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Four Members Sued Over Rainbow Flags
Plaintiff says flag is religious symbol for the ‘homosexual denomination’

California Rep. Susan Davis posted a photo of the gay pride flag hanging outside her office alongside U.S. and California flags. (Courtesy Davis’ office)

Four Democratic lawmakers are being sued by an opponent of LGBTQ rights for displaying a gay pride flag in front of their offices.

The lawsuit is being brought by Chris Sevier, a lawyer opposed to same-sex marriage, The San Diego Union-Tribune reported.

Trump Stances Could Affect Cross-Border Energy Trade

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, arrives to chair the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing on near-term outlook for energy and commodity markets on Tuesday, jan. 19, 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When President Donald Trump signed an executive order in April to impose a tariff on Canadian softwood lumber, the administration and its supporters heralded the move as an equalizing measure meant to bolster domestic timber production.

For Trump, the tariff was the latest move meant to build on his “America First” campaign platform. The action his administration took amounted to a tariff in the form of an import tax totaling around 20 percent for softwood lumber imports from Canada. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross estimated the measure could result in $1 billion a year from Canadian lumber imports, which make up about one-third of the U.S. lumber market.

Word on the Hill: Learn How to Reduce Stress
Travel advice and play-in demonstration

On Tuesday, Washington commuters received a free banana from Amazon.com crew who were handing them out at Union Station to mark the online giant’s Prime Day. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With Senate staffers getting a shorter August recess this year, the Senate Wellness Fair might be coming at a good time.

There will be demonstrations on stress-reducing breathing techniques, as well as posture improvement and acupuncture from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today in the Senate Hart Office Building, Room 902.

Centrist Project Charts Path for Electing Independents
Alaska Governor, independent officials discuss how to win elections without parties

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker was among the Independent politicians who discussed a movement to elect nonpartisan candidates to Congress and statehouses at the National Press Club on Wednesday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

 

When Alaska Governor Bill Walker first ran for the state’s highest office in 2010, he faced a problem: many of his friends and supporters couldn’t vote for him in the closed Republican primary because they weren’t affiliated with the party.

Word on the Hill: More Paws in the Capitol
Game show night in Rayburn

Pennsylvania Rep. Lou Barletta poses at a photo booth with his dog Reilly during an ASPCA pet adoption event on Capitol Hill in 2014. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The annual “Paws for Celebration” pet adoption event on Capitol Hill is today, which means you can play with dogs and cats in the middle of the work day.

Hosted by the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, with the support of Reps. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., and Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., six local rescue groups will bring in animals in need of permanent homes.

Donald Trump Jr. Emails Detail Apparent Kremlin Offer of Help
White House: Obtaining negative information is what campaigns do

Donald Trump Jr. published what he said was the full email chain in the lead-up to his meeting with a Russian lawyer about Hillary Clinton during the 2016 campaign. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated 1:46 p.m. | A middleman told Donald Trump Jr. during the 2016 presidential election that a senior government official in Moscow wanted to share potentially damaging information about Hillary Clinton that the intermediary said was “part of Russia and its government’s support” for his father’s presidential campaign.

Trump Jr. on Tuesday tweeted what he said was the entire email exchange with a former Russian business partner of his father, President Donald Trump, that shows the son enthusiastically accepting the man’s offer to pass the alleged Kremlin-provided dirt on Clinton to the Trump campaign.

White House, Schumer Clash Over Confirmation Votes
Administration raises scepter of special session for nomination votes

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (left), D-N.Y., discusses Senate Republicans’ health care bill with Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., and Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., in the Capitol on June 22. On Monday, he fired back after the White House accused him of unjustly blocking its nominations. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The White House and Senate Democratic leaders clashed on Monday about what Trump administration officials are calling “unprecedented” blocking tactics of nominees from Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer — a charge the Senate Democratic leader scoffed at. 

Marc Short, White House legislative affairs director, accused Senate Democrats of “conducting the slowest confirmation process in American history” and Schumer of running “an unprecedented campaign of obstruction.”

Congress Unnerved by Energy Grid Hack

Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., has been concerned about the energy grid's vulnerabilities for some time, and has been warning the administration against budget cuts to cybersecurity agencies. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

For months, Sen. Maria Cantwell has been warning in letters to the Trump administration and colleagues that Congress needs to do more to keep the nation's energy supply safe from cyberattacks. Now it appears she has a widespread attack to bolster her admonitions.

Reports from Bloomberg and The New York Times last week indicated that Russian-backed hacking groups may be responsible for recent targeted cyberattacks to nuclear power plants and grid operation system manufacturers, threatening the electric grid and the economy it supports.

Congress Still Grappling With Cybersecurity Concerns
Experts say networks on Capitol Hill lag in basic protections

Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden, seen here at a 2015 #Hack4Congress event at Google’s offices in Washington, is one of several lawmakers who have pushed for improved security for congressional computer networks. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers and their staffs have been aware for years that their internet communications could be prime targets for both foreign and domestic spies.

But after last year’s hacking of the Democratic National Committee by Russian operatives, many are reassessing security protocols that once seemed sufficient — even overbearing — and finding them lacking.

Meet the Dogs of the Senate, Round II
Canine friends in Tillis, Wyden, Perdue, and Markey’s offices

Holland, a Pembroke Welsh corgi in Georgia Sen. David Perdue‘s office, keeps the senator’s couch warm. (Courtesy Perdue’s office)

A few friendly dogs roaming around can help make today’s tough political climate a bit easier to deal with.

In May, we featured some dogs who hang out regularly in Senate offices, either as official “office dogs,” or because they belong to staffers who like to bring them in.