Nevada

NRCC Goes After Blue-Collar Districts in 2018
GOP campaign arm releases list of 36 initial targets

Rep. Tim Walz speaks with guests during a campaign event in Duluth for fellow Minnesota Rep. Rick Nolan last fall. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The National Republican Congressional Committee’s initial list of offensive targets for 2018 includes 36 Democrat-held districts, many in blue-collar areas of the country.

If Democrats are targeting the well-educated suburbs (see New Jersey’s 11th District, for example), where Donald Trump either barely won or underperformed, Republicans are going after many rural districts where Hillary Clinton underperformed the congressional ticket. 

Predatory Behavior: The Dark Side of Capitol Hill
Congress has done very little to tighten its controls over sexual harassment

The United States Capitol building. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Among the many charges of sexual misbehavior that surfaced during the 2016 campaign was one in October by Donald Trump’s campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, who recalled members of Congress in the past “rubbing up against girls, sticking their tongues down women’s throats” without their consent.

There’s No Rest for the Fundraising Weary
Vulnerable freshmen face high expectations for first quarter fundraising

Nevada Rep. Jacky Rosen, seen here with DCCC Chairman Ben Ray Luján, will be a top target for Republicans in 2018 and says she’ll be kicking off fundraising events in February. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Even before they’ve settled into their new lives on Capitol Hill, freshman House members from swing districts need to prepare for the fight to stay there. 

No member likes to talk about fundraising. Navigating the halls during the first month of the 115th Congress, new members stressed the importance of listening to the people who sent them to Washington. 

GOP Leaders Move to Shore Up Shaky DeVos Nomination
Education nominee moves up in the floor queue

Betsy DeVos’ nomination for Education secretary lost key support Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Word on the Hill: D.C. Rated Fourth Best in Highway Safety Laws
Restaurant opening in the DMV

Despite how you feel about your morning commute, D.C. has good highway safety laws. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy February! Here’s some good news — your commute around Washington, D.C., isn't as bad as you think.

The Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety named their best and worst states when it comes to 15 basic highway safety laws. South Dakota was the worst, followed by Wyoming and Arizona.

Staffer Guide: Cast a Wide Net
Chandler Smith says it’s the little things that matter

Chandler Smith is communications director for the Senate Republican Conference. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Schumer Remakes the Ohio Clock Show
Minority leader brings out Sanders and Stabenow to bash Trump on trade

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders added some flair to Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer’s press conference on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer is, predictably, louder and more animated than his predecessor as Democratic leader, Nevada’s Harry Reid. When Democrats addressed the media in the Capitol’s Ohio Clock Corridor after weekly policy lunches, reporters often needed to huddle as close to the lectern as possible just to hear Reid over background noise. There is no such problem with Schumer. 

And this week, the first full one of the Trump White House, a fired-up  Schumer emerged from Tuesday’s Democratic caucus lunch with reinforcements in the form of two lieutenants with particular interest in the New York’s message of the day on trade policy.

Democratic Lawmakers Feel Boost from Women’s March
Minority party hopes movement will help Congress rein in Trump

Protesters march down Independence Avenue in Washington, holding signs during the women’s march on Saturday, the day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Capitol Dome was more than just a symbolic backdrop for Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington. It was the intended target of hundreds of thousands of voices of frustration with President Donald Trump. 

For all of the anti-Trump placards — both crude and shrewd — many marchers descended on the nation’s capital to send a message to the branch of government that, they hope, will be a check on the new president.

The Final Dignity of Hillary Clinton
An example for the nation: Time to move forward

Hillary Clinton, seen here at inauguration, shows America again and again that it’s returning from failure that matters, Murphy writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

I can’t remember how many times in the last three months I have typed “the final indignity of Hillary Clinton.” Even for a woman who has been in the spotlight for decades, she seems to have had more than her fair share.

Had she not run for the Senate as first lady, it’s possible that Clinton’s final indignity would have been her husband’s betrayals, literally in the Oval Office, after she had supported him for years. But after a failed impeachment against him and a New York listening tour for her, “Mrs. Clinton” became “Sen. Clinton” and she was on her way to a political career of her own.

Senate to Vote on at Least Two Cabinet Nominees Friday
Democrats are calling for more time to vet controversial nominees

Schumer said Democrats want more time to vet nominees. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate is expected to vote on at least two of President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees after he is sworn in on Friday. 

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer said Thursday that he expected votes on retired Gens. John Kelly to be the next Homeland Security secretary and James Mattis to lead the Defense Department. Schumer also said debate will begin on Kansas Rep. Mike Pompeo’s nomination to be the CIA director, with a vote possible on Friday or early next week.