pacs

Trump Team Pushes Back on HHS Nominee‘s Stock Trading Issue
Rep. Tom Price is criticized for investments he made while working on health policy

Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., was nominated to be Secretary of the Health and Human Services Department. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team is disputing a recent report that raised questions about whether Rep. Tom Price, the nominee for Health and Human Services Secretary, violated insider trading laws while serving in Congress.

A Monday CNN report revealed that Price bought shares in Zimmer Biomet, a medical device company, in March. Price introduced a bill delaying a regulation that could have damaged the company less than a week after the purchase. CNN also reported that the company’s political action committee also donated to Price’s re-election campaign.

Senate Democrats Want More Time to Question Trump’s Education Nominee
Committee members limited to five minutes of questioning

Senate HELP Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., plans to hold one round of questions during Education Secretary nominee Betsy DeVos’ scheduled hearing. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats are seeking to extend the five minutes they will be allowed to question President-elect Donald Trump’s choice for Education secretary Betsy DeVos during her confirmation hearing next week, arguing her nomination raises a slew of issues that need more time to be examined.

While the confirmation hearings for some of Trump’s Cabinet picks have stretched for many hours, Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., said he would stick to the committee’s standard of holding one round of questions during DeVos’ scheduled hearing at 5 p.m. on Jan. 17. After opening statements by Alexander and ranking member Patty Murray of Washington, the 12 Republicans and 11 Democrats on the committee will be limited to five minutes of questioning, he said.

Maine Democrat to Trump: L.L. Bean Doesn't Need Your Help
Chellie Pingree sees no reason for liberals to boycott the retailer

Maine Democratic Rep. Chellie Pingree thinks there's "absolutely" no reason for liberals to boycott L.L. Bean because one of its board members donated to a PAC supporting Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Liberals should not be boycotting L.L. Bean just because a board member supported Donald Trump, Maine’s sole Democrat in Congress, Rep. Chellie Pingree of North Haven, said Friday.

“It’s a great company and those are American-made boots,” said Pingree, who can often be spotted strolling through the House with one of the Maine-based company’s canvas totes slung over her shoulder.

Is There Space for a Republican EMILY’s List?
Litmus tests might not work the same way on the right

Alabama’s Martha Roby is one of only 26 Republican women in Congress. Some party members wonder if they need their own version of EMILY’s List to increase that number. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As recently as the second Reagan administration, Republicans had more women in Congress than Democrats. Then EMILY’s List took hold.

The political action committee, founded in 1984, dedicated itself to electing Democratic women who support abortion rights, becoming an influential force in primaries even when it clashed with the wishes of party leaders. Now, of the 104 women in the 115th Congress, 75 percent are Democrats.

Self-funder Among GOP Members Asking Colleagues for Debt Help
Indiana’s Trey Hollingsworth is worth nearly $60 million

Indiana Rep.-elect Trey Hollingsworth is on a list of GOP members asking their colleagues for help with unpaid campaign expenses. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Indiana Rep.-elect Trey Hollingsworth loaned his campaign more than $3 million of his own money to get elected in the 9th District this year. But he’s now asking his new colleagues in the House to help with his unpaid campaign bills. 

Hollingsworth is one of ten members-elect on a list of candidates with campaign debt that the National Republican Congressional Committee distributed to the House GOP caucus. Two returning congressmen were on this year’s list, Carlos Curbelo of Florida and Will Hurd of Texas. Lawmakers can use their own campaign accounts or leadership PACs to help their indebted colleagues.

Take Five: Retiring Sen. Barbara Boxer
California Democrat is looking forward to ‘a more normal life’ but won't stop advocacy work

California Sen. Barbara Boxer displays photographs of all the male senators who held her seat before her above her desk in her Hart. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

California Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer, 76, is retiring this month after 34 years in Congress. She talked to HOH about advice for her successor, her marriage, and her plans off the Hill.

[Take Five: Retiring Rep. Charlie Rangel]

Boxer’s Advice for Dealing with Trump: Look at Me and Inhofe
‘You shouldn’t give up trying to find where there’s common ground’

Oklahoma Sen. James M. Inhofe and California Sen. Barbara Boxer had an odd-couple relationship on the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

A notoriously liberal, pain-in-Republicans’-neck, four-term senator, Barbara Boxer, has some advice for those she’s leaving behind as she ends her more than three-decade career on the Hill: Be honest with each other.

Oklahoma GOP Sen. James M. Inhofe, a reliable Republican hawk, and Boxer have had an odd-couple working relationship for the past decade, swapping the chairmanship of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, based on whose party controlled the Senate. 

Activists Brace for Fight Over Campaign Finance Law
Some GOP lawmakers have already introduced legislation that would remove the candidate-contribution caps

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, right, and Arizona Sen. John McCain at a Sept. 20 press conference on military aid to Israel. Cruz wants to reshape campaign finance law in the next Congress. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A newly empowered Republican Party has at least two years in Washington to overhaul everything from the tax code to border security.

Will it also make major changes to campaign finance law?

Donors to HHS Nominee Have Stakes in FDA, Medicare Decisions
Trump’s choice is a break from trend of presidents tapping governors and academics

Health and Human Services Secretary designee Tom Price would oversee issues including a major congressional overhaul of rules on how Medicare pays doctors. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Companies and trade groups that have donated to Rep. Tom Price’s campaign funds have major financial stakes in the decisions that he will oversee if confirmed as the next Health and Human Services secretary.

Among the contributors is a maker of placenta-based wound care products that’s in open conflict with a rival over Food and Drug Administration regulations. Based about a dozen miles from the Georgia Republican’s district office, MiMedx Group stands out among Price’s contributors for giving big money relative to its size.

Democratic PAC Transitions to Advocacy Role in 2017
End Citizens United taps into 2016’s frustration with establishment

End Citizens United helped elect New Hampshire Gov. Maggie Hassan to the Senate last month. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

2016 wasn’t the year Democrats wanted it to be.

But for one PAC created this cycle to elect Democrats at the federal level, this year’s election results may actually validate support for their mission: getting big money out of politics.