new hampshire

Word on the Hill: Ayotte Joins Bono’s Board
Weekend plans?

Former New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte, who helped shepherd the Supreme Court confirmation of Justice Neil Gorsuch earlier this year, has joined the ONE Campaign. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Former Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., joined the board of the ONE Campaign, an organization co-founded by U2 frontman Bono

The ONE Campaign bills itself as focusing on fighting poverty and extreme diseases. 

Former Colleagues Reflect on Life of Pete Domenici
Speaker Ryan learned from Domenici as a staffer

Chief Justice Warren Burger with Sen. Pete V. Domenici, R-N.M., talking over a book at the Capitol Hill Reception for the New Washington Guide Book in 1975. (Photo by CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan was a Senate staffer back when Sen. Pete V. Domenici wielded the gavel of the Senate Budget Committee.

Ryan was one of the relatively small number of lawmakers quick to offer condolences on the passing of the Republican from New Mexico, who was one of the most influential senators of his era.

Opinion: The Terror Within — Those Who See Danger in Diversity
Focus should be on bringing America together

White nationalists and neo-Nazis exchange insults with counterprotesters on Aug. 12 in Charlottesville, Va. Americans are eager to fight foreign enemies but they often ignore signs of terror from within, Curtis writes. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images File Photo)

It was a stirring message of unity. On Monday, 16 years after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on American soil that saw planes flown into the Twin Towers and the Pentagon, and brave passengers divert one into a Pennsylvania field, President Donald Trump honored the memories of the dead and the heroics woven through the actions of so many.

At a 9/11 commemoration ceremony at the Pentagon, Trump recalled that moment: “On that day, not only did the world change, but we all changed. Our eyes were opened to the depths of the evil we face. But in that hour of darkness, we also came together with renewed purpose. Our differences never looked so small, our common bonds never felt so strong.”

Second Meeting of Trump Election Commission Brings Fresh Criticism
New Hampshire officials do not roll out welcome mat

From left, former Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner at a meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity on Tuesday in Manchester, N.H. (Holly Ramer/AP)

A host of fresh criticism rained down on President Donald Trump’s commission on voter fraud Tuesday as it held its second meeting since the panel’s creation in May.

Most of the harshness was directed at Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, a Republican who led the meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in his capacity as vice chairman. Vice President Mike Pence, the panel’s chairman, was not present.

Trump’s Voter Fraud Panel Remains Lightning Rod
Some see commission as Washington’s most dangerous advisory board

President Donald Trump, flanked by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and Vice President Mike Pence speaks during the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in Washington in July. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images File Photo)

If anyone in Washington was wondering just how seriously Democrats were taking a presidential advisory commission tasked with finding voter fraud, the answer came in late August, when Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer compared the commission with the white supremacists and neo-Nazis who clashed with counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, earlier in the month.

“If the president wants to truly show that he rejects the discrimination agenda of the white supremacist movement, he will rescind the Executive Order that created this commission,” the New York Democrat wrote in a post on Medium.com. He added that the commission was “a ruse,” whose “only intention is to disenfranchise voters.”

Word on the Hill: Welcome Back
DACA rally and live music

Sen. Ted Cruz donned his eclipse glasses and watched a once-in-a-lifetime event with millions of other Americans. (Sen. Ted Cruz via Twitter)

August recess is over and the House and Senate return today.

Take a look at who HOH deemed the recess winners this summer.

Push for D.C. Statehood Continues, Despite Odds
District leaders strategize on outreach to rest of country

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., seen in this May 2016 photo, are both planning to push again this fall for the D.C. statehood cause. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Since Election Day 2016, when 86 percent of D.C. voters said they wanted the District of Columbia to become a state, the city’s statehood movement advocates have been strategizing on a path forward.

Mayor Muriel Bowser, who affirmed her support for statehood since assuming office in 2015, has a plan this fall she hopes will bring the issue to the attention of Congress and Americans outside the nation’s capital city.

Voter Fraud Panel Chair Swipes at Schumer Over Charlottesville
Kobach: ‘It’s a pathetic, partisan attempt to wrap Charlottesville around every issue’

Vice chair of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election, Kris Kobach. The Kansas secretary of state is also running for governor. (CQ Roll Call)

The vice chair of a presidential commission charged with investigating voting fraud swung back at the Democratic leader of the Senate Friday, saying it was “pathetic” that Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer equated the panel with white supremacists and a deadly rally earlier this month in Charlottesville, Virginia.

“It’s a pathetic, partisan attempt to wrap Charlottesville around every issue he can think of,” said Kris Kobach, the vice chair of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity. “It’s complete nonsense.”

Tim Ryan: ‘We’ll See’ About White House Run
Ohio congressman asked in New Hampshire about his long game

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, said he is focused on helping “forgotten America” and workers displaced by globalization. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan did not rule out a White House run when asked over the weekend in New Hampshire if he would pursue the presidency in 2020.

Ryan was invited to speak at New Hampshire’s Young Democrats’ cookout last week, the latest in a round of speeches and campaigning across the country.

Word on the Hill: Capitol Hill Could Save You Money
Ryan in New Hampshire, Williams at nonprofit, Murphy’s march continues

Save some money, move to Capitol Hill. Above, Tennessee’s David Kustoff arrives at the Capitol Hill Hotel for new member orientation on Nov. 14, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Here’s some good news for congressional staffers: Capitol Hill was ranked the fourth best place in D.C. to save money if you’re living off an annual salary of $50,000.

The financial planning app Rize released a list of the 14 best and worst places to live in D.C. on a $50,000 salary. Petworth, NoMa and Southwest Waterfront ranked first, second and third, respectively. Georgetown was ranked last.