Ohio

Lawmakers React to Latest Trump-Russia Bombshell: ‘What Now?!’
Report: President asked two top intel officials to deny collusion with Moscow

President Donald Trump speaks during a joint statment with Israel's President Reuven Rivlin at the President's House on May 22, 2017 in Jerusalem, Israel. (Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images)

BY JOHN T. BENNETT, LINDSEY McPHERSON AND REMA RAHMAN

Lawmakers on Monday evening seemed resigned to yet another bombshell report suggesting President Donald Trump attempted to interfere with a federal investigation aimed at, in part, determining whether there was collusion between his campaign and the Russia government.

Congressional Day Care Wait List Up to ‘Several’ Years
266 children waiting for the call

Staffers pay anywhere from around $1,000 to $1,400 a month for child care on the Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

By ALEX GANGITANO and KATHERINE TULLY-MCMANUS

If you’re a House staffer and thinking about having a baby in three years, you probably should get on the congressional day care wait list now.

How the Koch Network Could Sink Tax Overhaul
Lobbying network poised for policy win

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 04: Americans for Prosperity Foundation chairman and Koch Industries Executive Vice President David H. Koch (C) listens to speakers during the Defending the American Dream Summit at the Washington Convention Center November 4, 2011 in Washington, DC. The conservative political summit is organized by Americans for Prosperity, which was founded with the support of Koch and his brother David H. Koch. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The lobbying and political network of Charles and David Koch, bogeymen to Democrats for years, is poised for a significant policy win — but it will come at the expense of fellow conservatives on Capitol Hill.

Their victory also could derail a policy goal they share with those same Republican lawmakers: a permanent comprehensive overhaul of the nation’s tax code.

Photos of the Week: Lawmakers Reel and Run
The Week of May 15 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Arizona Sen. John McCain talks with reporters on Wednesday after a vote in the Capitol about whether a special prosecutor is needed to investigate President Donald Trump’s alleged ties to Russia. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BY BILL CLARK AND TOM WILLIAMS

The House returned Tuesday after a one-week recess to a Washington reeling from new allegations related to the firing of FBI Director James B. Comey and revelations that the president shared classified information with Russian officials in the Oval Office. 

Gowdy Gunning for Oversight Chairman
South Carolina Republican would succeed Chaffetz

South Carolina Republican Rep. Trey Gowdy led the select committee that investigated a terrorist attack in Benghazi while Hillary Clinton served as Secretary of State. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A spokeswoman for Rep. Trey Gowdy said Thursday he is exploring a bid for chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee once its current gavel-holder leaves Congress next month.

“It is fair to say he is considering it,” the spokeswoman said.“Rep. Gowdy is talking to members in the conference about the qualities they believe are most important for the next chairman to possess.”

Controversial Sheriff Says He’s Taking Homeland Security Post
‘It’s going to be a huge learning curve for me’

Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke appears on stage of the Quicken Loans Arena after speaking on first day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, July 18, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke, who has been a staunch supporter of President Donald Trump, said Wednesday he’s taking a job at the Homeland Security Department.

Clarke, whose name has been previously floated for administration jobs, told WISN-AM that he’s taking a job at DHS that involves liaising with state and local law enforcement agencies. The post does not require Senate confirmation.

NRCC Raises $10 Million for Fourth Straight Month
House GOP campaign arm posts best April haul in history

Ohio Rep. Steve Stivers presides over the NRCC, which has raised $46 million in the first four months of the year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The National Republican Congressional Committee raised more than $10 million in April, marking the fourth month in a row that the group raised that much money — its longest streak in history.

While President Donald Trump’s White House continues to cause headaches for congressional Republicans, his presidency has been a boon for the House GOP’s campaign arm. 

Lawmakers’ Safety Exemption for Old Steamboat Alarms Coast Guard
Fire risk to passengers high, according to document

A bill exempting the Delta Queen steamboat from a fire safety law has come under strong criticism. (Doug Strickland/Chattanooga Times Free Press/AP file photo)

The Senate voted overwhelmingly last month to permit a 90-year-old stern-wheel steamboat named the Delta Queen to travel the Mississippi River as an overnight cruise ship for up to 174 passengers.

Relaunching the now-idle boat would rekindle a connection to the region’s history and inject millions of tourist dollars and hundreds of jobs into states up and down the river, supporters of the measure said.

Senators Push Back on Trump Drug Abuse Actions
Republicans pledge to fight funding cuts, shifts in criminal enforcement policy

West Virginia Sen. Shelley Moore Capito says she will push back against efforts to cut funds to the Office of National Drug Control Policy. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump pledged to tackle prescription drug abuse and the flow of illegal drugs into the country. But his White House efforts are off to a rocky start so far.

Earlier this year, Trump appointed New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie to lead a opioid crisis task force. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, along with other administration officials including Attorney General Jeff Sessions, have embarked on a listening tour of areas ravaged by the opioid epidemic.

White House Won't Deny Trump is Taping Oval Office Conversations
President has ‘nothing to add’ to tweet threatening Comey with ‘tapes’

President Donald Trump is seen through a window speaking on the phone with King of Saudi Arabia, Salman bin Abd al-Aziz Al Saud, in the Oval Office on Jan. 29. His top spokesman on Friday did not deny that Trump might be recording his Oval Office conversations. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

The White House on Friday declined to deny that President Donald Trump is recording conversations he is having in the Oval Office.

Press Secretary Sean Spicer began his back-and-forth with reporters Friday by saying Trump told him he has “nothing to add” to a morning tweet in which he suggested he has “tapes” of private conversations with James Comey, the former FBI director whom he fired on Tuesday. The president threatened to release them should Comey talk to the media.