Patrick T McHenry

Tillis OK After Collapse During Capital Challenge Race
Republican senator says he'll be back to work in the Senate

Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., in black shirt, and Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., in yellow shirt, run in the ACLI Capital Challenge 3 Mile Team Race in Anacostia Park on Wednesday. Tillis reportedly collapsed later. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated as of 10:12 a.m. on May 17

Sen. Thom Tillis said he was doing fine after he collapsed during Wednesday morning’s ACLI Capital Challenge road race.

GOP Leaders Say They're Done Tweaking Health Bill
Thursday or Friday vote is goal

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and his team see progress toward their position on the health care bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

BY LINDSEY MCPHERSON AND ERIN MERSHON

House GOP leaders suggested Wednesday afternoon that a forthcoming amendment for an additional $8 billion to reduce coverage costs for individuals with pre-existing conditions would be the final tweak needed to their health overhaul bill.

McCarthy: No Health Care Vote Friday or Saturday
‘We’ve been educating people on health care’

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., talks with a reporter before a procedural vote in the Capitol on the American Health Care Act, March 24, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By ERIN MERSHON and LINDSEY McPHERSON

Updated 11:00 p.m. 04/27/17

Analysis: Moderate Republicans Also to Blame for Health Care Impasse
Arguably more hard ‘no’ votes among moderates than conservatives

Tuesday Group Co-Chairman Charlie Dent is among the moderate Republicans unlikely to be convinced to vote for the GOP’s health care bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Conservatives in the House Freedom Caucus have shouldered the majority of the blame for the Republicans’ failure to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, but GOP moderates may be equally — if not more — responsible for the impasse. 

There are arguably more hard “no” votes (members not likely to be convinced to move to “yes”) for the GOP leadership’s plan among moderate Republicans than there are among Freedom Caucus members.

House GOP Leaders Tweak Health Care Proposal
Action before recess won’t make bill ready for a vote

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan has announced an amendment to the GOP’s health care bill that would create a high-risk pool for people with pre-existing conditions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders seeking to change the narrative on the health care talks announced plans to tweak their proposal on Thursday before members leave for a two-week recess, a move they touted as “progress.”

But they acknowledged it does not make the legislation ready for a vote.

House Running Out of Week on Health Care
Recess looms as sides make little headway on overhaul

Rep. Mark Meadows has been involved in talks on health care this week. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Recent talks among Republicans have given some members hope they are moving closer to their goal of repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law, but the reality is they are still well short of shoring up support as they head home for a two-week recess.

Several House Republicans on Tuesday believed a deal was so close that they could extend the current legislative week to vote on the bill. (The House is scheduled to adjourn for the recess Thursday afternoon).

Moderates Dismiss Heritage Action 'Cheap Shot'
Conservative group missive targeted Tuesday Group on health care

New York Republican Rep. Chris Collins said Heritage Action had little impact on the majority of the GOP conference. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Several House Republicans blew off an attack by Heritage Action Wednesday that blamed the moderate arm of the GOP for stalling negotiations to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.

The conservative group blasted members of the Tuesday Group for opposing talks “not based on policy, [but] because they don’t want to repeal Obamacare.” Heritage Action also suggested it might work to oppose those members running for re-election in 2018, but didn’t announce any ad buys.

Republicans Cancel Vote on Health Care Bill
Democrats chant ‘Vote, vote, vote’

Vice President Mike Pence and Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price leave their meeting with members of the House Freedom Caucus at the Capitol Hill Club. A failed final effort to secure the votes necessary to pass legislation repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Friday canceled a scheduled vote on the Republican bill to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, in what could be a catastrophic blow to the party’s seven-year campaign against the law.

Cheers could be heard from the House Democratic cloakroom as the news spread.

House Heads to Do or Die Vote on Health Care
White House threatens to walk if health bill fails

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, is interviewed in Rayburn Building after he and other members of the HFC met at the White House with President Trump, March 23, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Regardless of whether the votes are sewn up, the House will likely vote Friday on Republican leaders’ plan to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law — and President Donald Trump is willing to walk away from the effort if the measure fails in the chamber. 

In a closed-door meeting of the Republican conference attended by Trump’s senior aides, including Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, Senior Adviser Steve Bannon, Counselor Kellyanne Conaway and Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, the president’s aides delivered the message that they were done negotiating and the time was now to vote, win or lose.

Little Agreement Among GOP Members on Health Care Bill Next Steps
Regular conference meeting canceled ahead of Freedom Caucus meeting with Trump

House Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers said repeal of the so-called essential health benefits provision in the Republican health care plan, which Freedom Caucus members have pushed for, might not be allowed under Senate rules. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans had hoped to vote on a bill to partially repeal and replace the landmark 2010 health care law on Thursday, seven years to the day after President Barack Obama signed it. Instead, they find themselves without the votes to do so and little agreement on their next move.

The House GOP conference’s weekly Thursday planning meeting, at which lawmakers might have decided on next steps, was canceled Thursday morning. Members of the conservative Freedom Caucus, which opposed the bill, are scheduled to meet with President Donald Trump at 11:30 a.m., so progress on the bill may not be made until midday Thursday or later.