North Carolina

Chaos Consumes Future of Obamacare Repeal Effort
Senate Republicans have “assurances” the House would go to conference with the chamber

Ohio Sen. Rob Portman said Thursday he would support a slimmed-down bill to repeal the 2010 health care law in order to get to a conference with the House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By JOE WILLIAMS, REMA RAHMAN and LINDSEY McPHERSON

Senate Republicans are hinging their support on a “skinny” bill to repeal the 2010 health care law on assurances that the chamber would go to conference with the House on a broader bill with replacement measures.

Opinion: ‘Values’ Are Relative When Rooting for Your Political Team
Demonization is easier than appreciating the virtues of opponents

President Donald Trump waves as he walks to Marine One while departing from the White House to Beaver, West Virginia, on Monday to address the Boy Scouts’ 2017 jamboree. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

In his wary optimism after the U.S. Senate voted to proceed with debate on dismantling President Barack Obama’s signature Affordable Care Act and replacing it with, well, something, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said he and his supporters were “not out here to spike the football.”

In this case, the cliched sports metaphor fit.

House Defeats Amendment to Cut One-Third of CBO Staff
‘It was CBO’s reluctance to change their erroneous forecasts’

Rep. Morgan Griffith, R-Va., offered the amendment that would have gotten rid of an 89-person CBO budget analysis division. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Wednesday night rejected, 116-309, an amendment that would have eliminated one-third of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

The amendment, offered by Virginia Republican Morgan Griffith to the four-bill appropriations minibus the House is currently debating, would have abolished CBO’s 89-employee budget analysis division and saved a total of $15 million in salaries. Roughly half of Republicans joined Democrats in voting down the amendment.

How the Courts Could Upend Gerrymandering
Democrats and voter rights groups pin hopes on high court case

A new, mathematical approach to proving partisan gerrymandering will be tested at the Supreme Court this fall in a case about Wisconsin’s state Assembly district lines. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

By RANDY LEONARD and TODD RUGER

Congressional maps in key battleground states such as Pennsylvania have shifted the political balance of Congress toward Republicans — but that could soon change.

House to Vote on CBO Staff Cuts
Appropriations amendment would eliminate budget analysis division

Virginia Rep. Morgan Griffith, who led the effort to reintroduce the Holman rule, took the first crack at using it by offering an amendment to cut Congressional Budget Office staff. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House this week will vote on whether to eliminate the positions of 89 Congressional Budget Office employees in what will be its first vote under the so-called Holman rule that Republicans in the chamber reinstated on a trial basis earlier this year.

The Holman rule allows members to offer amendments to appropriations bills designed to reduce the scope and size of government.

Democratic House Freshmen Show Fundraising Edge Over GOP Classmates
First-term Democrats outraise Republicans in first and second quarters

Rep. Josh Gottheimer, D-N.J., in his office in the Cannon House Office Building in February, was the top fundraiser for House freshman in the first two quarters of 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Corrected at 5:28 p.m. on July 24 | Republicans may hold the House majority, but that doesn’t give them every advantage.

With their first two fundraising deadlines behind them, Democratic newbies in the chamber are demonstrating their ability to out fundraise their Republican colleagues.

Perdue’s Fellows Connect Congress to the Corps
Maj. Simba Chigwida is a national defense fellow this year

Georgia Sen. David Perdue poses with Maj. Jim Purekal, left, and Maj. Simba Chigwida in front of the Marine Corps War Memorial. (Courtesy Perdue’s office)

Georgia Sen. David Perdue’s office has had the unique opportunity of having two active-duty Marine Corps officers working there.

The Marine Corps affords some Marines the opportunity to apply for congressional fellowship positions and, if accepted, assigns them to a House or Senate office. Of the roughly 100 Marine fellows currently on the Hill, Perdue’s office has been assigned two back-to-back, which is pretty rare.

Podcast: On Russia, Congress Looks at the Collusion Question
The Week Ahead, Episode 63

Capitol Hill will likely hear from three key figures in the Russia investigation this week, Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, his son, Donald Trump Jr., and his former campaign manager, Paul Manafort. CQ Legal Affairs Reporter Todd Ruger previews what figure to be blockbuster hearings.

Photos of the Week: A Health Care Bill Stalemate Hits D.C. Amid Heat Wave
The week of July 17 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

On Monday, U.S. Capitol Police officers prepare to arrest several demonstrators protesting the GOP health care legislation in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building. Dozens of protesters chanted during the demonstration before police cleared the atrium. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By BILL CLARK and TOM WILLIAMS

The week of July 17 began with health care negotiations in the Senate, amid protests in the hallways of the Senate office buildings, and is coming to an end with an essentially stalled process on a new health care bill in the chamber. The Republican effort to repeal and replace President Barack Obama’s signature law continued to be the focus of Congress watchers on the Hill this week.

Conservatives Plot Payback for Obamacare Repeal Failure
Outside groups warn that Republicans could lose control of Congress

A man holds a sign during an anti-health care overhaul rally in 2010. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

With the effort to repeal the 2010 health care law on the brink of failure, conservatives are warning that the Republican base will abandon the party. And some are already turning on GOP senators holding up the process.

Three GOP senators have said they would not support moving forward with an effort to repeal much of President Barack Obama’s signature health care law, which would be enough to block the effort. Conservatives, livid with lawmakers reneging on a seven-year promise to undo the law, say not fulfilling that pledge threatens the GOP majorities in Congress.