polling

Capitol Hill Staff Is Sleepier Than Last Year, So Far
Survey shows staffers are working longer hours in the 115th Congress

Late nights are part of working on Capitol Hill, especially in the 115th Congress.

Trump Comes Out Swinging Against Familiar Foes
Ignoring stumbles, president says administration is a ‘fine-tuned machine’

President Donald Trump focused on familiar targets in his news conference on Thursday. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Thursday handed the Senate a new Labor secretary nominee who has previously been approved by the chamber three times — but he used the next 75 minutes to rouse his base and goad his critics. 

Trump walked into the East Room of the White House and announced that Alexander Acosta, a former assistant attorney general, will be his second pick to run the Labor Department after fast-food mogul Andrew Puzder withdrew his nomination on Wednesday.

Pro-Pot Lawmakers to Join Forces, Launch Cannabis Caucus
Move comes amid uncertainty for state marijuana laws under Trump

Inventory including “Merry N’Berry” on display at the medical marijuana dispensary Takoma Wellness Center, in Washington, D.C. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers looking to draw attention to pet issues have formed groups in favor of everything from auto care to zoos. Now, there’s a caucus for cannabis. 

Rep. Earl Bluemenauer said the move — to be announced at a press conference Thursday — is a sign of how mainstream the drive for marijuana legalization has become.

Like Democrats Before Them, GOP Dismisses Town Hall Threat
There’s little data to gauge electoral threat protests pose for 2018

New Jersey Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen says he’ll be sticking with tele-town halls for the near future. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Ask Republican lawmakers about the specter of protests in their districts next week, and they’ll likely shrug off constituent outbursts as “manufactured” or “scripted.” 

The GOP is largely adopting the Democratic posture from the summer of 2009 that angry voices at town halls don’t represent a political threat. That may be true. The question is how Republicans now, and Democrats back then, arrived at that conclusion. 

Poll: More Say Trump’s Immigration Order Increases National Security
But opinion divided whether the president's policy will keep the U.S. safe from terrorism

A new poll shows public opinion is divided over President Donald Trump's executive action on immigration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Most Americans think President Donald Trump’s travel ban order will make the U.S. more secure, although not everyone considers his policies will keep the U.S. safe from terrorism, a new poll shows.

Forty-three percent of those polled said they think Trump’s executive order imposing a ban on immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries will increase national security, 24 percent said it will cause a decrease, and 15 percent said it will have no effect. The remaining 18 percent said they weren’t sure, according to a Economist/YouGov poll released Wednesday.

House Democrats’ ‘All of the Above’ Approach
A party seeking unity pursues multiple paths to success

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi and her caucus spent their issues conference in Baltimore taking stock, but did not appear to coalesce around a specific strategy going forward. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

BALTIMORE — House Democratic leaders say their caucus is united, but even a minimal survey of lawmakers indicates skepticism of the messaging, an unclear path on strategy, and merely the beginning of grappling with what went wrong in an election that left them in the minority six years running.

“The mood of the members is very positive, open, confident, humble enough to listen to other ideas,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said at the Democrats’ issues retreat here. “There’s a real, deep commitment to working families in our country and that’s what unifies us.”

Did McConnell Put Warren Right Where He Wants Her?
Senate GOP boss elevates left‘s hero, maybe because she‘s not strongest 2020 Democratic option

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell may be hoping that Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren becomes the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee in 2020. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Sure, he’s a really buttoned-down guy working to prevent the Senate from getting totally bottled-up, but there are solid reasons to suspect Mitch McConnell wants a “Nevertheless, she persisted” hoodie as much as anyone.

The majority leader is obviously much more Brooks Brothers than Raygun. Still, he may well realize that his latest grandmaster move in the never-ending game of electoral chess requires ditching the rep stripe tie in favor of some printed-on-demand slogan swag.

Celebrating Black History Month With Added Resonance
Obama retirement, record number of black lawmakers mark 2017

Former President Barack Obama's departure from the East Front of the Capitol on Jan. 20 was a bittersweet moment for African-American members of Congress. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Black History Month this year has taken on an added resonance, reflected in the record number of African-Americans in Congress.

In the Senate, it has been a long buildup to the current high-water mark of three members: Republican Tim Scott of South Carolina and Democrats Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California. 

Word on the Hill: How Would D.C. Fare in Trade War With Mexico?
A great place to take a nap

D.C. has the least amount of imports from Mexico as a percentage of total imports. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Except for Alaska, the District of Columbia would be least affected by the economic fallout of a trade war with Mexico, a new study shows.

The most affected states would be Texas, Arizona, and Michigan, according to the WalletHub study. D.C. ranked 50th, just ahead of Alaska.

Trump's Iran Sanctions Mirror Obama's
Pelosi: 'What do the Russians have on President Trump?'

President Donald Trump departs the White House on Feb. 1 aboard Marine One. He left on the executive helicopter again Friday for a weekend at his golf resort in South Florida. (John T. Bennett/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump jetted off Friday for his first weekend away from the White House after his first two weeks in office, capping off 14 days in which his administration moved aggressively to move on his campaign promises and take shots at the Obama era. Yet, as the president heads for his Mar-a-Lago retreat in South Florida, his first two weeks produced little clarity about the next four years.

The administration’s emerging Iran policy, in many ways, embodies its first two weeks.