paul ryan

There’s Danger for Democrats, Too, in Obamacare Repeal
Blame for not replacing health care law may end up on everyone’s hands

Vice President-elect Mike Pence, center, and Reince Priebus, incoming White House chief of staff, leave a news conference with Republican senators after the Senate luncheons in the Capitol on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

“So the dog finally caught the car.” That seemed to be the consensus in Washington Wednesday after Vice President-elect Mike Pence and congressional Republicans declared with confidence that they will begin to repeal Obamacare immediately, but struggled to say what Americans could expect as a replacement for the president’s signature health care law, or when.

“It will literally begin on Day One,” Pence promised in a press conference about President-elect Donald Trump’s plans for dismantling Obamacare. But when asked what exactly will happen on Day One, or what the House will eventually vote on, Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan declined to go into detail.  

Boehner: ‘Thank God I’m Not in the Middle of This’
Former speaker compares president-elect to Teddy Roosevelt

Asked if he missed being involved more closely in this year’s election cycle, former House Speaker John A. Boehner replied, “Oh my God, no.” (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former House Speaker John A. Boehner weighed in on the incoming Trump administration Wednesday, calling the president-elect a “good guy” who wants to do “big things,” and advocating for bipartisanship in the new Congress.

Boehner told Cincinnati ABC affiliate WCPO that he and Trump have known each other for a long time. 

Members of Congress Pay Tribute to Gwen Ifill
Lawmakers from both parties remember the late ‘PBS NewsHour’ co-anchor

Veteran journalist Gwen Ifill has died of cancer at 61. (CQ/Roll Call file photo)

Members of Congress from both parties offered their condolences after the death of “PBS NewsHour” co-anchor Gwen Ifill. She was 61. 

Ifill, who also served as host of PBS’ “Washington Week,” died in Washington on Monday from complications of uterine cancer, The New York Times reported. She covered the White House, Congress and national campaigns for various media outlets for more than three decades. 

Today’s Lesson for America’s Children: Good Behavior Is for Losers
Democrats, the party of children and families, have to begin accounting for their failures

A stunned crowd at the Nevada Democrats' election night watch party watch as Donald Trump delivers his victory speech. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

“What are we going to tell the kids about this?”

For many Americans, the worst moment of election night wasn’t the 3 a.m. victory speech by Donald Trump. In the hours that followed, parents stole into the rooms where their children slept and counted the hours before the school day began on Wednesday, dreading the conversation to come.

Republicans Likely to Heed Trump's Call to Repeal Obamacare
Reconciliation could be used to strike parts of the law with 51 votes

The signature of Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., is seen after a signing ceremony last January for House legislation that would undo portions of the 2010 health care law.. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

 Congress is all but certain to seek to repeal parts of the health care overhaul, unwinding the signature achievement of the Obama administration and delivering on one of the Republican Party’s key campaign promises.

The health care law established state-based public health exchanges to encourage a competitive market for individuals who do not receive coverage through their job or another public program like Medicare. The fourth open enrollment period began last week for coverage that begins in January.

Trump, Hill GOP Must Get Along and Produce — Fast
An angry electorate demands results, uninterested in ideological infighting

Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, in July. He is now the president-elect of the United States. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

They broke it. Now they own it.

The Republican Party has won total control over the federal government for the first time in a decade. Two interconnected revolutions have brought the country to this juncture: The tea party movement that gave a new breed of confrontational conservative decisive sway on Capitol Hill starting six years ago, and now the extraordinary triumph of the infuriated outsider in the form of Donald J. Trump.

Election Impact: Rivlin Says Investment Needed to Boost Economy
Former CBO, OMB head sees common ground on infrastructure, tax reform, Social Security

Alice Rivlin, the onetime director of the Congressional Budget Office and former director of the Office of Management and Budget, said bipartisan agreement is necessary even without divided government. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

Hillary Clinton's email scandal and Donald Trump's unconventional presidential campaign has largely drowned out nuanced policy discussion about economic issues. Roll Call spoke with Alice Rivlin, the onetime director of the Congressional Budget Office, and the Office of Management and Budget under President Bill Clinton, about the need for both sides to compromise on debt and entitlements. Rivlin is a panelist at Roll Call’s Election Impact Conference on Nov. 10.

Roll Call: Democrats are talking more about the expansion of government programs, paid family leave, the minimum wage or expanding Social Security. What are your concerns about talk of expanding government with regard to the deficit? 

Congress and a Tax Overhaul: Lots of Talk, Little Action
Donald Trump's tax return controversy could prompt action — or not

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump gestures during the Presidential Debate at Hofstra University on September 26, 2016 in Hempstead, New York. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Is 2017 the year when a tax overhaul finally happens?

Don’t bet on it.

Ryan Announces Third-Quarter Fundraising Haul
But it doesn't match up with what Pelosi has raised for Democrats

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan has also transferred $31 million to the National Republican Congressional Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan announced Friday that he raised $15.4 million in the third quarter of 2016, tallying up $48.2 million for the year.

He also announced he had transferred more than $31 million to the National Republican Congressional Committee over his time as speaker.

For Trump, Getting Even Is More Important Than Getting Ahead
GOP nominee is a viper at the party's bosom

House Speaker Paul Ryan speaks at a May news conference following a meeting with Donald Trump. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

We’ve reached Day 85 of the hostage crisis known as the Donald Trump nomination. And he’s threatening to start shooting the captives.

The “hostages” are Republicans running for office this year. They now find themselves torn between two bad options: to abandon the top of their ticket or to embrace the nominee.