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Opinion: Weighing the Costs of War and Diplomacy
Military action is not always the courageous choice

Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly could do more listening and learning, Mary C. Curtis writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

John F. Kelly is getting a lot of criticism these days, and that’s understandable. As leader of the Department of Homeland Security, the retired Marine general now has to be more sensitive to the politics of any given situation.

So when he publicly said critics of his agency’s policies — whether they come from Congress, civil rights groups or the public — should “shut up,” he came off as what he once was, a military man giving orders. When the administration, Kelly’s department in particular, is challenged on its travel bans and inconsistent immigration enforcement, Kelly could do more listening and learning.

Opinion: How Jon Ossoff Became the Face of the Anti-Trump Fight
Liberal blog Daily Kos led the way in resistance to president

Georgia Democrat Jon Ossoff’s rise to national prominence happened largely thanks to the efforts of the liberal blog Daily Kos, Patricia Murphy writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

In the days after Donald Trump was inaugurated in January, liberals in America were depressed, despondent, and asking themselves what to do next. David Nir, the political director of the liberal blog Daily Kos, had an answer and that answer was Jon Ossoff.

Nir and the Daily Kos team had been crunching the numbers from Trump’s election since the day after it happened. Which districts did Trump underperform in? Where were the opportunities for Democrats? They quickly noticed that in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District, which Mitt Romney won by 23 points in 2012, Trump had won by just a point and a half. Could Rep. Tom Price be vulnerable the next time around?

Opinion: Stifling Competition Reduces Access to Affordable Prescriptions
FAST Generics Act easy way to lower costs for patients and taxpayers

Martin Shkreli, former CEO Turing Pharmaceuticals, invoked his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on "methods and reasoning behind recent drug price increases," in February 2016. Turing had raised the price of a drug used by AIDS and cancer patients  from $13.50 to $750 a pill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

“We don’t want excessive profiteering. But the key word in profiteering is profit.”

When Martin Shkreli told Business Insider this in 2015 he might not have been trying to make a broad statement about perverse incentives in the regulatory status quo. But the statement did belie real problems that arise from a system far more complex than the heroes and villains of many popular media narratives.

All Eyes on Turnout in Georgia Special Election
Jon Ossoff thinks outright victory on Tuesday is ‘within reach’

Georgia Democrat Jon Ossoff speaks to campaign volunteers Monday before they head out to canvass the 6th District, one day before the special election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ROSWELL, Ga. — Morning rain showers with scattered afternoon thunderstorms. That’s the forecast for Election Day in the House district that’s set for one of the most closely watched special elections ever. 

In the final hours of the race to fill Georgia’s 6th District seat, only one thing mattered to the leading candidates: turnout. 

Opinion: Trump Must Resist His Inner MacArthur on Korea
A miscalculation could be very costly

A propaganda mural painting outside the People’s Palace of Culture in Pyongyang, North Korea. The country has bedeviled American policymakers for nearly seven decades, Shapiro writes. (Feng Li/Getty Images file photo)

Melissa McCarthy ended her latest impersonation of Sean Spicer — delivered in Easter garb on “Saturday Night Live” — by offhandedly mentioning, “And, by the way, the president's probably going to bomb North Korea tonight.”

Beyond the incongruity of a presidential press secretary announcing impending war while wearing a bunny suit, what made this moment funny was its small glimmer of plausibility.

Opinion: Why Congress Should Value, and Keep, AmeriCorps
The national service program efficiently lifts America’s most needy schoolchildren

Without AmeriCorps, roughly 14.5 million children currently living in families strained by poverty would fall further behind, Dale Erquiaga writes. (Courtesy AmeriCorps Facebook page)

When the new administration’s budget blueprint arrived last month, the math was, to say the least, unsettling. The EPA and State Department would see their budgets slashed by nearly one-third, Agriculture and Labor by 21 percent and the Education Department — which affects my area of work and interest — would take about a 13 percent hit.

The severe proposals sparked an intense and important national debate that continues today. Largely lost in the back and forth, however, has been the proposals affecting AmeriCorps, a program that since its inception has been a model for how to efficiently and effectively improve millions of lives. The Corporation for National and Community Service, or CNCS, which has administered AmeriCorps and other volunteer service programs for a quarter-century, has undoubtedly changed America for the better. But in the proposed budget, CNCS, and with it AmeriCorps, would be eliminated.

Opinion: House Members Should Take Civics Tests
… and avoid ‘let them eat cake’ moments

Oklahoma Rep. Markwayne Mullin recently told his constituents that the idea that he works for the voters of his district is “bullcrap.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Members of Congress should have to take a civics test. 

As you may have heard by now, Rep. Markwayne Mullin has a unique take on his relationship to his constituents. At a town hall meeting recently, the three-term Republican from Oklahoma, said the idea that he works for the voters of his district is “bullcrap.”

Analysis: Syria Dispute Allows Trump to Defriend Russia
President says relations are at an ‘all-time low’

After clashing with Russia over the Syrian government’s reported chemical gas attack, President Donald Trump and his team are taking a tougher tone toward Moscow. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump and his top diplomats continued pivoting away from Russia on Wednesday amid federal and congressional investigations into possible ties between his associates and the Kremlin. 

The new tone could be music to the ears of hawkish members of the president’s own political party.

Opinion: In North Carolina, the Good and Not-So-Good News
Compromise on ‘bathroom bill’ but an attempt to ban same-sex marriage

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper, left, is fighting a Republican supermajority in the state legislature that has sometimes seemed more intent on thwarting him than governing, Mary C. Curtis writes. (Courtesy Gov. Roy Cooper Facebook page)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — It’s North Carolina, so, of course, the good news is followed by that pesky dark cloud every time.

You would think everyone in the state would welcome the end of the long saga over House Bill 2, the so-called bathroom bill, which was repealed recently in a compromise. That bill, which had compelled people to use the bathroom that corresponded to the gender on their birth certificates, also said cities could not follow Charlotte’s lead and enact their own anti-discrimination ordinances or a minimum wage and much more.

Senator Plots Bill to Prevent a Repeat of United Airlines Episode
Van Hollen seeks support for ‘Customers Not Cargo’ Act

Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen says his draft bill aims to avoid a repeat of the United Airlines incident at Chicago O’Hare on Sunday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Chris Van Hollen is drafting legislation to make the forcible removal of passengers from commercial airlines illegal.

The Maryland Democrat circulated a “Dear Colleague” letter Wednesday, seeking co-sponsors for what he is billing as the “Customers Not Cargo Act.”