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Ep. 36: Spooked by Russia
The Week Ahead

CQ Roll Call’s intelligence reporter Ryan Lucas separates fact from fiction on all the Russia-related reports that have thrown the nation’s capital into a tizzy. 

Ep. 36: Congress Set to Revoke Last-Minute Obama Regulations ... But There's a Risk
The Big Story

CQ Roll Call's Senate leadership reporter Niels Lesniewski walks us through how the GOP-controlled Congress can roll out the Congressional Review Act to rescind some of President Barack Obama’s last-minute regulations.

Show Notes:

Obamacare Tax on Wealthy Sparks Battle Over Fairness
Charges GOP favors a tax cut for the wealthy

Top Senate tax-writer Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, said lawmakers have not agreed on an effective date for repeal of the health law surtax. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

 Republicans and Democrats are squaring off in a fight over tax fairness as the GOP develops a timetable for repealing the 3.8 percent surtax on investment income under the health care overhaul.

GOP lawmakers have long argued for elimination of the surtax, or the net investment income tax, that applies to income such as interest, dividends and capital gains for individuals making more than $125,000 or couples earning more than $250,000.

Senate Democrats Plan Late-Night Obamacare Speeches
Schumer: Health care law repeal will unleash chaos in insurance market

Capitol workers move cots in the Senate basement on Monday morning. Senate Democrats say they’ll go late into the night to speak about Republican efforts to repeal the 2010 health care law. (Todd Ruger/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Democrats are planning to hold the Senate floor late into the night Monday to make speeches about the 2010 health care law as Republicans look to adopt a budget resolution this week, which would start the process for repealing the law.

“We cannot allow Republicans to make America sick again by repealing the ACA without a replacement plan that will ensure millions of Americans are not kicked off of their insurance, seniors do not face cuts to their Medicare, women are not denied access to care because of their gender, and many other groups, including Medicaid recipients, do not suffer,” Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer said in a statement, referring to the health care law.

Ep. 35: Steps to Repealing Obamacare and the Republican Stragglers ​
The Week Ahead

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CQ Roll Call's resident budget guru Paul Krawzak spells out the steps Republicans will take to achieve a repeal of Obamacare. The fast-track approach, however, is facing resistance within the GOP, says Health reporter Erin Mershon.

Ep. 34: GOP’s Ethics Debacle Could Keep Focus on Trump
The Week Ahead

House Republicans’ late night, closed-door effort to gut the Office of Congressional Ethics gave Democrats a winning messaging tool, says CQ Roll Call’s Money and Politics reporter Kate Ackley. The public relations debacle also could result in keeping the spotlight on President-elect Donald Trump’s perceived conflicts of interest, adds Editor Catalina Camia. Also, did you know that the ‘drain the swamp’ phrase popularized by Trump was first used by a leading Democrat?

Show Notes:

Ep. 35: Lawmakers Poised to Debate Immigration and Trump’s Wall
The Big Story

With Donald Trump in the White House, Republicans in Congress may finally have the momentum to change immigration policy that could spell trouble for more than 700,000 "Dreamers," children of undocumented immigrants who grew up in the U.S., say CQ Roll Call reporters Jonathan Miller and Dean DeChiaro.

Show Notes:

Ep. 33: Senate Hearing on Trump’s Pick for Justice Department Could Preview Supreme Court Battle
The Week Ahead

Even before President-elect Donald Trump is sworn in, the Senate will move forward with a hearing on Trump’s nomination of Alabama Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions to head the Justice Department, which has already inspired fierce opposition and support, say CQ Roll Call’s Legal Affairs writer Todd Ruger and Senior Political reporter Alex Roarty. Sessions’ hearing could also set the tone for Trump’s upcoming Supreme Court nomination.

Show Notes:

Too Many Trumps at the Table
An uncomfortable closeness to the trappings of a monarchy

The three older children of President-elect Donald Trump, from left, Donald Jr., Ivanka, and Eric, need to avoid involvement in government operations if Trump wants to protect both his future presidency and his business empires, Patricia Murphy writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Bill and Hillary Clinton moved into the White House in 1993, the newly installed first couple was nearly destroyed for making an offer they thought America could not refuse — a two-for-one special on Yale-trained lawyers interested in national public policy. Not only would Bill Clinton become the president, but Hillary Clinton would set up shop in the West Wing and go about the business of trying to overhaul the nation’s health care system. The arrangement wasn’t technically illegal, but it made many uncomfortable and played a big part in health care reform being declared DOA in Congress at the time.

More than 20 years later, President-elect Donald Trump has an even bigger, better deal for the American people. Instead of two for one, like the Clintons, how about five for one? That’s right, America, for a limited time only, you can will get Donald Trump, Donald Trump Jr., Eric Trump, Ivanka Trump and Ivanka’s husband, Jared Kushner, to run your government, all for the low, low price of Donald Trump. Just one of them was elected, and none of them have experience, but you’re going to love them once you try them. All of them.