National Institutes of Health

Which of These Bills Is Not Like the Others? The Defense Budget
Testy and balky debate, like this year, still has ended with authorization for 57 straight years

Two U.S. army Blackhawk helicopters approach for landing at an airfield in Australia during a joint U.S. and Australian training exercise in July. (Ian Hitchcock/Getty Images File Photo)

For the uninitiated, it might have seemed last week like the annual legislation authorizing the nation’s military was about to come off the rails. And only now does it appear to be clamoring out of some thick mud — yet another example of a Congress so challenged when it comes to discharging even its most fundamental responsibilities.

Rest assured, though: There’s truly nothing more certain in the Capitol’s life cycle than enactment of the annual National Defense Authorization Act.

McCain to Continue Cancer Treatment While Working
Arizona Republican diagnosed with a brain tumor in July

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., will continue to receive chemotherapy and radiation treatment while working. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Sen. John McCain will continue to receive chemotherapy and radiation treatment while maintaining his work schedule in the U.S. Senate, his office announced on Tuesday.

“Senator McCain received an MRI at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland yesterday. Following the advice of his doctors, Senator McCain will continue to receive targeted radiation and chemotherapy treatments at NIH while maintaining a regular work schedule in the United States Senate,” the statement read.

Complaints From Top NIH Scientist Preceded Rollback Of Lab Restrictions
Internal pushback highlights aftermath of 2015 scandal

Current National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins was the head of the agency when major safety issues were uncovered in 2015. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Complaints from a top scientist at the National Institutes of Health preceded at least a partial rollback of restrictions on the number of patients that could receive treatment in his lab, according to emails obtained by CQ Roll Call under the Freedom of Information Act. 

The facility in question was previously closed after an independent audit revealed black mold in the lab, among other major compliance issues. 

NIH Contractor Dispute Underscores Agency Conflicts
Agency is trying to change cultural norms that led to 2015 scandal

NIH Director Francis S. Collins pledged in 2015 that all research conducted on the agency’s premises would adhere to federal manufacturing standards. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A key contractor at the National Institutes of Health is urging employees to forgo compliance with federal guidelines, citing consent agreements signed by patients that acknowledge the risk of participating in clinical research at the agency, Roll Call has learned.

The agency denies the contractor’s actions and that it would ever relax compliance.

NIH Probe by House Panel Expands
Energy and Commerce asks for documents related to 2015 scandal

Francis S. Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, is under fire from House Republicans, upset over a scandal at the agency, as well as Collins’ views on research issues. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The National Institutes of Health is in hot water again with the House Energy and Commerce Committee over a scandal that occurred nearly two years ago at one of the agency’s main research institutions.

On Thursday, the panel broadened its probe into safety and compliance issues at the NIH Clinical Center, a research hospital located on the agency’s campus in Bethesda, Maryland. In a letter sent to Director Francis Collins and obtained by Roll Call, the committee requested a larger swath of documents not yet provided by the agency.

How the House Finally Got to ‘Yes’ on Health Care
Frenzied final negotiations helped win over enough holdouts

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, center, and Chief Deputy Whip Patrick McHenry lead a group of Republican members to the House floor Thursday to vote on the GOP health care bill after meeting with White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The final push on the health care bill started in earnest Monday night.

At 6 p.m., a cadre of Republican lawmakers from the Energy and Commerce Committee met in an unmarked Capitol office to make changes they hoped would bring moderate holdouts on board with the party’s overhaul of the health care system.

Progressives’ ‘People's Budget’ Becomes ‘Roadmap for the Resistance’
Yearly budget calls for big jobs and infrastructure spending, tax hikes for the rich

From left, Rep. Brenda Lawrence, D-Mich., Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Ariz., Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., and Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., unveil the Progressive Caucus' "budget deal principles" outside the Capitol in 2015. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With the subtitle “A Roadmap for the Resistance,” the Congressional Progressive Caucus’ “People's Budget,” isn't shy about its purpose in the Trump Era.

As Rep. Barbara Lee summarized it: “In stark contrast to President Trump’s cruel poverty budget, our progressive proposal is a plan for resistance and a roadmap to a safer, healthier and more prosperous America for all.”

Word on the Hill: Capitol Artwork Wrapped
Former congresswoman joins NYU, and conservative senators get ranked

Paintings have been wrapped on the Senate side of the Capitol during testing of a new smoke control system. (Niels Lesniewski/CQ Roll Call)

You may have noticed that some paintings and busts around the Capitol are covered in a plastic wrapping.

The artwork located in the corridors and grand stairwells of the Capitol are all covered for their protection during the testing of the new smoke control system

Durbin Undergoes Procedure for Irregular Heartbeat
Senate Democrat Expected to Remain in Illinois for the Week

Sen. Richard J. Durbin, D-Ill., has been treated for an irregular heartbeat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Minority Whip Richard J. Durbin underwent an outpatient procedure Tuesday morning to address an abnormal heart rate discovered during a recent physical, his office announced in a release.

The procedure to correct a condition known as an atrial flutter utilized “painless radiofrequency energy” to get rid of irregular heart tissue and restore a regular heart rhythm, according to Durbin’s office.

How the Omnibus Became a Democratic Wish List
Pelosi, Schumer maximized leverage of the minority, and their votes

Sen. Patrick Leahy, right, ranking member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, said Democrats and Republicans were able to craft a bipartisan spending plan to fund the government without too much influence from the White House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Patrick J. Leahy has been an appropriator for decades.

But the Vermont Democrat said Monday that for the first time in as long as he could remember, he did not hear from the White House while working to craft an omnibus bill to fund the government for the rest of the fiscal year.