Paul D Ryan

Trump Hits Dems for Failing to Understand ‘Power of Lower Taxes’
President suggests Franken might have further sexually assaulted woman in 2006

President Donald Trump and Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., leave a meeting with the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on Thursday to discuss the GOP's tax reform bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Buoyed by a pair of Thursday incremental victories in his tax overhaul push, President Donald Trump is arguing separate House and Senate bills would be stronger if Democrats would play ball.

The president used several Thursday evening and Friday morning tweets to celebrate House passage of a GOP-crafted tax measure and a late-night Senate Finance Committee vote to send its version to the chamber floor.

Photos of the Week: Taxes Dominate, Bible Museum Opens and Trump Visits
The week of Nov. 13 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Virginia Rep. Scott Taylor sits on the House steps to shoot a selfie video about his vote on the tax overhaul Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Taxes once again dominated action on the Hill, with the Senate Finance Committee marking up its plan while the House passed its version of a tax overhaul by a 227-205 vote Thursday. 

Let Us Now Praise President Donald Trump
Republicans describe their rally with president

President Donald Trump makes a brief statement to the media as Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., left, and White House Chief of Staff John Kelly, right, look on, after a meeting with the House Republican Conference in the Capitol to discuss the GOP’s tax reform bill on November 16, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

“Unbelievably engaging.”Mark Meadows, N.C.

GOP Leaders Predict More ‘Yes’ Votes on Final Tax Bill
‘As long as you cross the finish line’

From left, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., arrive to speak to reporters following the House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol on Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders said they were not surprised by the comfortable nine-vote margin by which they passed their tax overhaul bill and predicted an even bigger spread on a final package reconciled with the Senate.

“I was not surprised by any of the ‘no’ votes or the ‘yes’ votes,” House Majority Whip Steve Scalise told Roll Call. “So it was a lot of work over the last week, but I was really proud of the conference and what they did for the country.”

Photos of the Day: Trump on the Hill Ahead of Tax Bill Passage
Thursday, Nov. 16, in photos

President Donald Trump and Speaker Paul D. Ryan leave a meeting with the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on Thursday to discuss the House GOP tax bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated at 2:10 p.m.| The House voted Thursday on a GOP plan to overhaul the U.S. tax code. The bill passed 227-205, with 13 Republicans voting against their party’s plan (here’s Roll Call’s full coverage of the vote).

Before the vote, President Donald Trump was at the Capitol to meet with the conference and discuss the bill. 

The GOP’s ‘Vote and Hope’ Caucus
Several House Republicans to vote ‘yes’ in hope of later changes

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, holding up a theoretical postcard tax form, and his leadership team appear to have the votes to pass their tax legislation. But several members say they hope substantial changes to the bill come later. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Many House Republicans planning to vote “yes” on their tax bill Thursday are doing so with the understanding the measure is far from perfect and hoping their concerns will be addressed later during House and Senate conference negotiations.

Sound familiar? It was the same strategy several members employed in voting for a bill in May to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.

Vulnerable Republicans in Political Catch-22 on Tax Overhaul
Democrats will attack them for the GOP tax plan even if they vote against it

New York Rep. Dan Donovan said the tax plan “kills the people who I represent.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s decision time on the ultimatum Republican leaders have been issuing to members all fall: Pass a tax overhaul or wave the House majority goodbye. 

But some of the party’s most vulnerable members, many from high-tax states in the Northeast, have come out against the House tax plan over its curtailing of deductions for state and local taxes and mortgage interest. Others are still undecided, afraid of how the measure will affect their districts. 

Senate Considers Staying in Session After Dec. 18
Discussions ongoing as chamber plate remains full

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., walks back to his office from the Senate floor in the Capitol on Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate is making preliminary plans to cancel a scheduled state work period the week of Dec. 18 in order to remain in session and wrap up a litany of outstanding items, according to three GOP senators.

The discussions on the schedule, which the lawmakers say are not yet final, is a testament to how much the chamber still has to accomplish before the year’s end and the looming political battle over several of the items.

Speier and Gillibrand Introduce Harassment Transparency Legislation
Bill would disclose involved offices and make members pay for settlements

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, right, and California Rep. Jackie Speier hold a news conference Wednesday to introduce legislation aimed at addressing and preventing sexual harassment for Capitol Hill staff. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A bipartisan group of lawmakers joined Rep. Jackie Speier to introduce new legislation that takes aim at sexual harassment in Congress.

“For all intents and purposes, a staffer in the Capitol is powerless and gagged,” Speier, a California Democrat, said Wednesday at the beginning of a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center. Harassers are often allowed to walk away to prey on others, she said.

Speier Says Congress Paid $15 Million for Harassment Settlements
Speier and Gillibrand to introduce legislation to deal with ‘an antiquated process’

Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif., said that she couldn’t name names, citing non-disclosure agreements. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Jackie Speier said Tuesday that the House of Representatives has paid out more than $15 million over the last decade to settle harassment cases, though that number also includes discrimination claims.

Speier made the assertion on “Meet the Press Daily” after testifying in Congress about sexual harassment on Capitol Hill.