Pennsylvania

Highlights of Donald Trump’s Inauguration
Bushes arrive for 45th president’s swearing in

President Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts on the West Front of the Capitol on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The inauguration of President Donald Trump was full of both Trump bombast and the ceremonial pomp and circumstance that comes with the swearing in of a new commander in chief.

On one end, many worked to uphold the democratic traditions while Trump sought to drive home the points of his inauguration.

Good Trump, Bad Trump — Who Will Appear at the Inaugural?
No guarantee what president-elect will say Friday

Listening to President-elect Donald Trump’s past speeches gives one the sense of a political leader torn between a good angel on his right shoulder and a malevolent demon on his left, Walter Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

No matter how many drafts speechwriter Stephen Miller prepares, no matter how often the president-elect practices with a teleprompter, there is no guarantee what Donald Trump will say on Friday after he takes the oath of office. The man who is about to become the 45th president is too impulsive, too much of a creature of his own id, to be slavishly faithful to the final draft of the inaugural address. 

The majesty of the moment, the hand-on-the-Bible jolt of emotion for this child of Outer-Borough America, could send Trump in unexpected directions. Even an orator who revels in huge rallies, as Trump does, may be surprised — as Bill Clinton was in 1993 — at the way his oratory echoes off the monuments and how indistinct the faces of his audience appear as he gazes down from the heights of the West Front of the Capitol.

Counter Parties in D.C. Surrounding the Inauguration
What to do this week if you’re not fired up about Trump’s election

Capitol staffers cheered from balconies as hundreds of Washington, D.C.,-area high school students march to protest the election of Donald Trump in November. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As workers toil to return the National Mall and its surroundings to its pre-inaugural state, a crowd estimated in the hundreds of thousands is expected to gather on Saturday for the Women’s March on Washington.

And that’s not the only event around Washington this week for venting negative feelings toward the Trump presidency.

10 Quotes From the Last 10 Presidential Inaugurations
Every four years on Jan. 20, the country listens as the president looks toward the future

President Barack Obama waves to crowd after his speech at his second inauguration in 2013. (Scott Andrews/Pool/AP file photo)

It’s a ritual that’s been repeated many times over. On Friday, President-elect Donald Trump will take the oath of office and give his inaugural address. Here are some memorable quotes and photos from the last 10 times this was done.

1. Jan. 20, 1977: Jimmy Carter

Warmer Day? Get Ready for a Longer Inauguration
Inaugural addresses have generally run longer when it’s been warmer outside

Tiffanie Davis, 18, lays with her friends from Howard University while trying to stay warm during the wait for the 2009 inauguration. (Philip Andrews/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Attendees at presidential inaugurations can, generally, expect a speech fit for the weather.

Looking at midday temperature data for the past 52 years — stretching back to President Lyndon B. Johnson’s inaugural address after his election in 1964 — incoming presidents have tended to give shorter speeches when it’s colder outside.

Schedule of Inaugural Events
Official events planned for D.C. area for Thursday, Friday and Saturday

Joe Dick, of Providence, R.I., pushes a cart filled with flags along a side street filled with security barricades the day before the opening ceremony of President Barack Obama’s first inauguration in 2009. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Before and after the inaugural ceremony on Friday, there are a number of official events throughout Washington, D.C.

3:30-4 p.m. Wreath-Laying Ceremony — Arlington National Cemetery 

Confirmation Hearings Bring Out the Senate Angst
McConnell said to expect votes on Cabinet nominations Friday

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the Senate will return on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By BRIDGET BOWMAN and JASON DICKCQ Roll Call

The Senate eased into inauguration week with a pair of confirmation hearings, with committees taking up the cases for, or against, Montana Rep. Ryan Zinke to be Interior secretary and Betsy DeVos to be Education secretary.

Steve Israel Finds New Platform
Former DCCC chairman, former Sen. Rick Santorum to join CNN as contributors

Former Rep. Steve Israel, D-N.Y., talks with reporters in the Capitol Visitor Center after a meeting with House Democrats in June 2016. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former New York Democratic Rep. Steve Israel, an eight-term veteran of the House, is joining CNN as a contributor to its political coverage.

CNN anchor and media correspondent Brian Stelter tweeted Tuesday morning that the former chairman of the House Democratic Policy and Communications Committee and former chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee will join the network.

Court Nixes Key Spot on Parade Route for Anti-Trump Protest
Group holds permit for demonstration at Navy Memorial

An anti-Trump protest group lost its court battle for a key spot on Pennsylvania Avenue. (AFP/Getty Images File Photo)

Protesters won’t get to displace bleachers at a key inauguration parade spot on Pennsylvania Avenue so they can stage an anti-Donald Trump demonstration, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday. 

Act Now to Stop War and End Racism Coalition, known as ANSWER, had pressed a lawsuit seeking access to Freedom Plaza with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. A three-judge panel ruled that the government has the authority to restrict demonstrations in the public space located between 13th and 14th Streets on Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest.

Democrats, Donors Turn Focus to State Legislative Races
Republicans say their foes have tried before but still came up short

Former Attorney General Eric Holder’s National Democratic Redistricting Committee, which is backed by President Obama, will focus prominently on state legislative races. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Senate map is chock-full of deep red states, the House map skews Republican, and the presidential race doesn’t start for at least two more years. 

If Democrats and their donors want to find ways to win in 2018, they might need to refocus down the ballot — way down the ballot.