podcasts

Ep. 42: Democrats, Finally, Select a Chairman
The Big Story

For four long months, Democrats have debated what to do to get out of the political wilderness. This weekend, the Democratic National Committee votes on who will be its next chairman, putting that person in a position to weigh in on the party's next move.

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Ep. 5: Why Trump’s New Budget Director Should Prepare for a Fight
Budget Tracker Extra

President Donald Trump finally has his budget director Mick Mulvaney in place, but with a daunting agenda it’s unclear how much he can get accomplished, says CQ Budget Tracker Editor David Lerman. Mulvaney faces, among other challenges, an April deadline when government funding expires and the unknown costs of Republican efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare.

Ep. 41: The New Liberal Tea Party and What it Can Learn From its Foes
The Week Ahead

Democrats and liberals hoping to build a movement against the policies of President Donald Trump should take a page out of the Tea Party's 2010 movement and focus on "policies that build power," says Vanessa Williamson, the co-author of the 2012 book The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism. Like the Tea Party in 2010, anti-Trump activists plan to storm lawmakers’ offices and town hall meetings during Congress’ President’s Day recess and Williamson explains what it means for politics and for governance on Capitol Hill.

The Donald vs. Very Fake News
The president’s solo news conference went exactly the way he wanted

President Donald Trump, seen here during his press conference Thursday, has the media right where he wants them, Wetherbee writes. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Donald Trump’s first solo press conference as president was a disaster. The 77-minute ramblings of an elderly man has both sides of the aisle worried. Reporters and pundits and supporters and the opposition are confused. What was that? 

It was what the president wanted.

Ep. 41: Town Hall Voter Anger May Force GOP to Stall Obamacare Repeal

As they head back into their states and districts next week, lawmakers could continue to face angry voters at town halls over repealing the Affordable Care Act, says CQ Roll Call’s political reporter Simone Pathé and health reporter Erin Mershon. This and fear of a backlash in the 2018 election, they explain, could further delay any action on the GOP’s six-year quest to repeal Obamacare.

Ep. 4: How Obamacare Could Lead Republicans to a Fiscal Train Wreck
Budget Tracker Extra

Various fiscal issues are piling up for Congress but remain unresolved, largely due to the GOP’s inability to agree on a roadmap to repealing Obamacare, says CQ Roll Call’s senior budget reporter Paul Krawzak. He explains how the Trump administration is approaching its first budget, but cautions that the end result might even be no budget at all.

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Ep. 40: The Public Education of Betsy DeVos
The Week Ahead

After a bruising Senate confirmation process, Betsy DeVos is now Education Department chief. But she still has a lot of distrust to overcome, says CQ Roll Call’s education reporter Emily Wilkins. Even so, she's poised to influence how Congress and America view one of the pillars of American life – public schools.

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Ep. 40: Elizabeth Warren’s War: Risk or Rebuke?

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell's selectively applied rebuke of Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren touched on volatile issues of race and gender, say, CQ Roll Call's Leadership editor Jason Dick and policy Editor Catalina Camia.

EP. 3: Earmark Debate Returns for House Republicans
Budget Tracker Extra

 

President Donald Trump’s pledge to drain the swamp hasn’t stopped some House Republicans from discussing bringing back earmarks, even as tea party lawmakers have called the practice pork-barrel spending. CQ Roll Call’s Budget editor Jane Norman and appropriations reporter Jennifer Shutt explain how the issue has gained enough traction to prompt House Speaker Paul D. Ryan to promise public hearings.

Don‘t Expect the Senate to Back Away From the Brink
Ending all filibusters seems inevitable, Gorsuch's confirmation the likely ‘nuclear’ spark

It may not be a question of if Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will use the “nuclear option” to break a legislative deadlock, but when, Hawkings writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Nuclear winter is coming. 

Perhaps it won’t arrive during this Supreme Court showdown. But then the odds will approach metaphysical certainty with the next vacancy on the court, unless deadlock on a premier piece of legislation happens first.