Donald Trump Jr. Talks to Senate Investigators
But details beyond opening statement remain private for now

Reporters hold up their smart phones to try to catch a photo of Donald Trump Jr., as he returns to a meeting with the Senate Judiciary staff on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump Jr. spent about five hours Thursday answering questions from Senate Judiciary Committee staff about a meeting he set up between his father’s presidential campaign and a Russian lawyer, but the details beyond his opening statement remain private for now.

Several senators attended the closed-door, voluntary interview with the president’s son, part of the committee’s probe into possible Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Only Senate staffers asked questions, however, and the committee will have to vote at a later time on whether to make the transcript public.

For Joe Donnelly, a Long History of Bucking His Party
Indiana Democrat faces challenging re-election, which is also nothing new

Sen. Joe Donnelly often goes his own way on hot-button policy positions, and has since his time in the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

EVANSVILLE, Ind. — The fate of Indiana Sen. Joe Donnelly’s re-election bid next year may lie in his ability to convince Hoosiers he’s not always on the same page as the national Democratic Party. Fortunately for him, he has a lot of practice, and has been highly successful at it, going back more than a dozen years.

“The party occasionally gets mad, I really don’t care,” said one of the Democrats’ most endangered incumbents.

Intel Committee Might Want to Hear From Rohrabacher on Russia
Democrats say he should be stripped of chairmanship of subcommittee on Russia

An aide to Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, D-Calif., said he would be happy to talk to the Senate Intelligence Committee about information he said he got from Wikileaks on last year’s DNC hack — after he shares it with President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate Intelligence Committee might want California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher to testify about his meeting with WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange.

“He hasn’t been contacted by the committee, but is happy to talk with them after he talks with President Trump,” Ken Grubbs, an aide to the Republican, said to CNN in its report.

On Afghanistan, Trump Bets On Generals He Once Criticized
President says ‘my original instinct was to pull out’

U.S. Army Gen. John Nicholson (right) shakes hands with troops ahead of a handover ceremony at Leatherneck Camp in Lashkar Gah in the Afghan province of Helmand on April 29, 2017. (Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images)

Candidate Donald Trump often said he knew more when it came to the country’s foes than America’s top military leaders. But by siding with retired and current four-star generals on Afghanistan, Trump placed a big bet on a group he once believed had been “reduced to rubble.”

Trump announced Monday night at Joint Base Fort Myer Hamilton Hall in Arlington, Va., he will keep thousands of U.S. troops in Afghanistan despite his long-held disdain for the operation there. The president’s decision came after a months-long review by his national security team, and reports indicate he will raise the American military presence there to around 12,000.

GOP Leadership Silent on Bannon’s Departure
Many House and Senate Republicans ignore White House chaos

House Speaker Paul Ryan, left, and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, right, often avoid addressing controversy surrounding the presidency of Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Almost two hours after news broke Friday that President Donald Trump decided to part ways with White House chief strategist Steve Bannon, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy  — at least at that moment — had another topic on his mind.

He retweeted a message that the chief executive sent out Friday morning, before Bannon’s ouster was reported, about elevating the country’s Cyber Command. McCarthy called it “the right move.”