new hampshire

A New DNC Chair: This Time It Really Counts
Democrats have much to overcome

The choice of a permanent successor to Debbie Wasserman Schultz as Democratic National Committee chairman has taken on larger-than-usual significance, Walter Shapiro writes. (Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

BALTIMORE — Watching the Democratic Party’s regional forum here last week, my mind kept flashing back to that nearly century-old Will Rogers crack, “I am not a member of any organized party — I am a Democrat.”

In normal times, the selection of a Democratic chair is one of those topics that primarily interest political reporters in the postelection doldrums and consultants hoping for future contracts. But with the Democrats in their worst shape organizationally since the 1920s, the choice of a permanent successor to Debbie Wasserman Schultz takes on larger-than-usual significance.

At DGA, Pearson Quietly Pulling Democrats Back to Prominence
Executive Director is a leading strategist in party’s redistricting effort

Elisabeth Pearson, Executive Director, Democratic Governors Association (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic lawmakers probably wouldn’t recognize Elisabeth Pearson if she walked into their Capitol Hill office, but they might be owing her their jobs before too long. 

As executive director of the Democratic Governors Association and a leading strategist in the party’s redistricting efforts, Pearson’s success will determine how long members stay in Washington.

Photos of the Week: Pence Casts Historic Vote, Gorsuch to the Hill and Warren Reads King
The week of Feb. 6 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Protesters gather in Upper Senate Park at the Capitol on Monday to call on senators to reject Secretary of Education nominee Betsy DeVos. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By BILL CLARK and TOM WILLIAMS CQ Roll Call

A busy week in the Capitol was marked by several historic moments, including the first time a vice president has cast a tiebreaker vote on a cabinet nomination. The Senate, in protest of several of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees, was in session for more than two days. The late night session made headlines when Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren was silenced as she read a 1986 letter from Coretta Scott King about Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

DCCC Announces 2018 Leadership Team
Expanded team includes returning members and some fresh faces

Washington Rep. Denny Heck will return as DCCC recruitment chairman for the 2018 cycle. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chairman Ben Ray Luján announced his leadership team for the 2018 cycle on Thursday.

The 20-person team, shared first with Roll Call, is an expanded group from previous cycles. 

Take Five: Maggie Hassan
New Hampshire Democrat took up crossword puzzles while campaigning

New Hampshire Sen. Maggie Hassan previously served two terms as governor was governor. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Freshman Democratic Sen. Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire, who gave her maiden floor speech on Monday, talks to HOH about playing rugby, her son, and the greatest quarterback of all time.

Q: As a New Englander and someone who was born in Boston, what were your emotions when the Patriots and Falcons went into overtime at the Super Bowl last Sunday night?

Word on the Hill: How Would D.C. Fare in Trade War With Mexico?
A great place to take a nap

D.C. has the least amount of imports from Mexico as a percentage of total imports. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Except for Alaska, the District of Columbia would be least affected by the economic fallout of a trade war with Mexico, a new study shows.

The most affected states would be Texas, Arizona, and Michigan, according to the WalletHub study. D.C. ranked 50th, just ahead of Alaska.

Photos of the Week: Immigration Protests, Committee Boycotts and a High Court Nominee
The week of Jan. 30 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Protesters gather on Monday in front of the Supreme Court to oppose President Trump's executive order barring immigrants from certain countries entry into the U.S. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BY TOM WILLIAMS AND BILL CLARK

A busy week in Washington started off with protests at Dulles International Airport and in front of the Supreme Court against President Donald Trump’s immigration executive order. Protests made it into the halls of Congress as well, as Senate Democrats boycotted several hearings for Trump’s Cabinet nominees. 

There’s No Rest for the Fundraising Weary
Vulnerable freshmen face high expectations for first quarter fundraising

Nevada Rep. Jacky Rosen, seen here with DCCC Chairman Ben Ray Luján, will be a top target for Republicans in 2018 and says she’ll be kicking off fundraising events in February. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Even before they’ve settled into their new lives on Capitol Hill, freshman House members from swing districts need to prepare for the fight to stay there. 

No member likes to talk about fundraising. Navigating the halls during the first month of the 115th Congress, new members stressed the importance of listening to the people who sent them to Washington. 

Word on the Hill: D.C. Rated Fourth Best in Highway Safety Laws
Restaurant opening in the DMV

Despite how you feel about your morning commute, D.C. has good highway safety laws. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy February! Here’s some good news — your commute around Washington, D.C., isn't as bad as you think.

The Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety named their best and worst states when it comes to 15 basic highway safety laws. South Dakota was the worst, followed by Wyoming and Arizona.

Neil Gorsuch Nominated by Trump for U.S. Supreme Court
10th Circuit judge lauded by president for his ‘extraordinary résumé’

President Donald Trump nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House January 31, 2017 in Washington, DC. If confirmed, Gorsuch would fill the seat left vacant with the death of Associate Justice Antonin Scalia in February 2016. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday announced his nomination of U.S. Circuit Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, setting up a confirmation showdown with Senate Democrats still upset over how Republicans blocked the last pick. 

In a prime-time event broadcast from the East Room of the White House, Trump touted Gorsuch as among the finest and most brilliant legal minds in the country — and a fulfillment of his campaign promise to find the best judge in the country to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia.