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Opinion: Trump Is Neck and Neck With the Worst Presidents
Could he even make Warren G. Harding look good?

Even Warren G. Harding had a better first month than President Donald Trump, Walter Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

DUBLIN — A long holiday weekend in Ireland proved to be less of an escape and more of a reminder of the omnipresence of the 45th president. The front page of the Sunday Independent featured a column by conservative writer and media personality Brendan O’Connor that began, “Ireland 2021. The country has been laid waste to after Donald Trump caused nuclear Armageddon.”

Trump Travel Ban Crashes Texas Wedding Plans
Texas native with Iranian roots presses lawmakers on executive order

Shervin Taheran is concerned that some of her relatives from Iran would be unable to attend her April wedding in Texas if President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration is reinstated. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump has repeatedly said his approach to preventing terrorist attacks on U.S. soil won’t always be tidy. That’s especially true when it affects things like the already delicate task of compiling a wedding guest list. Just ask Shervin Taheran. 

If reinstated by the judicial branch, Trump’s travel ban may prevent many family members and friends from entering the United States to celebrate personal milestones with their loved ones.

Poll: More Say Trump’s Immigration Order Increases National Security
But opinion divided whether the president's policy will keep the U.S. safe from terrorism

A new poll shows public opinion is divided over President Donald Trump's executive action on immigration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Most Americans think President Donald Trump’s travel ban order will make the U.S. more secure, although not everyone considers his policies will keep the U.S. safe from terrorism, a new poll shows.

Forty-three percent of those polled said they think Trump’s executive order imposing a ban on immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries will increase national security, 24 percent said it will cause a decrease, and 15 percent said it will have no effect. The remaining 18 percent said they weren’t sure, according to a Economist/YouGov poll released Wednesday.

Mia Love’s Rules for Constituent Meetings: No Recording, No Media
Constituents say she’s dodging town hall meetings

Utah Republican Rep. Mia Love  was criticized for having strict guidelines on meetings with constituents. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, is getting criticism from constituents over new rules she set for meeting with them.

At least three residents of her congressional district told KUTV in Salt Lake City on Tuesday that Love will only meet with them if they play by her rules.

Trump Hill Backers Provide Cover After Flynn Departure
Republicans say there's no reason to question president's judgement

Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., is interviewed by a television crew in the Cannon rotunda. He defended President Trump on Tuesday after his national security adviser resigned. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Some of President Donald Trump’s earliest and most vocal congressional supporters offered him political cover Tuesday, chalking up the first-month dismissal of his national security adviser as merely an inevitable early stumble.

GOP Rep. Chris Collins of New York, an early Trump supporter who was his transition team’s congressional liaison, was quick to protect the president’s flank after Michael Flynn resigned on Monday night. But few other Republican members flocked to television cameras on Trump’s behalf.

Trump Tries to Change the Subject on Flynn
'The real story here is why are there so many illegal leaks coming out of Washington?' president tweets

President Donald Trump had little to say about National Security Adviser Michael Flynn’s resignation, but plenty to say about the leaks that exposed him. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Normally a prolific morning tweeter, President Donald Trump was notably silent until mid-morning after the resignation of his national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Trump didn’t mention his former adviser by name, but instead commented on the situation surrounding Flynn’s departure and the leaks about the White House.

Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch Copies and Pastes
Responses from his appellate judge confirmation process reappear

In his response to a Senate Judiciary Committee questionnaire, Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch has listed his most significant cases, including a few that Democrats will point to as troubling signs about his judicial philosophy. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Judge Neil Gorsuch sailed through the Senate’s judicial confirmation process in 2006, and that already has helped him fill out key paperwork now that lawmakers are scrutinizing his legal career again as a Supreme Court nominee. 

Gorsuch, 49, has turned in a Senate Judiciary Committee questionnaire with some portions apparently copied and pasted from a similar questionnaire from a decade ago, when the Senate confirmed him on a voice vote to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit.

Hensarling’s Offensive on Dodd-Frank Seen as Negotiating Move
Texas Republican’s new bill strips much more of CFPB’s authority

Texas Rep. Jeb Hensarling was considered by President Donald Trump for the Treasury secretary position. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Financial Services Chairman Jeb Hensarling appears to be doubling down on his Dodd-Frank repeal legislation, adding more features objectionable to Democrats in the wake of a White House announcement of a four-month review of the nation’s financial laws and regulations. 

In a staff memo circulated last week, Hensarling filled five single-spaced pages with changes to a bill approved by his committee in September 2016 over the opposition of every Democrat and one Republican. Among other things, the Texas Republican’s new bill would strip much more of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s authority than last year’s version.

Different Era of Refugees Takes Stage in Washington
Arena Stage’s ‘Watch on the Rhine’ is a profound reflection of modern times

From left, Lise Bruneau as Sara Muller, Lucy Breedlove as her daughter Babette, and Andrew Long as Kurt Muller arrive in the Washington suburbs from Germany, eager for good meals and living conditions, in the Arena Stage production of “Watch on the Rhine”. (C. Stanley Photography)

The immigration debate from another era couldn’t escape parallels with the current one during a special performance of “Watch on the Rhine” on Thursday night at Arena Stage.

The play takes place while America is on the brink of World War II and Fanny Farrelly, a wealthy woman played by four-time Academy Award nominee and Golden Globe winner Marsha Mason, and her lawyer son, David Farrelly, take two refugee families into their home just outside Washington, D.C.

House to Take First Step to Overturn D.C. Assisted Suicide Law
Local groups plan to protest latest salvo against home rule

House Oversight Chairman Jason Chaffetz has taken an aggressive stance on reviewing D.C. laws and budgets. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A House committee will take the first official step Monday evening to overturn a new Washington, D.C., assisted suicide law, raising concerns locally that a Republican-controlled Congress will be emboldened to interfere with city government under President Donald Trump.

Actually overturning the so-called Death With Dignity Act would require an improbable series of events. After the vote on the disapproval resolution at the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, the measure would have to pass floor votes in both the House and the Senate president before Feb. 17. That’s according to a timeline set out by the city’s Home Rule Act.