Ohio

Freedom Caucus steps into the GOP messaging gap
Conservative hard-liners fill vacuum to counterpunch for Trump

From right, Reps. Mark Meadows, Matt Gaetz, Jim Jordan and Scott Perry are among the president‘s top defenders in the House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Mark Meadows’ gaze was scrupulously trained on Adam B. Schiff.

On Oct. 3, after deposing a former Trump official for hours, Schiff, the House Intelligence chairman, emerged from a secure room in the Capitol’s basement and addressed a waiting television camera.

Lowey retirement sparks Democratic Appropriations scramble
Contested battle expected for top spot on powerful House spending panel

New York Rep. Nita M. Lowey announced her retirement last week at the end of the 116th Congress. Who will replace her as the top Democrat on House Appropriations? (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Appropriations Chairwoman Nita M. Lowey’s decision to retire at the end of the 116th Congress will set off a lengthy and contentious campaign among her colleagues to determine who will become the top Democrat on the spending panel.

Unlike the Senate, which predominantly relies on seniority to determine who serves as a chairman or ranking member, the House weighs several factors before deciding who will lead a committee. And right now, assuming Democrats keep their House majority next year, signs may be pointing in the direction of Connecticut Rep. Rosa DeLauro, who will be the third-ranking Democrat on the powerful committee in 2021. 

Photos of the Week: Not really recess week
The week of Oct. 11 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

Alison Malone, right, and Marco Ruiz dance while waiting in line to enter the Supreme Court on first day of the new session of the court on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Appropriations Chairwoman Nita Lowey announces retirement
New York Democrat has served in the House for three decades

New York Rep. Nita M. Lowey, chairwoman of the House Appropriations Committee, is retiring after 16 terms. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Appropriations Chairwoman Nita M. Lowey announced Thursday that she is not running for reelection. The New York Democrat was the first woman to lead the powerful committee.

“After 31 years in the United States Congress, representing the people of Westchester, Rockland, Queens and the Bronx, I have decided not to seek re-election in 2020,” Lowey said in a statement. “It is my deep honor and privilege to serve my community and my country, and I will always be grateful to the people who have entrusted me to represent them.”

When celebrity luster gives cover to how America judges its own
Jessye Norman and Diahann Carroll remind us of the unfair burden placed on icons of color

People who hold up the late Jessye Norman, left, or Diahann Carroll as exemplifying America’s promise, that hard work will inevitably lead to reward, ignore the women’s own struggles , Curtis writes. (Gregg DeGuire/WireImage/Getty Images file photos)

OPINION — I am not one of those folks who see celebrities as larger-than-life icons to be worshipped and admired. Usually. But the recent deaths of Jessye Norman and Diahann Carroll hit me in the gut because those two amazing women were at once larger than life and so very real. The reactions to their accomplishments also illustrate an American or perhaps universal trait — the ability to compartmentalize, to place certain citizens of color or underrepresented citizens on a pedestal, at once a part of and apart from others of their race or gender or religion or orientation.

It allows negative judgment of entire groups to exist alongside denials of any racist or discriminatory intent. There are a lot of problems with that way of thinking. It places an unfair burden on the icons, a need to be less a human being than a flawless symbol. And it uses them as a rebuke to others who never managed to overcome society’s obstacles.

Sondland is a no-show at Intel hearing, Schiff and Jordan respond

Reps. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, and Adam Schiff, D-Calif., speaks with the media after Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, was blocked from appearing for a closed-door deposition in the in the Capitol Visitor Center on Tuesday (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats, Trump lock in on impeachment standoff

House Intelligence Chairman Rep. Adam B. Schiff, D-Calif., speaks to reporters in the Capitol after learning the State Department had blocked Ambassador Gordon Sondland from testifying to the committee on Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff on Tuesday bemoaned the State Department’s decision to block U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland from testifying before the committee during its impeachment inquiry, calling the decision “obstruction”.

Sondland’s testimony, the California Democrat said, would have been “deeply relevant” to the inquiry into whether President Donald Trump used his office to coerce the Ukrainian government into investigating a chief political rival ahead of his 2020 re-election bid.

Bernie Sanders had a heart attack, his doctors confirm
2020 White House hopeful released from hospital after surgery

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders had a heart attack earlier this week, his campaign confirmed Friday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders had a heart attack earlier this week, his campaign said Friday after he was released from a hospital in Las Vegas.

The 2020 White House hopeful was admitted to Desert Springs Hospital Medical Center on Wednesday after experiencing chest discomfort following a campaign event the previous night. On Friday, his campaign released a statement saying he “feels great” and looks “forward to getting back to work.”

How a Trump whistleblower claim spun (out of control)
Trump’s suggestion that whistleblowers should or must only disclose what they directly witness is incorrect, experts say

President Donald Trump walks out of the White House to answer questions, including about a whistleblower at the center of the impeachment inquiry, while departing the White House on October 03, 2019 in Washington. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS | President Donald Trump and his supporters have sought to undermine a whistleblower at the center of the impeachment inquiry in many ways, not least by saying the person had no firsthand knowledge of the alleged wrongdoing.

But the president’s argument is off base. And how it came to be part of the public debate illustrates how a reasonable-sounding talking point can be completely inaccurate. It also shows how, in the Trump era, facts are not only misstated or distorted but can harden after much retelling into fantastically conspiratorial tales that are believed in the nether regions of cyberspace.

GOP laments Schiff’s handling of Ukraine probe, Volker testimony
Schiff: Trump actions ‘ought to be condemned by every member’

Kurt Volker, former U.S. special envoy to Ukraine, arrives at the Capitol Visitor Center to be deposed by House committees as part of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans on Thursday said that testimony from the State Department’s former envoy to Ukraine, sought by House Democrats with regards to their impeachment inquiry, won’t advance the drive to impeach President Donald Trump.

Emerging from the day-long deposition, New York Republican Lee Zeldin said that former U.S. Envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker’s private Thursday testimony, “blows a hole in the argument” presented by Democrats that  Trump asked the president of Ukraine for a quid pro quo.