new hampshire

Senators Look to Supreme Court Nuclear Winter
With rule change seemingly inevitable, senators look to what’s next

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Judge Neil Gorsuch will be confirmed to the Supreme Court, one way or another. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate Republicans’ deployment of the “nuclear option” to change the chamber’s rules and confirm President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee is so inevitable that senators are already moving on to the next debate.

“We’re on this spiral downward, and obviously, the next thing to go likely the next time there’s a big issue that comes up legislatively will be the legislative filibuster,” Sen. Bob Corker said Tuesday.

Even With Snow, Health Care Rallies Press On
Democrats and Republicans expected at two events on Capitol Hill

Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who has railed against a GOP-backed bill that would repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, will join a rally Tuesday touting the current law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Members of Congress are expected to join dueling rallies in Washington this week organized by advocacy groups on opposite ends of the health care debate despite the threat of a late-winter snow storm prompting cancellations on Capitol Hill.

Democrats, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer and Sen. Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire are scheduled to join the Save My Care event on Tuesday morning during what is projected to be peak hours of the storm.

Opinion: How to Fix the Debt Once and for All

President Ronald Reagan warned of the dangers of rising national debt, former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell and former New Hampshire Sen. Judd Gregg write. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

By ED RENDELL and JUDD GREGG

President Ronald Reagan warned of the dangers of debt when it rose past $1 trillion for the first time just 34 years ago.  Soon, the national debt will break the $20 trillion mark.

Franken Returns Donations from Controversial Law Firm
Thorton Law Firm is being investigated for possible campaign finance violations

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., received about $41,000 in contributions from Boston law firm being investigated. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., returned $40,822 donated to him from a Boston law firm currently being investigated for potentially illegal campaign contributions.

An investigation into the Boston-based Thorton Law Firm by The Boston Globe and the Center for Responsive Politics revealed that Thorton essentially reimbursed employees for political contributions through bonus checks that totaled the exact amount of the donation.

Hints of a ‘Shop-’Til-You-Drop’ Presidency
Trump delivers first major deficits-don’t-matter speech in modern GOP history

President Donald Trump greets Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday following his joint session address, which strikingly omitted a full-throated sermon on the dangers of increased national debt, Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It was the most perplexing speech of Donald Trump’s career. 

Watching the 45th president deliver an address to Congress mercifully free of vitriolic attacks and short on egocentric nonsense prompted the obvious question: In what storeroom at Mar-a-Lago have they been hiding this version of Donald Trump?

Bipartisan Group Pushes Opioid Help Amid Obamacare Debate
Lawmakers concerned over potential effects of GOP health care overhaul

New Hampshire Rep. Ann McLane Kuster says the opioid epidemic has come as a surprise to many of her colleagues. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bipartisan group of House lawmakers is fighting to keep attention focused on last session’s top health issue — abuse of prescription opioids, heroin and other drugs —  although the 2010 health care law now dominates the health policy discourse.

The group hopes to pressure Congress to provide financial support to states for prevention and treatment, even as Republicans pursue an overhaul of the Medicaid system that could make it harder for states to pay for those services.

Guest List: Who Members of Congress Are Taking to Trump’s Address
President to make first speech to joint session of Congress on Tuesday

The guest lists are out for President Donald Trump’s first address to a joint session of Congress. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump will hold his first joint session address to Congress on Tuesday and every member is able to bring a guest to sit in the gallery.

Oftentimes, those invited are a part of what is driving the news of the day.

Word on the Hill: Busy Week
Your social calendar for the week

President Donald Trump is coming to the Capitol this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Pool)

Welcome back from recess! We’re hitting the ground running for another busy week on the Hill.

President Donald Trump’s address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday at 9 p.m. will drive the week — make sure you plan for that.

A New DNC Chair: This Time It Really Counts
Democrats have much to overcome

The choice of a permanent successor to Debbie Wasserman Schultz as Democratic National Committee chairman has taken on larger-than-usual significance, Walter Shapiro writes. (Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

BALTIMORE — Watching the Democratic Party’s regional forum here last week, my mind kept flashing back to that nearly century-old Will Rogers crack, “I am not a member of any organized party — I am a Democrat.”

In normal times, the selection of a Democratic chair is one of those topics that primarily interest political reporters in the postelection doldrums and consultants hoping for future contracts. But with the Democrats in their worst shape organizationally since the 1920s, the choice of a permanent successor to Debbie Wasserman Schultz takes on larger-than-usual significance.

At DGA, Pearson Quietly Pulling Democrats Back to Prominence
Executive Director is a leading strategist in party’s redistricting effort

Elisabeth Pearson, Executive Director, Democratic Governors Association (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic lawmakers probably wouldn’t recognize Elisabeth Pearson if she walked into their Capitol Hill office, but they might be owing her their jobs before too long. 

As executive director of the Democratic Governors Association and a leading strategist in the party’s redistricting efforts, Pearson’s success will determine how long members stay in Washington.