polling

Poll: Most Americans Disapprove of Trump’s Subsidy Slash
Two senators reached bipartisan deal Tuesday to fund cost-reducing subsidies

Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., reached an agreement Tuesday to fund cost-sharing reduction payments the president axed from the executive schedule last week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Most Americans disapprove of President Donald Trump’s decision to end Obama-era federal subsidies to insurers that lower costs for low- and middle-income families, a new poll found.

Fifty-three percent of respondents to an Economist/YouGov poll conducted Oct. 15 and 16 said they disapproved of the executive move, compared to 31 percent who were in favor. Sixteen percent declined to give an opinion.

Hatch Raises $936K Amid Re-Election Speculation
Previously said he would not seek an additional term

From left, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., Senate Finance Committee chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., participate in the Congressional GOP media availability to unveil the GOP tax reform plan in the Capitol on Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Orrin Hatch raised $936,992 in the most recent fundraising quarter amid speculation about whether he will seek an eighth term.

After re-election in 2012, the Utah Republican said this term would be his last. But Donald Trump’s election and the prospect of tax reform made the Senate’s most senior Republican reconsider.

With One Now in the White House, Celebrities Crowd the Political Stage
It doesn’t end with Kid Rock; actors, a former Olympian and one of the ”sexiest men alive” plan to run

Kid Rock may have been among the first celebrities to emerge as a potential candidate in 2018, but he wasn’t the last. (Theo Wargo/Getty Images)

That led to chatter that Peyton Manning, the legendary NFL and University of Tennessee quarterback, could take the Republican senator’s Tennessee seat. But with Manning quickly quashing speculation he would make the race, Kid Rock was back on top.

“We will be scheduling a press conference in the next 6 weeks or so to address this issue amongst others, and if I decide to throw my hat in the ring for US Senate, believe me …  it’s game on mthrfkers,” his campaign website states.

In Iowa, Heartland Democrats Ask ‘What About the Economy, Stupid?’
But candidates are divided on how populist their messages need to be

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan talks with Heather Ryan (no relation), a Democratic candidate in Iowa’s 3rd District, during a steak fry in Des Moines on Sept. 30. (Charlie Neibergall/AP File Photo)

DES MOINES, Iowa — Democrats in the Midwest know that the way to win back voters in states like Iowa is to talk about the economy, but they’re debating how exactly to do it.

As a state that can make or break presidential campaignsand one that had regularly sent liberal Democrats to Washington, Iowa now serves as a test of whether Democrats can win back white voters who have swung toward the Republican Party over the last decade.

Democratic Poll: Poliquin Narrowly Leads Potential Self-Funder in Maine
Lucas St. Clair leads Democratic primary field by double digits

At least six Democrats are seeking their party’s nomination to challenge Rep. Bruce Poliquin in Maine’s 2nd District. (Tom Williams/Roll Call File Photo)

At least six Democrats are running to challenge Maine Republican Bruce Poliquin in a district President Donald Trump carried by 10 points last fall. 

A new poll from the Democratic pollster Global Strategy Group gives Lucas St. Clair a double-digit lead over the rest of the Democratic primary field. The poll was paid for by “an independent organization with an interest” in the 2nd District, according to a Democratic activist in the state. 

Vulnerable Republicans Try to Navigate Immigration
Talks continue on how to address legal status of so-called Dreamers

Florida Rep. Carlos Curbelo says he is working on a bipartisan immigration bill. (Bill Clark/Roll Call)

What happens to undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children is an issue that could loom large for several House Republicans facing tough re-election races next year.

Doing something to help those immigrants, also known as Dreamers, could win over some voters in their districts, especially Latinos. But that could also alienate Republican voters who want stricter immigration controls.

Feinstein Says Seniority is Key Asset in Navigating Trump Era
California senator tells donors she thought, ‘Maybe I should just walk away’

While some Democrats hoped that California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein, left, would retire, she has the support of Kamala Harris, the state’s junior senator. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Donald Trump’s supporters chant for the president, a political outsider, to “drain the swamp,” Sen. Dianne Feinstein has taken a different tone on Washington mainstays.

“Seniority matters,” the five-term Democrat said at a campaign fundraiser Tuesday in Beverly Hills, California, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Dianne Feinstein to Run for Re-Election
The long-time senator will run for a 5th term

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., announced she is running for a fifth Senate term. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Dianne Feinstein announced Monday that she will run for re-election to the Senate. The California Democrat is the most senior female senator.

“I am running for reelection to the Senate,” Feinstein tweeted Monday. “Lots more to do: ending gun violence, combating climate change, access to healthcare. I’m all in!”

GOP Lawmakers Stand by Trump as Majority of Americans Oppose His Re-Election
Economist/YouGov survey shows strong disapproval, unfavorables

President Donald Trump points to his ears as he tries to hear shouted questions from reporters while departing the White House for Camp David on Sept. 8. (Win McNamee/Getty Images File Photo)

A new survey indicates a majority of Americans doubt President Donald Trump’s honesty, view him as a weak leader and don’t want him to run again. But Republican lawmakers say he isn’t a drag on their agenda and predict he will be a formidable candidate in 2020.

Fifty-six percent of respondents in the latest Economist/YouGov survey were so put off by the commander in chief they wanted him to opt against a re-election bid. The results were not kind to Trump, with 54 percent saying they either somewhat or strongly disapproved of how the president is doing his job, while 39 percent approved.

On Tax Overhaul, Public Support Hard to Find
Economist/YouGov survey shows opinions all over the place

From left, Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., Senate Finance Committee chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., participate in the Congressional GOP media availability to unveil the GOP tax reform plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Despite the enthusiasm for overhauling the tax code among Republican congressional leaders and President Donald Trump, the public is hardly sold on the idea that the effort is a priority or on its possible benefits. 

Nearly one-third of respondents to a new Economist/YouGov survey strongly opposed the GOP tax framework released last week, and nearly the same number believed their own taxes would stay the same under the plan.