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Opinion: And Now for Something Easy, Like Tax Reform
Legislation will need Democratic votes to succeed

UNITED STATES — Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin wants to get tax reform passed and signed by August. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Health care reform did not go well for the White House last week. OK, it blew up. But Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin is still bullish about getting tax reform passed and signed by August. 

“Health care and tax reform are two very different things,” he told Mike Allen of Axios last Friday, hours before the Obamacare vote was canceled amid GOP infighting. “Health care is a very complicated issue … in many ways, [tax reform] is a lot simpler. It really is.”

Paul Ryan Concedes on Health Care, Says House Will Move On
Speaker says members did all they could to get consensus

Speaker Paul Ryan said the House is moving on from the health care effort. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan Friday put a nail in the coffin, at least for the time being, on the GOP’s long goal of repealing the 2010 health law. 

Moments after the speaker and his leadership team pulled from the floor a bill to gut the law, Ryan faced the press and delivered a somber verdict for his troops. 

Members Show School Spirit as Sweet 16 Games Begin
Manchin, Cortez Masto go head-to-head while other members are torn

The Sweet 16 round of the NCAA March Madness starts today and members are showing their school spirit. And talking a little smack.

Sen. Joe Manchin III is the only member of Congress who is an alumnus of West Virginia University — he graduated with a business administration degree.

GOP Bill Takes Aim at Long-Shot Medicaid Expansion Hopes
Provision is a blow to efforts in North Carolina and Kansas

North Carolina Rep. Richard Hudson said the GOP provision was partially put in to benefit Republican governors who wanted to avoid political pressure to expand their own states’ entitlement programs. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans in North Carolina and Kansas who hope to scale back Medicaid can claim a victory in the updated GOP plan to overhaul the 2010 health care law. The package takes aim at those two states, which had the highest — albeit long-shot — hopes of expanding their Medicaid programs this year.

The provision, included in a manager’s amendment to the bill released by House leaders on Monday, would prevent states from expanding their Medicaid programs if they didn’t already do so by March 1.

Opinion: This Budget Isn’t Dead on Arrival
Trump’s budget draws the battle lines between the parties

A president’s budget sets the tone, direction and parameters of the debate over government operations and Republicans in Congress will be hard-pressed to go against a president of their own party, Allen writes. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Every year, Congress affixes the same toe tag to the White House budget within minutes of its delivery: “Dead on Arrival.”

The phrase is such a cliche, and so often repeated by members of Congress who dislike the president’s numbers, that it’s hard to find a news story about each year’s budget that doesn’t include those three words. It’s also discounted as just a “blueprint,” “a political document” or a “proposal” written for disposal. When I was a budget reporter for CQ, and at other publications, these were my watchwords.

Roll Call’s 2017 March Madness Bracket
Meehan, Villanova defending title

Every year, Roll Call matches members of Congress with the field in the NCAA men’s college basketball championship bracket.

What the GOP Wants to Keep or Gut from Obamacare
One Republican health plan is heading toward the House floor next week

GOP leaders, including pictured Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, Budget Committee Chairman Diane Black, R-Tenn., House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden, R-Ore., held a news conference Tuesday as the group continues to pitch a repeal and replace plan in the House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By RANDY LEONARD and ERIN MERSHON CQ Roll Call

A GOP proposal to repeal and replace portions of the 2010 health care law is making its way though the House, but it faces an uncertain fate.

GOP Grapples With Path Forward for Health Care Plan
Some senators are clamoring for changes to the House bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, center, says his chamber will consider whatever the House comes up with on health care. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans grappled Tuesday with how to advance their health care proposal following a report from the Congressional Budget Office that the plan would dramatically increase the number of uninsured Americans.

House lawmakers had more time to digest the report thanks to a winter storm that delayed their schedule. But senators trudged through the slush and snow to the Capitol, where they faced questions about the CBO report that said the GOP plan would lead to 24 million more people uninsured by 2026, and reduce the deficit by $337 billion over 10 years.

Photos of the Week: Health Care, Health Care and More Health Care
The week of March 6 on Capitol Hill as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., held a presser Thursday on the GOP plan to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, complete with a PowerPoint. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans started the week by rolling out their option to repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law on Monday evening. From there, several news conferences held by GOP leaders — and one headlined by Speaker Paul D. Ryan with series of charts — began the sale of the bill to House members. Some conservatives, however, are on not on board with the plan despite it passing two committees. 

Blumenauer Introduces No TRUMP Act
Would prevent taxpayer money from going to Trump hotels

Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore.,introduced a bill that prevent taxpayer money from being used for miscellaneous expenses at Trump hotels. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Earl Blumenauer took his latest swipe at President Donald Trump by introducing a bill with the new president’s name on it.

The Oregon Democrat’s No Taxpayer Revenue Used to Monetize the Presidency (NO TRUMP) Act would prohibit the use of taxpayer money to pay for events, overnight stays, food or any other miscellaneous expenses at hotels owned or operated by a president or family members, OregonLive reported.